TinyPNG, Twitter Boostrap, SocialSafe and Day One

Paul gets over excited about audio effects, Marcus proves clueless about Twitter bootstrap and we both think TinyPNG is the dogs bollocks.

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On this weeks show:

Paul Boag:
Hello and welcome to Baogworld.com, the podcast for those involved in designing, developing, and running websites on a daily basis. I’m Paul.

Marcus Lillington:
I’m Marcus.

Paul Boag:
And we’re here again; it’s just two of us this week.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah.

Paul Boag:
It’s just the two of us…

Marcus Lillington:
Oh stop it now. Stop it.

Paul Boag:
We can make it if we try… What? What did I do? What did I do? How come you get to sing and I don’t?

Marcus Lillington:
I don’t sing.

Paul Boag:
I’ve heard you sing.

Marcus Lillington:
I don’t sing on this podcast.

Paul Boag:
Oh, okay.

Marcus Lillington:
And you don’t get to sing things like Just The Two Of Us to me.

Paul Boag:
Why? Are you not sure about your sexuality?

Marcus Lillington:
I’m comfortable with my inner … whatever.

Paul Boag:
Your “inner whatever?”

Marcus Lillington:
Perfectly comfortable, thank you Paul.

Paul Boag:
Perfectly.

Marcus Lillington:
Still repulses me.

Paul Boag:
What just me personally? I personally repulse you? Ah, finally after all these years you’ve told me the truth. So here we are, we’re back again. Just two of us this week, we’e got no Leigh, we’ve got no nobody; we’re all alone.

Marcus Lillington:
Well we’re not, we could just go and drag somebody up from downstairs but – we hadn’t thought of that, had we?

Paul Boag:
Well no, I asked Dan and he said, ‘no, I don’t want to.’

Marcus Lillington:
Why?

Paul Boag:
Apparently he’s busy or something.

Marcus Lillington:
Oh.

Paul Boag:
I know, it’s such a poor excuse, having to work for a living. But I do want to get him on the show because he’s got some great little tools he was showing me earlier that…

Marcus Lillington:
Cool.

Paul Boag:
…that I nearly included in this week’s show and I thought no, I’ll wait for him to appear and allow him to take the glory for his discoveries.

Marcus Lillington:
Yes. Yes, you should do because I don’t know anything about anything you were talking about on this series. So you should have somebody who kind of does.

Paul Boag:
Yeah, true. We’ve started to move on now to user suggestions, which is really good. Because we’ve got – this week we’ve got – because I put up – finally got around to put up the season’s homepage, at boagworld.com/season/4 or if you’re lazy you can just put boagworld.com/apps will also work. And essentially I‘ve got people to start suggesting tools and it’s got manic. Got so many, so many comments, really great contributions and lots of votes and yeah it’s all good. So if you have a suggestion of what we should be including on the show, if you have an app that you want to see featured, go along to boagworld.com/apps and submit it as a comment and then persuade all of your friends to vote it up so that it gets seen and included on the show. Some really great stuff.

Marcus Lillington:
Yes, looking at it now. Why would you be lazy if you just wanted to type in /apps. Surely that would make you efficient?

Paul Boag:
Picky. Because I say so.

Marcus Lillington:
Right, yeah, yeah.

Paul Boag:
Yes. So – I’ve forgotten what I was saying. Yes, so basically go along and make suggestions. There’s already been a little bit of competitiveness going on. I’ve already seen people trying to round up votes for their various apps.

Marcus Lillington:
Are there people on here that work for these various apps?

Paul Boag:
Oh yes, yeah. One of the ones we are featuring was posted by somebody that actually produced the app, but they managed to get enough people to vote it up that I feel obliged to include on the show. So it’s probably just everybody from within the company that have all voted it up. But it does look quite good, so I am including it.

Marcus Lillington:
Cool.

Paul Boag:
So yes, there’s gaming of the system going on already; which I’m pleased to see.

Marcus Lillington:
It’s going on forever, I’m bored now. I’m bored of looking at the page now.

Paul Boag:
Yeah, yeah. Oh no – it’s so – too much if you read all of it. But it’s worth scanning down because obviously we’re not going to include all of the apps that are being suggested. So it’s a good chance to find other cool apps that may help you in your career in the web community.

Marcus Lillington:
Superb.

Paul Boag:
Superb. Right. So shall we push on to the first app?

Marcus Lillington:
I’m trying to think of something else to talk about.

Paul Boag:
I feel like we’re a bit lacking this week.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah.

Paul Boag:
In waffle and in – you know – and amusement.

Marcus Lillington:
I’m going away to Cornwall soon. That’s always quite a nice thing.

Paul Boag:
Nobody cares about that. Why are you..?

Marcus Lillington:
Everyone likes Cornwall.

Paul Boag:
Yes but – everybody likes Cornwall but not everybody likes the fact that you’re going away to it and they’re not.

Marcus Lillington:
They might be. I can remind them of how nice it is.

Paul Boag:
And anyway, people outside of the U.K. won’t like Cornwall because they won’t know what it’s like.

Marcus Lillington:
But they’ll – they’ll kind of have a – probably they will think of smugglers and Poldark and things like that.

Paul Boag:
Poldark?

Marcus Lillington:
See you don’t even know what that is. I’m showing my age here.

Paul Boag:
What’s Poldark? Is it some –

Marcus Lillington:
70s TV program which was set in the – I don’t know – ships and smugglers and stuff.

Paul Boag:
I suspect it’s on Netflix

Marcus Lillington:
Swords! Swords, yeah?

Paul Boag:
Swords?

Marcus Lillington:
I didn’t actually like it at all but it was kind of like –

Paul Boag:
Right. But it was set in Cornwall, wasn’t it?

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah. So…

Paul Boag:
All I know is, everybody just if you don’t come from Cornwall or know about Cornwall, just so you know that everybody in Cornwall speaks like…

Marcus Lillington:
Like Paul.

Paul Boag:
Like Pirates of the Caribbean. Which is bizarre, because none of them are from Cornwall. But there you go.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah.

Paul Boag:
I don’t quite know quite how that works.

Marcus Lillington:
Yes, true.

Paul Boag:
But there you go. So that’s nothing to do with anything and not to do with web design. There is lots of things I’m getting really excited about at the moment in web design. But that – so I’m in – my in-subject to the moment, as you know from my entry this morning…

Marcus Lillington:
I do, I do yes.

Paul Boag:
Is the subject of web governance, and I’m tweeting and writing on that.

Marcus Lillington:
WOM. WOM.

Paul Boag:
No, that’s web – what was WOM? I can’t remember what WOM stood for now.

Marcus Lillington:
Web Organization Management or something like that.

Paul Boag:
Yeah something like that. So, basically the idea that I’m fed up with the fact that web teams within organizations don’t seem to have any power to actually run their own websites. So I’m now making it a crusade to sort them out. And then – it’s really funny, I posted on this subject and everybody’s going ‘yeah, yeah I really agree. Yeah, yeah it’s really true.’

Marcus Lillington:
But they are not going to do anything about it.

Paul Boag:
And then everybody went ‘yeah, but it’s not that easy.’ Which is true, it’s not that easy. But you shouldn’t give up people; we shall overcome. So that’s something that I am – if you want to find out more about, if you go to boagworld.com you will find various posts on that by me ranting uncontrollably. I seem to be in full rant stream at the moment.

Marcus Lillington:
That’s cool.

Paul Boag:
I go through phases of doing this.

Marcus Lillington:
As long as there’s some kind of substance behind it.

Paul Boag:
Well – substance?

Marcus Lillington:
Well actually, yeah, who am I kidding?

Paul Boag:
You are confusing me. Right, okay. Can we now move on? Is that enough of introduction for you? I feel like we’re padding the show, Marcus.

Marcus Lillington:
Timing the waffle, yeah just about.

Paul Boag:
We’re padding. We’ll move on now to our first app.

Marcus Lillington:
Pad, pad, pad.

Paul Boag:
I’ve decided this is a reoccurring theme, you know.

Marcus Lillington:
What?

Paul Boag:
That over the entire time we’ve been doing the podcast I’ve been wanting to make them shorter and shorter and you’ve wanted to pad them and pad them and pad them.

Marcus Lillington:
Oh that’s not strictly true.

Paul Boag:
You think people listen for your witty interjections. That’s what you think.

Marcus Lillington:
Yes, I’m right.

Paul Boag:
It’s not true, you know. I actually get people – in fact I can remember one that said –

Marcus Lillington:
Or annoyingly interrupting you.

Paul Boag:
One that said, and I quote, “stop Marcus interrupting you with waffle and let you get to the point.”

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah but that was probably somebody who wasn’t very intelligent.

Paul Boag:
So intelligent people like your inane waffle. Fair enough; if that’s what gets you through the day.

Marcus Lillington:
That was a joke, by the way, listeners.

Paul Boag:
So this first – this first – are you calling our listeners thick?

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah I said it was a joke. I just thought – best – better qualify that in case they really are thick.

Paul Boag:
So shocking news, here first, Marcus thinks you’re all thick.

TinyPNG

Screen capture of TinyPNG website

Paul Boag:
Right, so the first app is actually one that you should know about Marcus and you should care about even though it’s actually – I’m putting it as a designer app, I think it’s something that probably a lot of website owners might find useful as well. It’s called TinyPNG.

Marcus Lillington:
TinyPNG?

Paul Boag:
TinyPNG.

Marcus Lillington:
I’ve never heard of it.

Paul Boag:
It’s a free service, although they do like you to donate. It’s tinypng.org and basically it’s just – right, there is a fundamental, stupid thing broken with Photoshop, right.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah.

Paul Boag:
Adobe: fix this. Photoshop is crap at saving out web files.

Marcus Lillington:
Right.

Paul Boag:
Right? You’d think they would have sorted it by now. The web has been around for 15 plus years, or no – why did I say 15 years? It’s been around a lot longer than that

Marcus Lillington:
Well, nearly 20.

Paul Boag:
Near 20. 20 years.

Marcus Lillington:
Well, no, 20 – 21 isn’t it?

Paul Boag:
20 years.

Paul Boag:
Yeah. Yeah. So anyway…

Marcus Lillington:
It was invented in 1991.

Paul Boag:
…I don’t know why I’m finding that so difficult. So admittedly the PNG format hasn’t been around that long but it’s still long enough Adobe. Sort your act out. When it saves out a PNG, it’s humongous. It makes really large PNG files and it’s disgraceful.

Marcus Lillington:
I wonder if it’s the same with Pixelmatorm because I use Pixelmator because I’m not a proper designer.

Paul Boag:
Right.

Marcus Lillington:
But I wonder if it does.

Paul Boag:
Well what you ought to do…

Marcus Lillington:
Is do a test.

Paul Boag:
Let’s do a test right now live on air, because I’ve got a couple of tools here.

Marcus Lillington:
Ooh, how exciting. I haven’t got Pixelmator on this machine so we can’t.

Paul Boag:
Well it’s – ah. Have I got Pixelmator? Let me have a look. Yes I do. Here we go.

Marcus Lillington:
You can do it then.

Paul Boag:
All right, I’m doing a test. I’m trying to open Photoshop and Pixelmator at the same time, that’s not a good thing, is it? So – shut up. No, no see that’s just making me tense. Right, I need to find an image. This could take a while. This is enough stalling for you, surely?

Marcus Lillington:
Yes, this is…

Paul Boag:
This is time wasting, making the program – right, I’m going to open a PSD in Pixelmator and then I’m going to open the same PSD in Photoshop.

Right. Export as a PNG file, next. Okay. Boagworld torn paper, save to desktop. Okay, so that’s done it in Pixelmator. Close Pixelmator. Open the same file in Photoshop. Archive, torn paper. Yeah don’t feel like you have to fill in or anything while I’m doing this. Yeah, just sit completely silent and put all the pressure on me.

Marcus Lillington:
I was having a little daydream actually.

Paul Boag:
Were you?

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah.

Paul Boag:
This is –

Marcus Lillington:
Guess where I was?

Paul Boag:
Cornwall, by any chance?

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah, I was. I was in Cornwall.

Paul Boag:
Torn paper…with a dash –

Marcus Lillington:
I thought you would be a bit quicker than this basically.

Paul Boag:
Well I’m trying to do two applications at once. What do you want from me? Here we go, right. Oh, no I don’t want to install that now. Right, so we’ve got one that is exported from Photoshop, which by default is – stupid window. Is 16k.

Marcus Lillington:
Okay.

Paul Boag:
And then another one from Pixelmator. It’s 25k. So Pixelmator is even worse than Photoshop.

Marcus Lillington:
Boo.

Paul Boag:
Right, so next what I’m going to try doing is dragging those two files – let’s just take the bigger one actually, hang on, instead of doing both. 25k, we are going to drag it now into – it’s reduced it by 55%.

Marcus Lillington:
Ooh.

Paul Boag:
Down to 11k. That’s pretty impressive.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah, definitely. Well I might use it then.

Paul Boag:
So – well, I’ve forgotten what it’s called. Tinypng.org.

Marcus Lillington:
Tiny PNG.

Paul Boag:
Which I think is really, really, really, really good. Let me just try one more thing, because you remember we talked about Codekit?

Marcus Lillington:
We did, yes.

Paul Boag:
And about how Codekit does a similar thing. Let’s see if it does as well. See, no, Codekit is nowhere near as good. It managed to compress that image by 21%, compared to 55%. So it’s even better than Codekit. There you go.

Marcus Lillington:
That’s actually quite useful.

Paul Boag:
Empirical evidence people.

Marcus Lillington:
We’ve come up with something that’s quite useful. Well we didn’t come up with it, obviously.

Paul Boag:
Yes it’s ours. And we take credit for all the apps on this show. So empirical evidence that tinypng.org works. And it’s really easy to use as well. What’s really cool because you just literally drag the file into it

Marcus Lillington:
In the rectangle.

Paul Boag:
In the little draggy thing where it says “drop your PNG file here.” I thought that this was a desktop app because I’ve used similar desktop apps that do the same but the fact that it’s web based, I mean that’s just fandabidozi.

Marcus Lillington:
Right clever.

Paul Boag:
So that’s Tiny PNG, our recommendation. There are other PNG compressors out there, but this is the best according to the boagworld community and according to our tests.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah this particular test here.

Paul Boag:
This thorough test.

Marcus Lillington:
Exactly.

Paul Boag:
Which tests it against one other application which really doesn’t even specialize in PNG.

Marcus Lillington:
Which has nothing to do with that. Yeah there’s probably like five that matter. But anyway…

Paul Boag:
So it’s now –

Marcus Lillington:
…it’s got a nice name.

Paul Boag:
If you know of a better one, post it in the comments on today’s show notes, which would be – oh I don’t know, work it out – what episode are we at?

Marcus Lillington:
Four.

Paul Boag:
Four. So boagworld.com/season/4 and then you can find episode four from there. All right.

Marcus Lillington:
Season four, episode four. There you go.

Paul Boag:
That’s very nice and roundy. Right, shall we move on?

Marcus Lillington:
Let’s do that.

Twitter Bootstrap

Twitter Bootstrap website

Paul Boag:
So, our developer recommendation today by massive majority is Twitter Bootstrap. So obviously Marcus you know all about Twitter Bootstrap, don’t you?

Marcus Lillington:
Is massive majority a person?

Paul Boag:
My username, massive majority. That’s actually quite funny, well done.

Marcus Lillington:
See, this is what people listen for.

Paul Boag:
Oh is it? And well distracted from my question about the fact that you knew all about this already.

Marcus Lillington:
I do, I’m currently thinking it across the airwaves.

Paul Boag:
Ah, okay. So what Marcus is telling me psychically –

Marcus Lillington:
I know what Twitter is.

Paul Boag:
Hm?

Marcus Lillington:
I know what Twitter is.

Paul Boag:
And you know what a Bootstrap is?

Marcus Lillington:
I do.

Paul Boag:
But the two combined is tricky.

Marcus Lillington:
Not a clue.

Paul Boag:
So this is the guys at Twitter trying to help us be a web designer by making things just a little bit easier for us by providing their – what they describe as their “sleek, intuitive and powerful front-end framework for faster and easier web development.” So now you know Marcus.

So let me explain.

Marcus Lillington:
What’s that for?

Paul Boag:
Yeah right, so it’s kind of shortcuts. There’s so much that you have to do in – when you’re building a website. And you have to do it kind of again and again and again and again. So you’re always resetting typography, you’re always creating a grid system, there’s common stuff that you need to do in terms of JavaScript bits and pieces, you might – you want to make it responsive, da da da da da da da. So there are various frameworks around that kind of help you kick start the process. So there are more basic ones that focus on resetting the browser and giving you kind of basic functionality and then are more and more sophisticated ones. So there’s – for example I use HTML5 Boilerplate quite a lot which gets browsers behaving across – behaving consistently and it gives you a reset as well and basically codes up certain things for you et cetera. Then there are kind of ones that concentrate on getting you started with the grid system. So a framework that helps you with the grid structures, there is something called Blueprint, that’s an example of that. Oh I should say I had shown notes – links in the show notes.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah.

Paul Boag:
Whatever, I’m just saying.

Marcus Lillington:
Add to show notes here.

Paul Boag:
Add to show notes. No, I have got to say the word link. Because that’s what I’m going to search on, link. A link to the – to link it to…

Marcus Lillington:
Does it say link on all the other shows that we have done so far.

Paul Boag:
Oh shit. Now I don’t know what I was saying. So how am I going to search on it? Oh, disaster. Anyway, so there is all these kind of things. Now Twitter Bootstrap seems to kind of include loads of these kinds of things together. So it’s got a responsive 12 column grid system and it has got dozens of components, JavaScript plug-ins, stuff for typography, form controls et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. It’s all built using – utilizing LESS, which obviously we talked about before on the show and that enables you to do a lot of cool stuff that makes things easier. So it looks really, really good and certainly a lot of people have spoken very highly of it. I haven’t used it and I won’t be using it. So a bit controversial here.

Marcus Lillington:
You like pure coding on a piece of paper first, don’t you?

Paul Boag:
Coding on a piece of paper. I wrote down my code by hand…

Marcus Lillington:
With a pencil.

Paul Boag:
I do, yes, yes absolutely. I go pen now and Tipp-Ex bits out. But I am moving on to a typewriter.

Marcus Lillington:
But that’s why you’re not using it isn’t it? It gets in the way of the creative process.

Paul Boag:
No it’s not. You’re talking bollocks. It’s – I do use these things. I’m a great fan of using stuff that helps shortcut the process. So absolutely, LESS I use. I use HTML Bootstrap. For me personally, and this is no criticism of Bootstrap or anybody else, it goes a little bit too far for me.

Marcus Lillington:
It’s prescriptive.

Paul Boag:
It’s a bit too prescriptive. And something that I have seen written about it is that a lot of Twitter Bootstrap sites, you can tell that they’re built using Twitter Bootstrap, because of – the form controls look a certain way or, you know – I’m not a great fan of that personally. Also, with things like it’s got a 12 column grid built into it but I don’t necessarily always want a 12 column grid. Also, you have to use specific class names and I’m fine doing that for prototyping, something like this would be brilliant for prototyping but I think for more – for final production work I would just like my code to be a little bit more cleaner. Also, even with the stuff that I use at the moment like Boilerplate and jQuery and stuff like that you – often you can end up feeling – hang on a minute I don’t really understand everything I have coded here. And I think as soon as you get into those realms, not really understanding all the codes you are working with, I think it can begin to get a bit dangerous because if something goes wrong, you then don’t know how to fix it. So I’m kind of – I’m okay for other – but I’m not criticizing it. I’m just saying for me personally I don’t think it’s the way that I would like to go. I don’t believe. But then I was a person that at one stage said I would never use a Mac. So I wouldn’t hold me too much to this, but certainly I’m not entirely convinced by it. Let’s put it like that. But I know a lot of people are. Let’s see what some of the people have said about it. I’m just having a quick look through. It’s an interesting option for a framework that seems to have lots of customizational add-ons, which is good. It’s great if you need a nice, clean interface because it invites interaction through JavaScript and CSS. Again it implies that it has quite a big influence on the interface which may be alright depending on what you are doing I guess. It even supplies a variety of options for people of varying skill levels and a couple of base layouts and even a responsive one for you to work off of. Again, great – depending on your skill level this might be great.

What else have we got, I really – somebody else, Travis is saying I really like Twitter Bootstrap. I’m actually using it for wire framing and prototyping. Now I agree with him on that. I think that’s a good use of it. And he is saying it helps him to bridge the gap between Visio or OmniGraffle generated PDF files and the final code. The scaffolding is really easy to use and there are a lot of common widgets. So it feels to me like it’s almost more like a replacement for Axure.

Marcus Lillington:
Axure.

Paul Boag:
Axure, that we talked about last week, insert link into the show notes, then it is okay kind of for use on a live environment.

Marcus Lillington:
So what – but all right, so sell that to me, why would I use this instead of Axure? It’s cheaper…

Paul Boag:
It’s cheaper, I mean I think is the primary one. Also I suspect you probably can find that with Axure…

Marcus Lillington:
You can do more.

Paul Boag:
A, you will be able to do more with this because you’re basically unlimited. B, I think you might find that you can reuse bits of it in the final site as well.

Marcus Lillington:
Right.

Paul Boag:
Which would be an advantage. But for me personally not something – I would prefer to kind of have Axure, and then have – why do I have such trouble with that name? It’s really weird, and then have this kind of seperate final code build rather than mixing the two. But I’d be interested to see what other people think, whether they agree with me or not on that. It’s interesting nobody so far that I can see in the comments have actually said that it should be used on a final website. Oh, actually, ‘Chee’ has said yes, “absolutely love it, makes my job developing websites so much easier whether it’s a normal site, responsive site or WordPress site.” So it sounds like he uses it actually on final sites, which is fine, but personally I wouldn’t. So again I’d love to hear in the comments, just carry this conversation on in the comments as to whether you feel like things like Twitter Bootstrap should actually be used on a live site or whether it’s more of a prototyping tool. It’s interesting mind. I mean it’s just, for me it’s just so great that people like Twitter are putting this kind of stuff out there and I –

Marcus Lillington:
What’s in it for Twitter other than ‘we’re really cool’ or is that what the tool’s for?

Paul Boag:
I think that’s it basically. There is nothing in it. They just do it – well to be honest they had to build this stuff anyway for them, I suspect is what’s happening there and they are just open sourcing it to everybody. Another example of that – I’m desperately trying to remember the name of it. I think it was Clear LESS. Yes, it was. So another example of that is Clear Left have just released something called Clearless and put – linked it in show notes here for that, which is essentially then, they’ve created a load of add-ons to LESS of kind of reusable code, of stuff they use internally all of the time which kind of utilizes various things that LESS does. So it’s various mixings and that kind of stuff which – I definitely will be using that, because I can look through it and I can understand everything that’s there and it makes sense to me, so yeah I will make use of it. It’s where I don’t really understand what’s happening. There are lots of other things like that. We ought to talk about Compass for SASS at some point, a link in show notes here. But I won’t do that right now, we’ll get into Compass on another occasion because that’s very cool as well.

Marcus Lillington:
Okay.

Paul Boag:
So lots of cool developy stuff. All very nice and shiny. So shall we move on to something for those website owners amongst us?

Socialsafe

SocialSafe website

Paul Boag:
And so we come to a tool for those website owners amongst us. In fact I think this is probably of interest to anybody whether you’re a designer, developer or a website owner but I think there is a maybe a business logic behind using this tool for those of you that are website owners. It’s a tool called SocialSafe and it’s actually the tool that promoted itself. The owners posted on the site and lots of people have voted it up. I don’t know whether they were employees of the company or whether they were real users that are enthusiastic about it. Either way it got my attention.

Marcus Lillington:
Is it about being safe when you are socializing?

Paul Boag:
It means wearing a condom at all social gatherings even if you’re not having sex. So yeah. No, it’s a great tool. Basically what it does is backup your social networks, right. So you can download and unify Facebook, Facebook pages, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, Google Plus, all of that kind of stuff into a single local application. So all of your history of everything that you’ve ever Tweeted, Instagrammed, Facebooked or whatever else is all held locally on your machine, right. It’s an Air application, which means it’s available on Mac or PC. I think even Linux has Air. I’m not quite sure of – I might have just made that up. Who cares about Linux anyway? Now I’m going to get in trouble. Right, this is the first of the apps this week that actually costs some money, however. Disastrous.

Marcus Lillington:
Oh. Oh yeah, so it does.

Paul Boag:
So basically it kind of varies between – depending on how big your organization is, how many Facebook pages and profiles and all that kind of stuff you’ve got. The most basic version, one profile, Facebook or Twitter is $3.99 a year. Hardly going to break the bank. The most expensive option, which is 10 Facebook pages, so 10 profiles is $13.99 a year. So it’s not one that’s going to cost you too much, that’s certainly true, I think that’s a really good price for it. So that is SocialSafe. Now, my problem is and I put this to all the people that said how great it is, is why, right. For me you see social networks are a transitory thing. When I update Twitter, it’s not like writing a blog post that I’ve spent hours crafting. I’ve just kind of wacked it up there, I don’t care, it comes and it goes, the moment has passed past and all is good with the world again. What are – you looked like you were about to say something?

Marcus Lillington:
Yes.

Paul Boag:
Go on then.

Marcus Lillington:
The fact that anyone is pointing to your well-crafted blog post makes it valuable as part of a – someone’s library…

Paul Boag:
I have no idea what you are talking about. Try again so I understand. Speak in intelligent English.

Marcus Lillington:
The value in somebody’s Twitter feed for example would be the different links that they’re pointing to.

Paul Boag:
Why would I want to – but my point is, why do I…

Marcus Lillington:
Why do you want to save it?

Paul Boag:
Yeah, why do I want to save it? For posterity. Was the question I had.

Marcus Lillington:
It depends – because some people’s would be of value. You would be interested in the future to look back and see what….

Paul Boag:
Yeah but I’m not Barack Obama.

Marcus Lillington:
…what Obama Tweeted. Yeah, but no you – I don’t know where the line to draw is on that and also maybe to your great grandson, your Twitter feed of 2012 might be something of interest to them.

Paul Boag:
Possibly. I mean, it’s interesting because I do back up –

Marcus Lillington:
I think there is value in it. It’s hard to put my finger on why.

Paul Boag:
Well actually the community did really well, because although I said why, I actually do do this. All of my – I use IFTTT– T– T– T– T– T that we talked about last week.

Marcus Lillington:
That one, yeah, yeah yeah.

Paul Boag:
And then I – that backs up everything to Evernote for me, right. But I don’t really know, or I didn’t know why I did it. What the point was, right. I just did it because it was easy to do and so I did it anyway. But the community said a couple of things. From a personal point of view, me, Paul Boag: , or you Marcus Lillington:

Marcus Lillington:
It’s part of you.

Paul Boag:
Okay that wasn’t what I was going to say but I – fair enough.

Marcus Lillington:
Carry on, carry on. I’ll shut up.

Paul Boag:
But I think the value to us is where you go – I saw that link at some point. I think I Tweeted about that and now you can search it.

Marcus Lillington:
I’m being a bit deeper and hippier about that.

Paul Boag:
You are being deeper and hippier and I don’t give a shit about that

Marcus Lillington:
That’s true, that’s true, yeah.

Paul Boag:
I want to refer back to all this stuff because Twitter search and Facebook search only go back so far. This has it all in one place. Yeah, I get that. Really neat and tidy, love it, love it, love it..

Marcus Lillington:
Could I just make a comment on that?

Paul Boag:
Is it going to be a hippy comment because if it is I don’t care.

Marcus Lillington:
No a comment on that point.

Paul Boag:
On that point, right.

Marcus Lillington:
I’m kind of the feeling – I haven’t been doing – even though I’ve probably have been Tweeting for five years, it still feels like a year.

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
So it doesn’t feel like I’ve got loads of content to look back and search on.

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
But that’s wrong. I should be thinking of this as same as email.

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
I’ve got every email I’ve ever written. And it’s exactly the – for exactly the same reason, so it can be searched on later.

Paul Boag:
Yeah. I mean, also it’s quite nice as well – there was another application that I used for a while called Memento. Do you remember me talking about Memento? Link in the show notes here.

Marcus Lillington:
Yes I do.

Paul Boag:
Which was a great app because that basically – did pull it all in and put it on a calendar, the same as this does. But their angle on it was you could look back and – well, it’s like an automatic diary with no effort put into it. And I could understand it from that point as well: ‘what was I doing this time last year?’ and you can look in, in this, and you can instantly see. So it is really good for that, I can understand that. The other thing that came out of the community and what people were posting online about it when I pushed over this is from a business point of view there is actually a kind of obligation to do this. You’re required to keep email for example for X amount of time after it’s been sent etcetera and I think a lot of companies are now getting into the habit of taking the same attitude with social media. For example, what if somebody said ‘oi you tweeted this and that was incorrect and I’m taking you to court over it’ you need a record of all those tweets and social media and that kind of stuff. So there is a business driver here as well.

Marcus Lillington:
I still prefer my hippy legacy stuff.

Paul Boag:
Yeah, well exactly. You’d get on well with Jeremy Keith. He keeps going on about legacy and…

Marcus Lillington:
It’s true.

Paul Boag:
…keeping stuff for the future. Are you one of those hoarders? Do you never throw anything out for the same reason?

Marcus Lillington:
I’m actually a little bit guilty of that. Although I try not – it depends. I think – stuff that you’ve written I think applies – that’s kind of legacy, you should keep it, you should store it and nurture it – well not nurture it but look after it anyway; is of value. I – when I moved house – when I moved into my house in 1989…

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
…we had a really horrible toilet seat in one of the loos. It was like kind of a plastic, maroon-colored thing.

Paul Boag:
Right.

Marcus Lillington:
I was like take that off, hideous. I replaced it with another one that we liked, I put the plastic one in the box that the new one came in and put it in the loft and discovered it 13 years later when we moved. And I just went out and stamped on it and hit it with things and told myself off for being such an idiot.

Paul Boag:
Good for you.

Marcus Lillington:
So I try not to hoard but I think your words, your thoughts in particular are worth hoarding.

Paul Boag:
I mean the thing that I like is, my system of backing up to Evernote works perfectly well and does it. But why I do like this is the fact that you have got this kind of calendar and you can pop back in time to any particular date and you can look at what you were doing that day. You can instantly find anything with this really kind of good search facility rather than the online search facilities that are so shit really.

Marcus Lillington:
Well, unlimited, yeah.

Paul Boag:
Well it is really good. I guess the danger, an application like this, is that it goes away, that they stop supporting it.

Marcus Lillington:
Good point.

Paul Boag:
But there are good sides to that. They’ve kind of addressed that. If it does go away you’ve still got your whole thing locally on the app that’s on your machine.

Marcus Lillington:
Yes, it did say local.

Paul Boag:
And also you can export everything in CSV format. So I’ve noticed somebody within the comments was saying something along the lines of that they actually use that to create a graph of their follower count over time of whether more or less people are following them over time and they can even – then they’ll be able to see ‘okay my tweets went a bit too personal there or my stuff dropped off’ or whatever. So there’s analytics you can do on this as well. So okay, yes, I kind of – after an initial hesitation this does make sense to me as an app and I think at that price, why the hell not really? I mean, $13 a year for the whole thing.

Marcus Lillington:
I won’t buy it even though I approve of it.

Paul Boag:
I approve of this product, but I’m not using it.

Marcus Lillington:
I think saving everyone’s stuff should be – it should be an obligation of government. There you go. I make this stuff up as I go along.

Paul Boag:
Yeah. So hang on a minute. So basically you have just been lecturing about how important it is for legacy and all that bollocks…

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah.

Paul Boag:
…and then you’re not doing it.

Marcus Lillington:
No. Lazy.

Paul Boag:
Oh the complex person that is Marcus – well it’s not lazy. Just download an application and run it. Now that’s interesting. I imagine then you’re going to have to have – ah, I wonder how that works, right. If you don’t open the application is it still backing up or do you need the application open to back up? That’s interesting thought because otherwise you are going to have the app open, because every 3000 tweets or whatever it is…

Marcus Lillington:
But this is all backed up in the cloud, yeah, and your local version is just a local copy kind of thing?

Paul Boag:
I don’t know.

Marcus Lillington:
So if you move laptops for example, which we all do quite regularly, you need to just backup from the cloud again, surely.

Paul Boag:
I’m guessing so. It doesn’t actually – I can’t see that.

Marcus Lillington:
You don’t want to have to carry all your files into a hard drive or something.

Paul Boag:
Like have a big – a big Outlook file that you move from computer to computer. Don’t know – FAQs, let’s have a look at the FAQs. Nothing like researching into things before you start.

Marcus Lillington:
Yes.

Paul Boag:
It doesn’t answer that as an FAQ question. Not that I can see.

Marcus Lillington:
Well that’s a bit poor.

Paul Boag:
Choosing FAQs, ah here we go, choosing Safe.

Marcus Lillington:
Sorry I’m supposed to be padding at the moment, aren’t I? Pad pad pad, pad pad pad.

Paul Boag:
Oh there’s a free version.

Marcus Lillington:
Oh. It’s probably time-limited, isn’t it?

Paul Boag:
The free version has some great basic features for backing up and viewing your Facebook account. Do we want to know the difference? Yes, that’s worth clicking through to isn’t it?

Marcus Lillington:
It certainly is. They’ll love us for this, won’t they. We’ve found the free version!

Paul Boag:
The paid version gives you more exciting features including additional social network – ah, so the basic version only does Facebook. Oh that’s crap

Marcus Lillington:
No it’s not.

Paul Boag:
It is for me.

Marcus Lillington:
It is for me as well, but it’s not a crap thing.

Paul Boag:
No, it wasn’t a criticism. It’s free, you know.

Marcus Lillington:
Paul is reading, everyone, and now he’s making sort of clip-clop noise – horse noises.

Paul Boag:
It’s actually really distracting, you padding while I’m trying to read. Can you be quiet please?

Marcus Lillington:
No I can’t. We’ve got blokes doing up – starting to do the buildings next door to us. There’s diggers and stuff out there. But I can’t –

Paul Boag:
I can’t find the answer to the question. So I don’t know whether it does it locally or in the cloud.

Marcus Lillington:
Maybe someone could tell us.

Paul Boag:
Yes, post the answer because I know that people that made the app are listening to the podcast. So post the answer in the forum thingy – the comments on this show note. Oh God, this is such a shit show.

Right, so we now come, do we not, to our final application of the day.

So we said that we would finish each show by looking at a mobile application that either is kind of good as web designers, you know, it’s useful to us as web designers or alternatively it’s got something in it that we can learn from.

Marcus Lillington:
Or alternatively it’s just really good, we did say.

Paul Boag:
If it’s really good then we can…

Marcus Lillington:
Really good would be the ACB Cricket app for example, which is really good.

Paul Boag:
I’m sure it is.

Marcus Lillington:
And people might be interested in it.

Paul Boag:
I don’t think they would. Why would they?

Marcus Lillington:
Because it’s good.

Paul Boag:
Why is it a good app then? Go on, other than it’s got cricket stuff in it.

Marcus Lillington:
It’s because it does that wonderful thing of showing you the most important information in a really big and highlighted way and you can delve down into more detail if you want it. That’s why it’s good.

Paul Boag:
Right, fair enough. Thanks for that wise words of wisdom that you have shared with us today. Right, so…

Marcus Lillington:
Right, so – right, come on then. What is it that’s going to be more exciting than that?

Paul Boag:
Well actually it’s a follow-on from our conversation about legacy and all of that kind of stuff.

Marcus Lillington:
Oh well I am actually quite interested in this.

Day One

Day One application on mac, iPad and iphone

Paul Boag:
It’s an application called Day One. Have you come across Day One?

Marcus Lillington:
No.

Paul Boag:
Right. So Day One is available for the Mac, the iPhone and the iPad. I like to think of it as – it’s a journaling app, right, for writing a diary.

Marcus Lillington:
Okay. I’m never going to do that.

Paul Boag:
Exactly. That was exactly my response to it but I have kind of -

Marcus Lillington:
A certain amount of vanity is required for a diary.

Paul Boag:
Exactly. But I have kind of…well no, it’s nice to look back on. It’s all that you were saying earlier about looking back on stuff.

Marcus Lillington:
No but you are – it’s just the action of now I’m going to write my diary.

Paul Boag:
Yes. Yeah, no I agree with that. I have – somewhere along the line it got me to rethink it. I don’t know whether it was this app that got me to rethink it or somewhere I have rethought the idea of diary. I know, it goes back to Memento again, right.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah.

Paul Boag:
Because Memento created me a diary with no effort on my part, right. But for whatever reason – I won’t go into that now but I have stopped using Memento. And it just wasn’t working, right. And so I was kind of looking around for something similar and there wasn’t anything but I came across Day One. And I thought, no I’m never going to write a diary, not going to happen. I always start one on holidays and then never finish it, you know, and it just got – but what I have started doing with Day One is I have started treating it like a private Twitter, right. So I tweet to it…

Marcus Lillington:
They are all bastards.

Paul Boag:
Yeah. All of the things that I wouldn’t say on Twitter, the piles are painful again today, that kind of thing.

Marcus Lillington:
But it’s okay to do it on the podcast to hundreds of thousands of people.

Paul Boag:
If only hundreds of thousands listened. But you get the idea, that essentially – it pops up every now and again, just asking me to say whatever I’m doing and I just put in whatever I am currently doing and I tweet through – stuff actually that’s too inane almost to put on – nobody cares that…

Marcus Lillington:
Had toast this morning.

Paul Boag:
Yeah, exactly. But maybe I want to say that in my diary. So I’ve kind of been using it like that but that’s not really why I’m mentioning it on the show because we are not a kind of just a random cool app show.

Marcus Lillington:
But I thought we were on this one.

Paul Boag:
Well okay, we can be if you want to but let me -

Marcus Lillington:
Not every time

Paul Boag:
Absolutely.

Marcus Lillington:
Oh Paul’s falling off his chair.

Paul Boag:
Okay fair enough. It is a really cool app and I do absolutely love it but half the reason I absolutely love it is because it is beautifully and carefully thought through, right. They just added – they’ve added a whole lot of extra features that make it for me. So for example you put photographs in there, you can geo-tag your location. It will automatically look up the weather for you and all these kinds of cool stuff. It’s not the functionality that I care about.

Marcus Lillington:
It just looks gorgeous.

Paul Boag:
It’s the implementations- it’s not even just that – it does look gorgeous, it’s a beautiful app that’s really well designed. It’s got a gorgeous icon that – I buy apps just on the basis of their icons half the time. But it’s the details of the design. And it’s not something you can really describe very well on a podcast but things like if you – you know when you can pull down the document like when you could reach the end of scrolling, right.

Marcus Lillington:
Yes.

Paul Boag:
And it kind of goes a bit further, doesn’t it on the iPhone, it’s got this bouncy thing. Well things like they’ve bothered to put in their logo. So you reveal the logo as you pull down.

Marcus Lillington:
Nice.

Paul Boag:
With the imagery, when you pull down on the image it kind of – it slightly crops your image, it expands out and you can see more of your image, details like that. Detail – the buttons are beautiful, the typography is beautiful. In my view it just exemplifies a beautifully designed app that – where the interface doesn’t get in the way. The interface is really, really understated but it’s so beautifully done that it amazes me. But – and here’s the thing that really sells this app for me. It’s use of sound. Sound for a long time has been a big thing with me. I’m always ‘like why don’t we have more audio feedback on the web?’ I’m a huge fan of audio feedback. And I know people go ‘oh it’s distracting, what if you’re in a work environment?’ Yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
It’s brilliant.

Paul Boag:
Yeah. Exactly.

Marcus Lillington:
Genius.

Paul Boag:
And the whoosh.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah and the whoosh. But it is software but it’s also – well I suppose it’s hardware as well. I don’t know.

Paul Boag:
Yeah thing is – I think audio feedback…

Marcus Lillington:
I’m a huge fan of that, as well.

Paul Boag:
…if it’s done well, is just beautiful. The whoosh when you send an email, the click on and off, all of those types of things, and Day One just have nailed it perfectly. So as you – one of the things you can do is if you kind of pulled down, you can flip to the previous or next item, you can just keep scrolling basically from one to the other and you get this little click as you move from one to the other that’s so satisfying. But here’s the really cool thing about it. You don’t get exactly the same click every time.

Marcus Lillington:
Right.

Paul Boag:
You get this slightly – the pitch of it slightly changes. So it’s got that almost organic feel to it. You know, when you close a door it doesn’t always sound identical every time, does it? And they have done that and it’s so well thought through.

Marcus Lillington:
I’m impressed.

Paul Boag:
You ought to get this app.

Marcus Lillington:
I’m not spending $2.99 on it.

Paul Boag:
Oh you tight arse, you tight arse.

Marcus Lillington:
Because I won’t use it.

Paul Boag:
No, no, I’ll let you have a play with it on mine. But it’s so satisfying, the sounds on it are so satisfying. And I recognize that it annoys some people but you can turn the sounds off. They have in there the ability to disable it. But I think it’s an example of sound being used really well on the website and I think there should be more of it, and I think there should be more of it and I think Marcus should be able to make a living out of making clicky noises. Would you really want to do that, mind?

Marcus Lillington:
Definitely. Fantastic.

Paul Boag:
Really? All those little whooshes and clicks and thuds and…

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah, I mean how – yeah, I mean…

Paul Boag:
You need to become a foley artist for software applications. That’s what they call them innit, foley – is it foley artist? That do sound effects? I think it is.

Marcus Lillington:
I don’t know. No idea. Never heard that before. Day One…

Paul Boag:
Foley artist.

Marcus Lillington:
Why can’t we do a…

Paul Boag:
I’m asking my computer to look it up.

Marcus Lillington:
Okay.

Paul Boag:
Yeah. I’m right. Foley artists.

Marcus Lillington:
Okay.

Paul Boag:
Look to recreate the realistic ambient sounds that a film portrays.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah, yeah, I know, like the kind of rustly bags.

Paul Boag:
And the clippity clop with two rubbers…

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah. You were doing that earlier without knowing it.

Paul Boag:
Oh yeah I was.

Marcus Lillington:
It’s interactive audio design, I believe it’s called.

Paul Boag:
Yes.

Marcus Lillington:
And I’ve looked into it in the past and there are a few people who do it and do it very well. The people that work at Apple do it really well, that’s for damn sure.

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
It’s difficult but it’s very satisfying.

Paul Boag:
To get that line, isn’t it between – it’s reassure – because that’s what a noise should do, it should reassure that an action has happened without it being annoying.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah.

Paul Boag:
And that’s the key.

Marcus Lillington:
Unless you chose to make it annoying like my friends did when they got hold of my phone the other night.

Paul Boag:
What did they do?

Marcus Lillington:
I woke in the middle of the night to choo-choo noises every time an email came in and considering we have currently got a bit of a fault on our website – oh I shouldn’t say things like that, actually no it’ll be fixed by then.

Paul Boag:
Where? Emails coming every five seconds.

Marcus Lillington:
Emails coming in every five seconds and I have got like this train running by. I mean, it was like – odd noises happening and things. Juvenile, that’s what it is.

Paul Boag:
It’s juvenile, but fun.

Marcus Lillington:
Yes.

Paul Boag:
So there you go, that’s – so check out Day One. It’s worth paying the $2.99 to see how good design is done.

Marcus Lillington:
I will do it for that reason. But which one should I get, this one or that one?

Paul Boag:
Oh it’s the iPhone one that’s got the cool sound effects on.

Marcus Lillington:
Right, okay.

Paul Boag:
So get the iPhone one.

Marcus Lillington:
But I’m probably much more likely to use the Mac one.

Paul Boag:
Buy both.

Marcus Lillington:
I’m sounding like Chris.

Paul Boag:
Yeah you tight ass – yeah – I mean, whether you use it or not is irrelevant. Well it’s not irrelevant. I find it a great app but it’s that beautiful examples of design, and that’s what I love about iPhone design. It’s the devils in the detail. If we took the same attention on the web, well I think we are…

Marcus Lillington:
Sometimes do.

Paul Boag:
…are getting really good at doing that but I look at so many websites and they don’t have that level of attention to detail that some of the iPhone’s apps have. I mean some iPhone apps are terrible but this one really stood out for me. So there you go. That wraps it up for this week’s show. Four great apps for you to go and have play with. Hope you enjoy them. Keep the feedback coming. More apps please, we want more, more, more to include on the show. We have got all the way to Christmas with four apps per show. That’s a lot of apps people. So go along to boagworld.com/apps and add your suggestions to the ever growing list. It will be much appreciated. Also if you want a feedback on any of the apps that we talked about today or any of the issues we have raised then go along to boagworld.com/season/4 and select at the bottom of the page episode four.

Marcus Lillington:
Four, yes.

Paul Boag:
Marcus, jokieytime.

Marcus Lillington:
Best of – in the best of the jokes.

Paul Boag:
Talking of apps.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah here we go. Two 90 year old men

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
90 year old men, Mike and Joe.

Paul Boag:
So is 90 important?

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah. Have been friends all their lives. When it’s clear that Joe is dying, Mike visits him every day. One day Mike says, ‘Joe, we both loved football all our lives and we played Sunday football together for so many years. Please do me one favor. When you get to heaven, somehow you must let me know if there’s football up there.’ Joe looks up at Mike from his deathbed, ‘Mike you’ve been my friend for so many years, if it’s at all possible I will certainly do this favor for you.’ Shortly after that Joe passes on.

Paul Boag:
Oh.

Marcus Lillington:
Very sad.

Paul Boag:
Very sad. I’m feeling quite emotional.

Marcus Lillington:
Are you, really? At midnight a couple of nights later Mike is awakened from a sound sleep by a blinding flash of white light and a voice calling out to him, ‘Mike, Mike.’ ‘Who is it?’ Asks Mike sitting up suddenly. ‘Who is it?’ ‘Mike, it’s me Joe.’ ‘You’re not Joe, Joe just died.’ ‘I’m telling you, it’s me Joe’, insists the voice. ‘Joe, where are you?’ ‘In heaven’, replies Joe. ‘I have some really good news and a little bad news.’ ‘Tell me the good news first’, says Mike. ‘The good news’, Joe says, ‘is that there is a football team in heaven. Better still, all our old friends who died before us are here too. Better than that, we’re all young again. Even better still, it’s always spring time and it never rains or snows and best of all we can play football all we want and we never get tired.’ ‘That’s fantastic’, says Mike. ‘That’s beyond my wildest dreams. So what’s the bad news?’ ‘You’re playing center forward next Tuesday.’

Paul Boag:
I like that one. That one got me. I was thinking, where is this one going to go? Is it going to be some joke about Manchester United being shit or something like that but no, that was a good ending and I didn’t even need to appreciate football.

Marcus Lillington:
Exactly.

Paul Boag:
Good stuff.

Marcus Lillington:
It could have been anything couldn’t it, it could have been tennis.

Paul Boag:
So do you know what, if I’m being pedantic about it…

Marcus Lillington:
What?

Paul Boag:
Is that bad news then? The guy was going from being 90 with arthritis and all that kind of stuff to getting – being young again and playing football. Is that really bad news?

Marcus Lillington:
It’s a joke, Paul.

Paul Boag:
Am I thinking about it too much?

Marcus Lillington:
I think you are.

Paul Boag:
Alright. Well on that note we will leave it. We’ll talk to you again next week, can’t wait for our next set of apps.

These amazing show notes have been transcribed by our friends at Pods in Print. If you need transcription done, I cannot recommend them highly enough.

  • http://www.facebook.com/pascalw Pascal Wheeler

    Hey Paul, Marcus, many thanks for giving SocialSafe a little time in the limelight. Didn’t realise you could listen live but hopefully can clarify a couple of bits for you now.

    The data you back up from your social networks is stored locally on your machine and will always be accessible, even if you choose not to renew a licence (the licence gives you free updates and allows you to continue to perform back ups).

    Because SocialSafe is a desktop app and all data is downloaded directly to you (we see nothing), the app needs to be running to perform any type of back up. The current scheduler allows you to set times to run back ups but does require the app to be open. We’re looking at how to improve this – a little background app (menu/task bar) that takes care of scheduled back ups for example.
    We still struggle with the why! Is it simply a peace of mind back up tool in the same guise as an offsite photo back up tool? Or is it to look after your life’s story, to never forget, or is it simply most appropriate to businesses with social network presences that have a duty to document any public statements? With this in mind it’s been really helpful to see what you guys had to say.

  • Alex

    I really like the posts you guys make but please just summarise these podcasts when doing a post, reading through the banter really isn’t of any benefit and it unfortunately means I don’t have time to read your posts.

    • http://macsdownunder.com davidlegendmc

      I’d support having the full transcript is to ensure the content is accessible to all users. If you want a summary, skim read it :-)

  • http://twitter.com/amosuro Ashley Mosuro

    Totally agree with your points on Bootstrap – I personally I prefer to use these ‘frameworks’ as something to help me build upon my own version. I tend to go through these kind of boilerplates as a way to inspire new ways to improve my own boilerplate.

    Building a boilerplate of my own means that I usually know where to look when problems come up!

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