ICOMoon, Adobe Shadow, Evernote and Everclip

The Boagworld Show returns for season 4. Apps reviewed include ICOMoon, Adobe Shadow, Evernote and Everclip

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On this week’s show:

About season 4

Paul Boag:
Hello and welcome. I am just too excited. Let’s just get into it, I can’t be bothered to wait for the whole “Hello, and welcome to Boagworld, a podcast for all those involved in design…” None of that this week, we’re just going to go for it. Go, Marcus go, say something witty and clever.

Marcus Lillington:
Hello, Paul.

Paul Boag:
Hi. Rob, say something witty and clever.

Rob Borley:
I have been really excited to hear your preamble and now I feel disappointed.

Paul Boag:
Oh, have I taken it away from you?

Rob Borley:
A little bit. The shine has gone from this magical experience.

Paul Boag:
Oh, I am sorry. Oh, that’s so sad.

Marcus Lillington:
No one listens to this show for any content. They just want to hear the banter.

Paul Boag:
Truth is no one listens to this show anymore.

Rob Borley:
That’s because this show doesn’t exist anymore.

Marcus Lillington:
No. But it does again now.

Paul Boag:
No we are in stealth mode, nobody shall know that we exist, right. So, yes, as Marcus has alluded, we’re now back weekly.

Marcus Lillington:
Weekly, yes.

Paul Boag:
Right? So we are still going to do seasons but we’re only going to have like a week break between each season.

Marcus Lillington:
Just the one week.

Paul Boag:
Well, I mean like Christmas, I might give you Christmas day off.

Rob Borley:
How is that still a season, Paul, explain?

Marcus Lillington:
It’s not.

Paul Boag:
Well we are going to have different topics each season.

Rob Borley:
I see.

Paul Boag:
So, we’re still going to have like topic based stuff, right.

Rob Borley:
Right. They’re just going to flow.

Paul Boag:
But they’ll essentially flow from one season. There will be a little break between for us to kind of take breath and then go for it again, but there won’t be any long breaks, so people won’t get confused and think that we’re not podcasting anymore, which is what most people now think, which is great. It’s like starting anew all over again because nobody actually listens to us anymore.

Marcus Lillington:
That’s quite depressing. You’re still here.

Paul Boag:
I liked it.

Marcus Lillington:
Starting again from zero.

Paul Boag:
When we had like 600 listeners that was my favorite part. That’s when I enjoyed it the most, because you knew everybody – it’s like you knew everybody that was listening to the show, it’s great.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah, okay, so what are these new shows, how are they going to work, Paul?

Paul Boag:
That sounded like a very kind of professionally handed over question. What do you mean?

Marcus Lillington:
What’s the format? Are we going to do I don’t know – have we got famous people to interview?

Paul Boag:
Well maybe, I don’t know really.

Marcus Lillington:
Like TV stars and stuff like that.

Paul Boag:
But we’re returning to our roots, Marcus…

Marcus Lillington:
Okay.

Paul Boag:
Right. And in the early days, right, before we decided to be sensible and grown up, you know when we received so much criticism for the amount of waffle right. So suddenly then I started getting organized and I wrote all these long posts before we did the show and essentially I think the show lost a bit of its waffleness. So screw everybody…

Marcus Lillington:
Wafflocity.

Paul Boag:
So essentially what happened is all the people that like the waffleness stopped listening, right. So now we’ve just got left the people that like the structure. So what we’re now going to do is change that so they don’t like it and then we’ll have no listeners. So that’s the plan.

Marcus Lillington:
We are going to be talking about things though aren’t we?

Paul Boag:
Yeah, yeah, yeah, absolutely.

Marcus Lillington:
Other than sort of the fact that I am on a diet this week.

Paul Boag:
I don’t care about that.

Marcus Lillington:
I do. Massively, this is big news for me, I don’t do diets.

Paul Boag:
You’ve done a diet before, I remember your wife putting you on one a while back.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah, it’s exactly the same thing. Basically I am going to a Summer Ball or an Autumn Ball. It’s so funny. I am going to make other references throughout the show.

Paul Boag:
My one instruction before we start the show was, don’t say anything topical because I don’t want people to know we’re recording this in July when it’s not going out until August and then immediately you…

Marcus Lillington:
Hilarious.

Paul Boag:
It’s not going out ‘till September I mean.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah, well hey ho.

Paul Boag:
And you screw it up.

Marcus Lillington:
That’s quite funny though. I can’t fit in my trousers basically and she said you are not buying another dinner jacket, you only wear it once a year. So I couldn’t really argue with that. So I am living on crumbs, hungry and angry.

Paul Boag:
Hungry and angry. So you were asking what we are going to do. Basically each season is going to have an overarching theme. So between now and Christmas, we’re going to look at awesome apps and terrific tools. See what I did there?

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah.

Paul Boag:
See it is clever that, isn’t it. So we are going to look at tools that web designers or what – or tools and apps that web designers, website owners and developers may find useful. And then next season we’ll go on and we’ll do something else like the cool articles or whatever is out. So the idea is, what we used to do is, everybody used to love the news section and essentially the news section was never news, it was like whatever I currently happen to have seen even if it was six months or a year old. So we’re kind of doing that but we’re not calling it news. But in between of all that we might drop in some random interviews and whatever the hell we feel like basically.

Marcus Lillington:
That sounds like a great plan. Whatever the hell we feel.

Paul Boag:
Yeah, yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
Marvelous.

Paul Boag:
Entertaining, fast moving, informative, the place to be for the six people still listening.

Rob Borley:
I can’t wait.

Paul Boag:
But don’t tell anyone else about it because we don’t want more listeners.

Marcus Lillington:
Absolutely.

Paul Boag:
It will just ruin everything. Okay, so – but, yes – so we’re doing this season, we’re doing terrific tools awesome apps, which is great and we’ve done a few, we sat down and came up with as many apps as we could possibly think of that were even vaguely good, but that took to about three shows or something like that. So we really need people to kind of suggest what do people need to know, what cool apps are out there. So if you are one of the six listeners, go along to boagworld.com/season/4 and there will be like a comment section in there where you can post your cool apps and ideas, stuff that you’ve seen that you really like and you think we ought to share on the show and people then – there’s also the ability on those to vote them up and down.

So if there’s one that you really like, say you like it and if you don’t like it, you can dislike it and then in that way, that is going to weed out the people that are just self-promoting and saying, hey, check out my cool new app, which nobody has ever heard of or don’t care about. Alright? So that’s the plan if you are one of the six people listening.

So, right, this week, what are we doing this week? We’re going to try to do four apps a week. We are going to do roughly speaking, this is only very roughly, a kind of designery thing, a developy thing, a website ownery thing, because those are our three audiences and then we’re just chucking in for good measure, we’re going to talk about a bit of mobile and cool mobile apps. Either apps that are good in themselves or apps that do like are maybe shit apps but look good or function well. So the one example you gave was Google+. Nobody uses Google+, nobody cares about Google+, but they do have a good app.

Rob Borley:
It’s a very pretty app.

Paul Boag:
Apparently, I can’t say I’ve used it, so I wouldn’t know, but there you go.

Rob Borley:
That will be an exciting one to talk about.

Paul Boag:
It will be, I can’t wait, I don’t know what we’re doing that on, but who knows, we’re making this up as we go along. Okay, first up …

Marcus Lillington:
Is? Sorry, I was just reading jokes.

IcoMoon

icomoon.io

Paul Boag:
That’s what you checked out. I understand that. The first up is our designer app and it is IcoMoon. So, Marcus, tell us about IcoMoon.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah, well this is a really cool app, actually. I’ve been using it for about six weeks now.

Paul Boag:
Right.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah. And I’ve forgotten about it now. What does it do? Icons.

Paul Boag:
I am impressed, he is working now, what’s the moon bit?

Marcus Lillington:
That’s got nothing to do with it.

Paul Boag:
It’s just one of those made up…

Marcus Lillington:
I think it’s something to do – it’s a tool that allows you to develop your own kind of typeface and font out of a set of icons.

Paul Boag:
He was paying attention to me.

Rob Borley:
Wow, I am actually quite impressed.

Paul Boag:
Yeah, well done, Marcus.

Marcus Lillington:
Can I go back to sleep now?

Paul Boag:
Congratulations, yes you can. I just wanted to – so, yes, this is an interesting one, isn’t it? For me this all comes out of retina displays, which is interesting because you’ve blogged about a book that somebody has written on that.

Rob Borley:
Yeah I tweeted about a book, about…

Paul Boag:
You tweeted, tweeted….

Rob Borley:
…some book about…

Paul Boag:
About dealing with retina, right. We will link to that in the show notes. Now I said that in a really, really kind of – we will link to that in the show notes because when we get the transcription through, now I can search on the phrase, we link to that in the show notes and then I can remember to link to it, which is really cunning, right. So you need to give me that link because I can’t remember what it was. You wanted me to buy it and haven’t got around it because I was busy, that’s right, because I am a busy guy. Why can’t you buy it?

Rob Borley:
Because I want you to pay for it.

Paul Boag:
Okay, I’ll give you a credit card, that’s fine. Well anyway, so retina displays are everywhere at the moment, we’ve got them on the iPhone, the iPad, Macs and you can guarantee everybody else is going to copy it. So it’s a big, big area at the moment and one of the problems to that, obviously is that graphics look shit unless you do them at high resolution and then they take a long time to download, blah-blah-blah, so we really kind of need to wherever possible kind of go more vectory in our approach. Now our options there are SVG which works perfectly well and it is perfectly good but it is – actually why has SVG never caught on?

Rob Borley:
It’s always been an amazingly good idea. I think I first saw SVG kicking around in 2000 or 2001.

Paul Boag:
Yeah, late ‘90s.

Rob Borley:
It’s always a wow that’s amazing. But no one’s ever really done anything with it.

Paul Boag:
I know. It’s really weird. Anyway, once again, we’re going to ignore SVG.

Marcus Lillington:
Great. Like everyone else.

Paul Boag:
Like everyone else, as tradition dictates even though it seems perfectly good to me. I’m sure somebody would tell us in the show notes.

Rob Borley:
Please do write in and tell us why it’s bad.

Paul Boag:
Why SVG? You couldn’t – there will be show notes. Again, you can get those by boagworld.com/season/4 and then you can get to the episode from there. Right, yes, so essentially, we need to go vector. So what are our options there? We’ve got SVG but nobody understands it or uses it. That’s a huge sweeping generalization, it’s not true but anyway. So I will turn to the fonts. So of course, now, we’ve got web fonts and web fonts are the cool thing that all the cool kids are doing and they are obviously tiny and they are vector based. So what IcoMoon does is it allows you to go along and it’s got like hundreds and hundreds of different icons as font sets. And you can even upload your own font set because there’s lots of other places you can get icons as well. And you can upload those on to IcoMoon and then just go through and select just the icons you need.

So instead of having the entire font set with all these hundreds of icons, you just go through and say, you know, I want that icon, that icon, that icon, and that icon and then you can save that down as a font set. And then you can embed it in your website just like you would any other font and you can manipulate it like any other font which means that you can change the size, it looks crisp on retina displays but more than that you can also apply all your CSS styles to it. So you can, for example, add text shadows to it, you can change the color of it, you can do anything, you can do to a piece of typography, you can do to these icons.

So suddenly, you’ve got these really tiny files that scale beautifully, can be manipulated in anyway whatsoever and you can put them on your website. And IcoMoon makes it so easy for you, they give you the code of how to use it, they give you all of the information you could possibly need in order to get up and running on that and let you download your specific font set, you can also download them as images if you want to which is a bonus.

Chris Coyier – I’ll put a link in the show notes – wrote a really good article about how to get started with icons and to deal with the accessibility issues associated with them and everything else. It all – when you first read it, it feels a little bit confusing, a little bit overwhelming but I’ve managed to use it successfully on a couple of websites. So it can’t be that difficult. So there you go, that’s IcoMoon. I don’t know what the exact URL is. Marcus, say something witty while I type into a box, IcoMoon.

Marcus Lillington:
Nothing witty is coming out at the moment, Paul. I’m reading rubbish jokes at the moment.

Paul Boag:
Right. So that’s…

Rob Borley:
Bodes well for later.

Paul Boag:
Oh, yeah. It’s Keyamoon, so keyamoon.com/icomoon and they have even got little demo video, so you go ooh. So this is where video would be really good.

Marcus Lillington:
Are we going to talk about how much these things cost?

Paul Boag:
That’s a really good point.

Marcus Lillington:
I think we should.

Paul Boag:
Yes, absolutely.

Marcus Lillington:
Or whether we think they are good value, blah-blah-blah?

Paul Boag:
Yeah, absolutely. I was always a little confused by this, right, because I don’t really understand what you’re purchasing on this site.Yes, I am slightly – I will be honest, I am slightly confused by this. Essentially, it’s like an online – I’ve got it, I’ve got it, I’ve got it. I understand it now.

Basically, they seem to provide an online service free where you can go and you can start using the app online, it does all this kind of cool stuff and you can download your font stack, et cetera. And that appears to be free and, I don’t know, this is where I am really worried but it’s like something licensing – the developer friendly licensing. Yeah, no, we can use – yeah, you can use it on your website, yes, I’m correct. I just had a little panic. But they do have like an offline HTML5 application that you can kind of run offline if you so need it to and they ask you to pay $39 for that, although they say if you really can’t afford that you can pay $29, in fact you can pay any random amount. It’s basically a donation type thing.

Marcus Lillington:
Sure.

Paul Boag:
So it’s great. It’s really good, highly recommended, check it out, and give it a go. Don’t think I’ve got anything more to say on that particular one. But, anymore questions on it?

Marcus Lillington:
Okay.

Paul Boag:
Okay. Then let’s move on. Okay, so next up….

Marcus Lillington:
What’s next?

Paul Boag:
Next up is a developer tool. Well the trouble is, I am not – I am having problems with this developer thing. It’s interesting. I had the same problem on the Headscape website, right? What is developer and what is designer anymore? I don’t really know. It’s interesting. Well, you’ve written a copy for the development section. It used to be all kind of .NET service side stuff but now you’ve included in it front-end coding, right? So, I was going through – where we’ve shown our case studies and I go – it’s – we did design, we did development, we did it. Of course, design – development now is on every single one essentially because….

Marcus Lillington:
Yes, apart from a consultancy job.

Paul Boag:
…everything – yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah and that’s pretty….

Paul Boag:
So, it’s a bit wooly. I don’t know what’s the….

Marcus Lillington:
Do you think that’s the right thing to do, Paul? Should we talk about the Headscape website?

Paul Boag:
No, let’s not.

Rob Borley:
This one came up when I was speaking at Adobe Creative Week.

Paul Boag:
Oh, yeah.

Rob Borley:
This was one of the questions that came up.

Paul Boag:
Oh, I like the way you dropped it, “when I was on Adobe Creative TV”.

Rob Borley:
Don’t you know I’m an international superstar? But, this came up. The general thrust of the show was should you be a jack of all trades or master of one apparently? And, it’s where you the draw line between designer and developer and there seem to be a bit of a blurring between designer and front-end developer and then real back-end developers, the kind of over here.

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Rob Borley:
So, are you pitching these tools at the front-end developer?

Paul Boag:
To be honest, I’m having too at the moment because I’m not a back-end developer. So, if I had to talk about – I don’t even know what words to use here, Visual Studio, whatever they’re going to use; I have heard them say it.

Marcus Lillington:
We should get Craig up here and make him talk about stuff that he does use.

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
Because you’ve got even further deeper developers than that that develop software and operating systems….

Paul Boag:
Yes.

Rob Borley:
Instead of using punch cards and abacuses…

Paul Boag:
Yes, who can speak in binary. So, at the moment, I’m focusing on front-end developer tools, but I’ve got no problem with people – obviously, when people start recommending tools, I’d love to do some hardcore developer stuff but they just might have to explain it to me before I could do it.

Rob Borley:
Keep the words to two syllables or less.

Adobe Shadow

Adobe Shadow in action

Paul Boag:
So, when you post on the – your ideas for applications, please say a little bit about what it is and how it works in case I don’t understand. So, yes – so my choice today to kick us off is Adobe Shadow. Most people I think have heard of Adobe Shadow but I….

Marcus Lillington:
Even I have.

Paul Boag:
Even you have.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah, watched the video, I thought. Oh, that’s cool!

Paul Boag:
But, I’m not sure – yeah, I think a lot of people have done that, gone “oh, yeah, yeah, it’s really good” but haven’t necessarily used it a lot. Well, I have – I have started using it quite heavily with the Headscape site and also when I do Boagworld and it is massively, massively useful. So, essentially, what it does is you – it’s a bit confusing that first what you have to have, like, a little app that runs in the background. For some reason, they insist on having this annoying box that – why it can’t just be a toolbar kind of application but anyway.

So, it’s kind of an application that runs in the background, which probably is Adobe AIR; I think it probably is. And, then you have an application that runs on your iPhone, your iPad, your Android device, whatever else. And, then you have a plug-in for your browser, be it Safari or Chrome; I don’t know whether they do Safari one actually. They definitely do a Chrome one and probably – I don’t know. I need to look that up. But, essentially, they do plug-ins for different browsers. And, you have to have all these things running and it takes – it’s a little bit fiddly to set up but essentially what it does is it means that whatever is showing on your desktop browser is also then showing on your iPhone, your iPad, or your other device. So, every time you refresh your desktop browser, it updates all these other devices as well, which is freaking brilliant.

It’s so, so useful. So, it means that when you’re testing, you can see it across all devices simultaneously. Wonderful! And, I’ve been using it absolutely loads so essentially as I’m coding it – coding stuff up, I can see what it’s looking like on all the other devices as well because just resizing your browser doesn’t do the job. You can’t just stretch Chrome or Safari down to iPhone size and it isn’t the same. It doesn’t work….

Rob Borley:
What do you lose, Paul? Why can’t you just do that?

Paul Boag:
Well, part of the problem with Chrome and iPhone, for example, is the Chrome browser doesn’t go small enough to show in iPhone. Now – what’s iPhone? 320, is it, wide…?

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah. That’s true. Yeah, it doesn’t go….

Paul Boag:
And, it goes to 340.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
You always think it looks a bit wide.

Rob Borley:
Yeah.

Paul Boag:
So that’s one problem. But, you do also get strange, weirdness sometimes. JavaScript runs slightly differently or this – this is what we think, nothing ever goes bloody smoothly.

Rob Borley:
Yeah. So, it’s good to test on the real things. Simulators never cut it.

Paul Boag:
No, they don’t. You can get simulators for iPhone, but essentially, all they are doing is pulling in WebKit and that’s not the same as doing on a device. So, no, that – it’s really – you’re still highly recommending it. Setting up is a bit fiddly because you have to effectively install three bits of software to get it going. But, once it’s up and running, it’s just great. It just does its thing. You do need to do a bit of pairing as well, which is a slight pain to be honest. So, essentially what you need to do is, once you’ve installed the – your plug-in to your browser. You have to then launch the plug-in. I’m just trying to find it in my list. So, we really should be video – have a video….

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah.

Paul Boag:
…do a video show. If only you didn’t insist on always recording the podcast naked….

Rob Borley:
It’s okay. We’re sitting around the table.

Paul Boag:
Yes. So, essentially it’s a little pop-up box and you do a pairing with your various devices so it knows what to refresh and what not to. So, it’s really good. It’s really great. They’re developing it all the time. For example, as of the recording of this, it doesn’t currently support local host which, obviously if you do in development, is a bit of a pain. But, all I’ve done is I switched so I use a local IP address rather than a local host. But, they are setting it up to change that so that it will work on local host. The other cool thing it does, which I forgot to mention, is if something does go a bit screwy on the iPhone and you think what hell has it done there, you can effectively view source of inspect element, should I say, of the mobile device on your local PC.

Marcus Lillington:
Oh, that is clever.

Paul Boag:
So, you get like a bit of a Firebug type experience on your local; it’s not good as that but it’s not bad. You can inspect and do all that kind of cool stuff. So that works very, very well and is very useful when it does weird stuff. But, again that – at the moment with that, the URL has to be publicly accessible for them to do that, pass that across, but again that’s something they’re aware of and they’re working on. So, very cool app, definitely get your hands on it. It’s called Adobe Shadow. I’m sure you’re capable of doing a Google search to find it up because it’s got a slightly annoying URL. I’ll put it in the show notes….

Rob Borley:
You will link to it in the show notes.

Paul Boag:
Oh, yes. Link to it in the show notes. Must get the phrase right; otherwise, when I search it’s not going to work. Right, okay, I think that’s that one done.

Evernote

evernote.com

Alright. Third up, Marcus’ favorite application; this is one for website owners, although to be honest, I think this application is for absolutely everybody. It is Evernote, your favorite – why do you think it’s shit, Marcus?

Marcus Lillington:
I don’t think it’s shit. I just think it’s – all of these organize-yourself apps just – I’d rather have a pen and paper, frankly.

Paul Boag:
So, we ought to say what Evernote is in case you’re one of the three people in the world that doesn’t know what Evernote is.

Marcus Lillington:
I just find it more – yeah go on then.

Paul Boag:
Let’s say what it is first, right. Their strapline is “Remember Everything”, right? So, it’s not an organization app; it’s a remembering things app, right?

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah, okay.

Paul Boag:
So, you can capture anything from your iPhone, your iPad, your computer, Windows PC on the web, Android device, absolutely everywhere; they’ve got an app for everything and everywhere. So, you can capture whether you’re at your desk or out and about. You can access that stuff anywhere because it’s on the web and it’s then synced with your local devices. And, this is where I think a pen and paper doesn’t match it. You can find stuff fast.

Marcus Lillington:
You can go back and search on it.

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah, I’ll give you that.

Paul Boag:
And that’s the really cool bit.

Marcus Lillington:
You can’t do doodle on it.

Paul Boag:
You can.

Marcus Lillington:
No, you can’t.

Paul Boag:
I’ll tell you why you can. What I’ve started doing….

Marcus Lillington:
Draw a little diagram.

Paul Boag:
What I’ve started doing with it is – yes, you can do all of that.

Marcus Lillington:
But, you need to scan it into it.

Paul Boag:
Yeah, you scan it in. And, I have now got something called SnapScan which is a tiny little scanner. There is another one that I drool after which is even nicer, which is called Duex [ph]?

Rob Borley:
You should see the look on Paul’s face.

Paul Boag:
Doxi, yeah getdoxie.com and it’s a beautiful little scanner, battery-powered, little lock device, take a page, run it through, is on Evernote job done. And what’s really nice.

Marcus Lillington:
There is just one extra step that I can’t be bothered to do, that’s the thing.

Paul Boag:
Well, yes. But, then, what’s really nice about it, it’s because you scan it in – it’ll recognize your hand-writing, it’ll recognize the words in there and now all of that is searchable.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah. That is – I’m not denying the usefulness of it, I just can’t be bothered to take the extra step. I just like the old booklet and a pen or pencil.

Paul Boag:
Right. But I’m going to get into it and why it’s useful to do designers. Do you use it?

Rob Borley:
I do use it. I – my big issue, I have a pen and papers is I can’t read my hand-writing half the time. So, I need something that I can type on. I really like it, because across the line, so I don’t use it for storing pictures or web-clipping or anything like that. I use it just for taking notes and if I want to try in, just got my phone, I can write down a quick idea that pops into my head or if I’m in a meeting and I’ve just got an iPad, I can tap on, I’ve got all those notes, all accessible at the same time, I’ve never lost the notepad.

Marcus Lillington:
I think that’s the thing, that’s one more, my issue with it comes, it is – again, the idea of having your iPad in a meeting because that’s helpful, right but I – that’s where I think the pen and paper is better when you’re in a meeting, because you can kind of continually update your notes and link things together much more quickly than you can just typing into an iPad. So…

Paul Boag:
I don’t find that.

Marcus Lillington:
Personal preference really. But I’ve tried typing notes in meetings and I just find it irritating because I’ve suddenly lost this kind of ability to link things together and sort of go back in a bit there or draw a little thing.

Paul Boag:
I mean, this is a massive topic, but things you can’t do with pen and paper is you can’t go – I’m going to group that chunk of text with this chunk of text, move it up to put them together.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah, you can, draw a box around it, a box around that and then you link them together.

Paul Boag:
Yeah, but – yeah, okay. Also, I mean…

Marcus Lillington:
Granted I’m giving myself extra work by doing this. It’s just the actual process during the meeting.

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
I prefer to…

Paul Boag:
And for me, that’s – to be honest, we’re looking – you’re thinking entirely for meetings.

Marcus Lillington:
Yes.

Paul Boag:
And really meetings to me are just the tip of the iceberg for Evernote. So, for example, what I love about Evernote, let me talk through some of the ways I use Evernote, because it’s really appropriate to our designers, developers…

Marcus Lillington:
Oh shut up.

Paul Boag:
No, no, no, not at all. No, no. But for example, as – from a designer point of view, if I’m walking down the street and I see – this really sound really sad, if I see a texture right of paint peeling off a door, and I think oh, that’s cool, I can photograph it and it goes into Evernote.

If I’m walking down the road and I see a piece of typography on a poster I can photograph it and it goes into Evernote. So, it’s a place where I can keep all my inspiration as a designer, but equally, not only can I photograph it, I can then also, if I’m looking at a website, I can use a web-clipper off of it, just grab a little portion of it, pump it into Evernote. Now the great thing is in your kind of world of pen and paper, in that kind of scenario you always end up with stuff all over the place. You’ll have some inspiration that’s in – on your PC, in a folder, you’ll have some on your iPhone, this way it brings it all together, so it’s all searchable. You could also tag it as well, which is really nice, although to be honest, I don’t really bother most of the time, I just give it a title and that’s about it.

Marcus Lillington:
Because you can search on the title.

Paul Boag:
Yeah, exactly, and you can search on the content as well. So, I don’t – I’m not a big tagger, I know a lot people are, but I’m not.

Marcus Lillington:
So, it’s – your resources tool…

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
They are my things that I might find useful.

Paul Boag:
Yes, absolutely anything that you want to remember, essentially, even to the point of what’s really good with it, now with this plug-in – it’s with browser plug-in, if I search on Google, right, it show my Google results, it’ll also say, hang on a minute you’ve got like 35 matches in Evernote. You might want to check that out because obviously you’ve thought about this thing before.

So, it’s really good for remembering, actually it’s great – is a way of collecting inspiration, that’s one thing I really like about it. As a developer, it’s a great way for producing – keeping like little snippets of code. So, for example, I came across – which I have forgotten and I didn’t put into Evernote, so there we go, serves me right. I came across this problem doing Headscape site, right, where I wanted to overlay on – I have got a screen capture of a pretty design that we have done, right, of a website and I wanted to overlay a picture frame on top of it and I wanted that picture frame to give a inline shadow to the screenshot underneath. So I have to effectively lay a transparent PNG over the top of the graphic – the image. The problem is now you can’t click the image because there is a PNG line over the top of it.

Now I discovered there is a way of disabling in CSS I think it’s a pointer event, yeah, pointer event, which enables you to disable the event on the PNG, so you can go effectively click through the PNG to this content underneath, brilliant. Really good for transparent PNGs. Perfect thing, drop it in Evernote, then you’ll – next time you need to do that, you don’t need to Google it, it’s there, ready to go. So that’s really cool. I love it for kind of capturing bits of code and that kind of stuff and storing all that kind of thing. So it’s really good for that.

Marcus Lillington:
I mean I’ve got it – maybe I should try and use it, I don’t know.

Paul Boag:
I feel like I am forcing you, Marcus, you don’t need to, it’s okay.

Rob Borley:
It did take me a while to get into using it. I knew that I needed a tool to collect my notes because I had bits of paper and notepad and stuff all over the place, it’s somewhere in like a text file in my computer, so I knew that I needed a tool to get – I had to get into a workflow of always using it and that actually took a while to get that transition it was a kind of…

Paul Boag:
Going back to the pen and paper thing actually just reminded me of an app that you use and tweeted that you are obsessed with, the pen and paper thing, okay, you could be like me and buy one of these fancy scanners, right, but you’ve also got a scanner, you’ve got an iPhone, you’ve got an iPad, you can take photographs in them, there is an app you love, isn’t there?

Rob Borley:
Scanner Pro.

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Rob Borley:
Just the great, it’s changed my life. We are both obsessed by scanners.

Paul Boag:
What is it we are putting – what was the phrase? We will put a link in the show notes.

Rob Borley:
Oh yes, we will put a link in the show notes.

Paul Boag:
There we are, I forgot the wording of it.

Rob Borley:
Yeah.

Paul Boag:
Go on, so go on, carry on.

Rob Borley:
Yeah, the Scanner Pro, it just enables you to take a picture with your phone, but then it turns it into a scanned like document.

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Rob Borley:
I use it for expenses. So if I am on a train – I am always losing train tickets and receipts and it makes the whole expenses thing a real pain in the backside when you try and do it three months later. But I’m sat on a train, I have just bought a ticket, take a picture of it and it’s then beamed straight to Evernote or Dropbox or whatever you want as a PDF. And you can just submit it altogether.

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Rob Borley:
It’s amazing, it’s changed my life.

Paul Boag:
So you could use that photograph, written notes as well.

Rob Borley:
Exactly.

Paul Boag:
You do it with whiteboards, you’re always photographing whiteboards.

Marcus Lillington:
Yes, true.

Paul Boag:
And that could go straight to Evernote. But what’s really good about the scanner app is that it’s got Evernote integrated into it and the latest update that came out yesterday if you update it…

Rob Borley:
I haven’t.

Paul Boag:
You update to Scanner Pro, it’s very exciting.

Rob Borley:
Wow!

Paul Boag:
It now will automatically if you want send stuff to Evernote, so instead of having to do as an extra step, they will go straight to Evernote.

Rob Borley:
That’s good. It’s a shame that that was a contextual link you just put in there to do with timing about when this show is going out.

Paul Boag:
Damn, you tricked me.

Rob Borley:
You were doing so well.

Paul Boag:
Well, Marcus, ruined it earlier, but – so there you go.

Rob Borley:
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
I was going to say things like Olympic.

Paul Boag:
Oh. Well I was nearly going to say when I was talking about taking photographs of typography I like, really – the thing I really liked about the opening ceremony is right at the beginning when they did the countdown…

Marcus Lillington:
Fantastic.

Paul Boag:
…and they did lots of different numbers from all over London.

Marcus Lillington:
You just knew how good it was going to be based on that countdown.

Paul Boag:
Yeah, it’s so cool, wasn’t it? It was a really good ceremony. It was so British, wasn’t it? But kind of real British rather than the pomp and circumstance British.

Marcus Lillington:
It had a bit of everything.

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
It’s great.

Paul Boag:
It was the cross section. Yes anyway, we are not going to talk about that because that happened months ago.

Marcus Lillington:
Well, yeah, but it’s – we can hardly remember it now?

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Rob Borley:
But – yeah. Although somehow it seems like it was only yesterday.

Paul Boag:
Right, yes, so I was going to talk about website owners and why website – because this is supposed to be the website owners app. And we haven’t talked about why website owners…

Marcus Lillington:
Well, as a resource, as a note taking thing, that can apply to anybody.

Paul Boag:
Yes oh it does, absolutely, and we talked about designers and developers but for website owners I think it’s particularly good. I really use it loads and loads and loads as a website owner. And there is a number of ways to use it. One is I will add – if I read something cool on the web, I grab it and drop it into Evernote so I’ve got like quotes from all different things. I use it specifically to grab random quotes, random statistics, you know when you are always doing it. Mobile is good to reach to 98% saturation by next Tuesday and these kinds of things you need – sometimes you need them to back up your argument.

Marcus Lillington:
You pick and choose.

Paul Boag:
Yeah, I certainly do. So you can use it for that to kind of grab and keep those and the clipping tools are in the browser apps, great for that. The other thing you can do, I use – well, I don’t use it in this way, but I know a lot people do, is they use it to keep lists. Now as a website owner you should be keeping all kinds of lists. In fact, we will add a link in the show notes to a post I wrote, website owners should keep – hang on a second, this is really professional – yeah, I have written a post…

Marcus Lillington:
Makes it real though, Paul.

Paul Boag:
It does. I have written a post on Boagworld ages ago, which has five lists that every website owner should keep and Evernote is a great place to keep those lists. So there are things like blogging topics and that kind of stuff. The other thing that I use, I now use Evernote for is I keep it as a place for I do the drafts of copy that I am writing, whether it’d be for website or for an article or whatever else, I do it in Evernote. Because then it’s available to me on all devices, so if I have another little thought about it, I drop it into there or – and also I write…

Marcus Lillington:
You know what, I think this is – this kind of the ability to share stuff over different devices, it’s a great sort of people who use iPads, isn’t it? I am not an iPad user, so I mean I hardly ever pick up my phone and think, oh, I must take down a note and type it in.

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
Anything more than a line, you don’t want to type it.

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
But – so therefore or I have got my MacBook Air which is tiny and with the – and it’s just the only thing I use so I don’t need to worry about sharing across different …

Paul Boag:
No, not necessarily. Well, you do with something. You say you don’t use your iPhone to do stuff but if for example you are writing – let’s kind of say you are creating an outline for a new page, we have been writing content for the Headscape site. And you have written a bit on it but you kind of stopped then you have this idea of something else you want to add. It’s great to just pick up the iPhone and just putting a bullet point on that page.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah, I mean it’s – and that does happen very occasionally, I very occasionally just use the notes app in there, because I am thinking I need to write something down the only that I’ve got is my phone.

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
That’s like once a month.

Paul Boag:
And then also it’s the ability to able to take photographs and send into Evernote, it’s brilliant.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah, that’s cool, yeah.

Paul Boag:
The trouble is it’s almost…

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah, the photograph thing, yeah.

Paul Boag:
It’s a learnt habit, you have to kind of get into the habit of it and then once you are doing it, it’s really worthwhile.

Rob Borley:
I use it the same way. I draft all the stuff I write in Evernote and so I just get an idea to write, chuck in my phone and then it all comes together. It actually highlights the big issue I have with Evernote…

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Rob Borley:
…and that’s the text editor is shit.

Paul Boag:
It’s shockingly bad.

Rob Borley:
It’s really, really awful and every time you try copy and paste it somewhere else it breaks and like bullets break half way through and trying to delete a bullet and get it back, it like messes up the formatting.

Paul Boag:
To be honest, the way – it’s fine for me and I’ll tell you why in a minute but I completely agree with you and it’s a pain in the arse. The reason it’s fine for me is I write everything in Markdown and the reason I link – we will put a link in the show notes if you don’t know about Markdown. Markdown is a great way of writing – essentially writing HTML very quickly and very easily and there are lots of tools that will convert from Markdown into HTML. So if you are blogging, it’s great, because then in any device I can easily write Markdown and then grab it out of Evernote, chuck it into something that we will convert. In fact there is another application, we will put a link in the show notes, to something called QuickCursor and what QuickCursor will do, it’s another application…

Rob Borley:
Remember we are only covering four applications, so save it.

Paul Boag:
Save some. There is another application I use which is called Byword, right. We will put a link in the show notes. Byword is a – it’s just a Word processor essentially, but it’s one of those full screen, no-distraction kind of things and you can – essentially it takes Markdown and will display it and you can export it to HTML, which is great. So what I do is I use QuickCursor, right, which allows you to have keyboard shortcuts to pass content from one application to another. So I could be – I keep the article in Evernote but I know that the text editor is shitting that. So I go into the article, select the article, hit my key combination, it pops up in Byword. I finish the article in Byword, just close the application down and it’s pumped back into Evernote automatically. How unnecessarily complicated.

Rob Borley:
Yeah, I’ve gone cross-eyed.

Marcus Lillington:
I am sat back. I’m in the distance. I don’t care. This is why I don’t use it.

Rob Borley:

Can Evernote please just fix the text editor?

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Rob Borley:
Please.

Paul Boag:
Or, just write plain text.

Rob Borley:
Yeah.

Paul Boag:
That’s your other alternative, isn’t it?

Rob Borley:
Yeah.

Paul Boag:
Just keep your formatting really basic. But, you are right. It has got a shocking text editor. But, there you go. So, for website owners, it’s a great place to keep ideas. It’s a great place to keep articles that you have read but also ones that you are writing. It’s a great place for inspiration. If you see a website that’s got some element in it you really like, it’s great for keeping little snippets of statistics that you need to be able to quote in order to be able to justify, whatever it is that you want to do. Even for things like – I keep, like, marketing opportunities in there. So, if I’m – if I want to, for example, get my website featured on a certain – Smashing Magazine or wherever else and I keep a note of correspondents, almost use it as a very – like CRN tool of the kind of correspondence that’s gone back and forth between me and those people because you can send emails to it as well; you could forward emails….

Marcus Lillington:
I had a question.

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
So, obviously, you can set….

Paul Boag:
We’ve talked about Evernote far more than….

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah, we’re well into – loads of times but anyway. Obviously, you can navigate by search.

Paul Boag:
Yes.

Marcus Lillington:
You go back and think “Ooh! That thing I looked at…”

Paul Boag:
Yes.

Marcus Lillington:
Can you create categories and stuff like different buckets to shove things in?

Paul Boag:
Yes, you can have two layers essentially. You can have notebooks, alright? So, I’ve got a home notebook and a work notebook and a cool products notebook and things like that. And, then you can have stacks of notebooks. So, for me, I’ve got like an “archive” stack and then I’ve got a “working-on” stack, if that makes sense, where you can drag stuff. And, then obviously, you can tag things as well.

Marcus Lillington:
Yes.

Paul Boag:
So, you can be as sophisticated as you want to be. But, to be honest, because this is so powerful, it’s almost like email. It’s not worth filing email these days….

Marcus Lillington:
No, not at all.

Paul Boag:
…because it’s so easy to search.

Marcus Lillington:
Inbox, zero. Basically, you chuck the 2,000 into an archive folder….

Paul Boag:
Yes, that’s it done. Never read them; it’s fine. Ooh, I just thought of a really good tool we can add to the list, which is an email tool but that’s not really to do web design is it?

Marcus Lillington:
Why not? We’re having one cool or one other one?

Paul Boag:
One random one, alright.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah.

Paul Boag:
Okay. Talking of random ones, let’s move on to our final app. So, Marcus, you’ll be pleased to hear that our final tool is about Evernote.

Marcus Lillington:
Okay.

Everclip

Paul Boag:
It’s a mobile app. Have you discovered EverClip?

Rob Borley:
I have not used it.

Paul Boag:
You’ve got – do you know what it does?

Rob Borley:
I do now.

Marcus Lillington:
Is it a bit like clipping up your hair?

Paul Boag:
EverClip – no, it’s not you, moron! Yeah, I just completely forgot what I was talking about. Oh, EverClip, what it does! Yes! Essentially, what it allows you to do is collect clips together, a clipboard, right? So, if you copy something, it’ll go into EverClip, right? And, then it’d go from EverClip, on to Evernote. So, it’s a quick way of getting stuff into Evernote. Now, you might think “but why can’t I just copy and paste into Evernote?”

Marcus Lillington:
Yes.

Paul Boag:
Of course, you can. Where it’s useful is let’s say you’re reading an article, right? What you can do – the normal way of doing it – or the way I used to do it is you’re reading an article, you go “ooh, I like that bit in the article so I’m going to copy that”, open up Evernote, create a note for it, then put a link into the actual article and where it is so you’ve got the ref – the source for that. Then, I copy my little clip in, right? Then, I go back into the original app, I go on to the – carry on reading. “Ooh, there is another good bit!” I’ll copy that and I go back into Evernote, open up the app – the note again, put in the next one and so on and so on. What you do is you launch EverClip, right? Then, you leave it running in the background. You go into your article, you’re reading your article, “Ooh, I like that bit!” Copy and it goes into EverClip. Next bit, copy, goes into clip EverClip, copy, so on, so on, so on until you finish your article. Then, you go into EverClip and you can say “I want that one, that one, that one”, put them all together in one note and it puts the source URL in and everything for you. So, it’s a great way of just grabbing content. And, you can mix and match. It doesn’t all need to be from the same article. You could take – you are on a webpage and you say I want the image from this webpage and I want this bit of text but I don’t want the rest. So, put those into EverClip and then it goes – you just open up EverClip when you’re finished, send it off to Evernote. So, it’s a really cool app and the reason that I like it is because it is your fancy rule – no, the very simple rule. It’s about what makes a good app. It does one thing really well. It does – it’s integrated natively so it’s integrated into the copy and paste function so anything you copy goes straight into the app and it just gets out of your way. And, the – actually the interface for the application is really minimal. It really has very, very little in it other than a kind of essential list of things that you’ve copied – I’m just opening it now. Look, this is – I’m showing you guys.

Marcus Lillington:
Yes.

Paul Boag:
It’s essentially a list of all the different copied items and I could go on that one, that one – have you noticed that you can never click on the iPhone from an angle…

Rob Borley:
Yes, never do it….

Paul Boag:
…and that one and you could set the order you want them in and then just click and then off it goes to Evernote, job done!

Rob Borley:
Very clever!

Paul Boag:
I just think that’s brilliant. It’s a really clever, simple app that does one thing and does it really well. I think it’s like 69 pence or something.

Rob Borley:
That’s extortion!

Paul Boag:
I know!

Marcus Lillington:
Did you talk about the cost of – oh, Evernote is free, isn’t it?

Paul Boag:
Evernote is free.

Marcus Lillington:
So….

Paul Boag:
So, you’ve got – Shadow is free. So, all the ones today except EverClip are free, and EverClip is like 69 pence.

Marcus Lillington:
Okay.

Paul Boag:
So that about wraps it up then for this week, which is really cool. I was, at this point, going to ask people to let others know that the show is back on.

Marcus Lillington:
But, you don’t want them to…?

Paul Boag:
But, I don’t – I have decided don’t want to. Essentially what happened is, when we took our hiatus, it was around the same time that The Big Web Show started with Jeffrey Zeldman.

Marcus Lillington:
Yes.

Paul Boag:
And, essentially, he took all of our listeners. Now, I went around his house and knocked on his door and asked, “If I could have them back please, mister?” And, he said no and told me that I was a pesky kid and to get off his lawn. So, I think what we’ll do and is we’ll be stealth and the six of us, because there’s six listeners and us, we’ll creep around his house and egg it. And, we’ll take that kind of approach to it. So that’s – so don’t tell anyone that we’re doing this show, least of all Jeffrey Zeldman. And – he’s getting old, bless him.

Rob Borley:
Not long of this world.

Paul Boag:
Yes. We’d just wait until he dies, I think, and then we’ll have all his listeners back….

Rob Borley:
Pick up the pieces.

Paul Boag:
This is like sacrilege.

Marcus Lillington:
Obviously, I can’t believe what you’re saying!

Paul Boag:
So, all that’s left really is Marcus’ joke.

Marcus Lillington:
Yes. I’ve spent most of this show to find something half decent.

Paul Boag:
I don’t understand! It’s like the whole of the Internet.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah, you would – you try it!

Paul Boag:
Right, you do that. And, I will read this….

Marcus Lillington:
This is called ‘A Pirate at the Local Bar Discusses His Past’, like you, you meet a pirate.

A seaman meets a pirate in a bar and talks to the – and the talk turns to their adventures on the sea. The seaman notes that the pirate has a peg-leg, a hook, and an eye patch. The seaman asks, “So, how did you end up with the peg-leg?” The pirate replies, “We were in a storm at sea” – I’m not going to do a pirate voice, by the way…

Paul Boag:
I just need to do my normal voice.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah, Paul, you can tell this one. “And, I was swept overboard into a school of sharks. Just as my men were pulling me up, a shark bit my leg off, like they do.” “Wow!” said the seaman. “What about your hook”? “Well”, replied the pirate, “we were boarding an enemy ship and we were battling other sailors with swords; one of the enemy cut my hand off.”

I nearly said head then. This is the usual delivery style.

“Incredible!” remarked the seaman. “How did you get the eye patch”? “A seagull dropping fell in my eye,” replied the pirate. “You lost your eye to a seagull dropping?” the sailor asked incredulously. “Well,” said the pirate, “it was the first day I had my hook”.

Paul Boag:
That’s quite funny actually.

Rob Borley:
Well done, it was worth the wait.

Paul Boag:
Okay, here’s my attempt, alright? From a quick…

Marcus Lillington:
Oh, no!

Paul Boag:
Why was the font tag an orphan? Because it didn’t have a font family. It’s a CSS joke.

Rob Borley:
I think you need to be a designer to get that.

Paul Boag:
That’s hilarious.

Marcus Lillington:
It’s so not.

Paul Boag:
Everybody listening –

Rob Borley:
Five people are laughing right now.

Paul Boag:
Oh, it’s gone down to five? Or, are you presuming one of them is not listening.

Rob Borley:
One of them isn’t a designer.

Marcus Lillington:
Okay. Surely it’s half of that because it was a fairly poor joke as well.

Paul Boag:
It was a wonderful joke! That’s witty and insightful. No, I liked your pirate one. That was good.

Marcus Lillington:
Pirate jokes, can’t go wrong.

Paul Boag:
So, we’ll be back next week!

Marcus Lillington:
Yes.

Paul Boag:
With more apps! What was it? Awesome apps and terrific tools! I have to get that in again.

Marcus Lillington:
Mr. Alliteration over there.

Paul Boag:
I am very proud. Alright, well, talk to you guys next week. Don’t forget; please, please, please, don’t tell anyone about our show but do go and start submitting apps. Otherwise, it’s going to be the shortest season in the history.

Marcus Lillington:
Not so short. The amount of apps you use, Paul. We’ll probably get – manage to do about 20 shows before we use somebody else’s idea.

Paul Boag:
That’s not fair! And, anyway, I have used most of them in this show.

Marcus Lillington:
True.

Paul Boag:
Far more than four. Alright, thank you very much for listening, guys, and speak to you again next week. Bye!

These amazing show notes have been transcribed by our friends at Pods in Print. If you need transcription done, I cannot recommend them highly enough.

  • http://twitter.com/keith_andersen Keith Andersen

    Great to see you guys back on a more consistent basis. Love that it’s going weekly and the “Whatever we want” format will keep it fresh and inviting each episode. I look forward to future episode.

  • Jordan Santiago

    Hey guys, love the podcast- To shed some light on the SVG thing, I’ll quote Kate McInnes’s “Rockstar Icon Designer” book:

    “A known issue with Adobe Illustrator and the .SVG format is the option to embed an.AI file within a .SVG to make it easier to open and edit at a later date; one problem with this is cross compatibility with other vector editors such as Inkscape.”

    It’s possible to fix though, as she says, “…when exporting an .SVG file from Adobe Illustrator, uncheck the options “Preserve Adobe Illustrator Editing” and “Optimize for Adobe SVG Viewer” in the “Save File” dialogue box.” , However, I doubt many people have figured out that fix. (I never knew about it…)

    I had always steered away from SVG myself, but I think now I will take a look into using it the next chance I get!

  • http://www.facebook.com/roger.scoppie Roger Scoppie

    A very welcome return to waffle-mode. Just as informative as the tight-focus episodes but with the bonus of free-er interaction allowing Paul and Marcus’s distinctive voices to play of each other to excellent effect.
    (Not to neglect Rob’s contributions, but it’s the P/M teamwork that gives the show its flavour.)

  • http://www.crisialu.co.uk/ David Hughes

    Hey guys, listened to the podcast for the first time yesterday, really enjoyed it. :)
    Just one suggestion – any chance you could put the list of relevant links above the show notes in addition to embedding them all in the transcript? Would make it easier to navigate. Cheers!

  • http://twitter.com/David__Turner David Turner

    Just listened to this Podcast. Thanks. RE: Chrome window min width. I use the developer tab docked to the right. As well as being convenient it lets me scale the window width to below 340px (down to nothing if you like)

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