Screenflow, Starkers, Mailchimp and Photosync

On this week’s show we have screencast recording software, Wordpress starter templates, software for sending newsletters and an app for moving photos around seamlessly.

Play

This week on the show we cover:

Paul Boag:
This week on the Boagworld web design podcast we are going to look at ScreenFlow, Starkers – bizarrely – MailChimp – don’t snigger – and PhotoSync. So –

Marcus Lillington:
Woo-hoo

Paul Boag:
Woo-hoo – and that’s my new attempt to start the show differently.

Marcus Lillington:
You haven’t – I don’t think you’ve done the traditional start on any one of this series.

Paul Boag:
No, I’m determined, never again. And we talk about the fact that I haven’t done the traditional start every show. So that is becoming a tradition in itself. So we need to stop it.

Marcus Lillington:
Well I know, right, yeah we’ll stop doing it.

Paul Boag:
So there’s Marcus here and also joining us is Dan. Hello Dan.

Dan Sheerman:
Hello. I’ve just come along just to make a general nuisance of myself…

Paul Boag:
Yes.

Dan Sheerman:
…and poke my nose in as always.

Paul Boag:
Yes.

Marcus Lillington:
Is this your first time?

Paul Boag:
No.

Dan Sheerman:
This is my second time.

Marcus Lillington:
Right

Dan Sheerman:
I was here, shortly after I started at Headscape I joined you.

Marcus Lillington:
Okay.

Paul Boag:
The great thing about Dan is that he brings unique grumpy perspective.

Dan Sheerman:
I do.

Paul Boag:
For someone so young he is so bitter

Marcus Lillington:
Well and he knows what he is talking about. Which kind of makes a…

Paul Boag:
What are you implying?

Marcus Lillington:
That you don’t and I don’t.

Paul Boag:
Well put it like this. Dan this morning ‘fixed’ my Patchy installation which was working totally fine until he got his hands on it.

Dan Sheerman:
No comment

Paul Boag:
So here we are again.

Marcus Lillington:
Yes, Dan you’ve been away, haven’t you?

Dan Sheerman:
I have. I’ve just come back from WDC which was lovely. It was brilliant to catch up with some people and saw some absolutely fantastic talks.

Paul Boag:
So where’s WDC? Well I know where it is, it was a leading question.

Dan Sheerman:
Up in Bristol. It’s held at the Odeon up in Bristol.

Paul Boag:
Is it up? It’s across.

Marcus Lillington:
Bristol’s more down, really

Dan Sheerman:
Bristol’s up to me, anything north of the M4 is the north to me. So Bristol’s definitely up. I’m from way down south.

Marcus Lillington:
The whole of the U.K. is north to you pretty much isn’t it?

Dan Sheerman:
Pretty much.

Marcus Lillington:
Maybe south Devon and Cornwall, they would be down.

Dan Sheerman:
They would be south, yeah, yeah.

Paul Boag:
So Bristol – and it’s just a day’s conference isn’t it?

Dan Sheerman:
Yes, it’s a one-day conference. It’s absolutely brilliant. I think it was about £50, something like that.

Marcus Lillington:
I know it’s good value. It’s really good value.

Dan Sheerman:
It’s excellent value and it’s up and coming speakers as well. So it’s the sort of people that you don’t generally get to see.

Paul Boag:
The old boring…

Dan Sheerman:
You’ve spoken a couple of times, but normally it’s…

Paul Boag:
Yeah, only once.

Dan Sheerman:
…normally it’s pretty good.

Paul Boag:
Shut up. I sort of knew that was coming.

Marcus Lillington:
It was excellent this year. Paul wasn’t there.

Paul Boag:
So that’s because I was at Future of Web Apps.

Marcus Lillington:
Oh how did that go? I’ve been to FOWA before.

Paul Boag:
No, you haven’t. You’ve been to FOWD.

Marcus Lillington:
Are you sure?

Paul Boag:
I don’t think you’ve been to the apps one.

Marcus Lillington:
I’ve never actually sat in on any of the talks at these things, I just kind of mill around and interview people.

Paul Boag:
I’ve never been to FOWA.

Dan Sheerman:
I got the chance to go to one of each I think. I was on placement at Carsonified for a week and I managed to tag along and help out.

Paul Boag:
Right.

Dan Sheerman:
FOWD 2010, I think.

Paul Boag:
Right.

Dan Sheerman:
Sort of tagged along to FOWA 2010 as well. I think it was your – weren’t you doing a workshop?

Paul Boag:
Probably.

Dan Sheerman:
Possibly. I think I sat at the back and heckled you.

Paul Boag:
Oh did you? Cool. I wouldn’t have noticed you, you were one of the little people then.

Marcus Lillington:
FOWD. You’ve been to the FOWD many times.

Dan Sheerman:
Cheers.

Marcus Lillington:
So FOWA. Any good?

Paul Boag:
Well I realized certain things at FOWA. One is that –

Marcus Lillington:
You’re middle aged.

Paul Boag:
Developers are clever. And I’m not.

Marcus Lillington:
Oh but you sat in a few and thought ‘what the hell am I doing here?’

Paul Boag:
I tried to sit in and then realized I was really wasting my time, I didn’t understand any of it. It all sounded very clever to me. And very complicated. So – so I did that. I realized that. I also – the other thing I realized is that one – I get one consistent type of feedback every time I speak. Which is people come up to me said that was ‘an amazingly entertaining presentation’. They never come up to me and said ‘I learnt loads of things from that.’ ‘That was an inspiring presentation’ or ‘an intelligent presentation’ or anything else.
Marcus Lillington:
They’re never going to say the last one

Paul Boag:
The only word that I ever get is ‘entertaining’ – I know, I’m doomed. Basically I am just the comedy value. I am the comic of the web design community. And what is particularly sad about that is on the comic of the web design community. So it’s not a particularly high standard. It’s like I’m the accountant with the best personality. It’s not a particularly high standard to reach. So no –

Marcus Lillington:
What did you talk about Paul?

Paul Boag:
I talked about marketing.

Marcus Lillington:
See that’s why; no one’s interested.

Paul Boag:
Well I wasn’t, I was in the small room as well, which dented my pride, my over-expanded ego

Marcus Lillington:
Developers really not interested in marketing.

Paul Boag:
Actually it was quite – no, it was quite good actually. I…

Marcus Lillington:
I’m not saying it wasn’t good.

Paul Boag:
No, no I didn’t mean that. I mean the reaction I got from people.

Marcus Lillington:
Oh

Paul Boag:
It was day – I think a lot of developers are realizing that they’re having to market themselves personally, but also these are the guys that are out there producing all these apps either as side projects or whatever and they’re having to learn to market. I mean, I got chatting with Simon Wilson from Lanyrd.

Marcus Lillington:
Willison,

Paul Boag:
Willison. Not Wilson, Willison. Thank you.

Marcus Lillington:
That’s alright.

Paul Boag:
And, yeah, I mean he’s now a salesman basically, he’s selling Lanyrd and all the stuff that they are offering and all the rest of it. And he’s having to wrap his head around this. He comes from a development background. So, absolutely I think…

Marcus Lillington:
I’ve given out lots of advice early on about things like that.

Paul Boag:
Did you?

Marcus Lillington:
Yes.

Paul Boag:
There’s certainly…

Marcus Lillington:
They didn’t come back and say cheers or anything. So I assume they thought it was complete rubbish.

Paul Boag:
I think it’s taken them a while to realize, well no. I mean to begin with it was all about building the products. So I think only recently have they kind of got to the point of going, oh shit, we have to actually sell this thing.

Paul Boag:
And you know Simon, he was very honest and open and – so I got a lot of that. People that are going, yeah okay I do need to market and think about things like that and so on– and then they did an all day workshop on the subject as well. I hate all day workshops. Can I just say that? I have to work for a living that day. It’s horrendous.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah and all day, yeah it’s – I’ve done a couple with you. I just get bored.

Paul Boag:
Well that’s because you don’t really do them…

Dan Sheerman:
Working 9 to 5, the thought of it.

Paul Boag:
I know.

Dan Sheerman:
An entire day!

Paul Boag:
I know.

Dan Sheerman:
I can’t even imagine that.

Paul Boag:
It’s horrendous. So anyway that’s what I have been doing. And I’m going to San Francisco next week.

Marcus Lillington:
Jet setter.

Paul Boag:
What can I say. I’m going to go and hook up with Leo Laporte and pretend I’m a proper podcaster. And I’m trying to wangle a tour around Twitter.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah. That would be cool. Do you know anyone in Twitter over there?

Paul Boag:
No I’m just going to turn up. Give me a tour. Yeah I do.

Marcus Lillington:
Do you know who I am?

Paul Boag:
No, I know a couple of people. So I’m going to see if I can wangle a little look around because apparently they’ve got a new swanky office. I want to have a look and to know how the other half live.

Marcus Lillington:
Do Twitter make any money these days?

Paul Boag:
I don’t know. I know

Marcus Lillington:
They do.

Paul Boag:
I know they’ve become very nazi like in a lot of ways recently.

Dan Sheerman:
Twitter is just the service for people who don’t have $50.

Marcus Lillington:
Yes.

Paul Boag:
I know. I’m not paying, that just, that annoyed me that. Have we talked about this before in the show?

Marcus Lillington:
No.

Dan Sheerman:
Are you not on AppDotNet?

Paul Boag:
No.

Dan Sheerman:
I assumed you’d be on AppDotNet.

Paul Boag:
No. I’ve refused.

Dan Sheerman:
Because you like new things.

Paul Boag:
I do like new things. But it’s like every body I know is on Twitter and why would I want to be on AppDotNet and pay money for the privilege. Basically they’re charging $50 for you to secure your username on the presumption that one day they might turn into something.

Dan Sheerman:
Well it’s a lot deeper that that. It’s $50 for you sort of being a part of a service and having a say in a service as opposed to being the product.

Paul Boag:
I mean I can see more and more, it does make sense. Have we actually said what we are talking about.

Paul Boag:
AppDotNet

Dan Sheerman:
AppDotNet.

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
We have briefly covered this in the past and not probably. But carry on the chaps as I’m quite interested in this.

Paul Boag:
So essentially AppDotNet is a Twitter clone. Right? So it’s exactly the same as Twitter, pretty much. The difference being is that they charge you for it. So their logic is that means they wont do bad things.

Marcus Lillington:
How much do they charge?

Paul Boag:
50…Well it’s less than that now.

Dan Sheerman:
It was originally $50 I think it’s dropped to something like $35 now. Well I think it’s still – for a developer license for access to the API, I think it’s still a $100, it’s per year. So, just access to it.

Marcus Lillington:
Its $35 a year for Twitter.

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Dan Sheerman:
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
It’s madness

Dan Sheerman:
It’s not a lot.

Paul Boag:
It’s not. Or actually, no it’s monthly membership for $5 – $36 a year. Yeah you’re right. Or $100 a year for developer license. I know what you’re saying, it is madness. Their logic is essentially that…

Marcus Lillington:
They won’t do bad things.

Dan Sheerman:
The fact that with Facebook and Twitter you’re the product

Paul Boag:
They’re selling your data. They are using advertising, you’ve got to say, I mean Twitter have done some fairly interesting things recently. For example they’ve put caps on third party. These third-party apps made their surveys. Suddenly now they’re capping the usage of – how many usage you are allowed to have and you’ve – they’re changing the ground on you the whole time. I mean another example is that they had an API which was called Ediware, right? Which Boagworld has used quite a lot of functionality from that and that’s now being sun-setted and retired and they’ve got a new thing. Where essentially the only difference to the new thing is that they are controlling their brand more. And they’re – they’ll be able to pump advertising and stuff into it. So they’re really rejigging quite heavily to push their advertising. And the logic of dot – of AppDotNet is we won’t have to do that because we charge you for it.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah. No ads.

Paul Boag:
Yeah, essentially. I know. That’s the – kind of my reaction.

Dan Sheerman:
Yeah, take it or leave it.

Paul Boag:
Yeah it just feels – I can understand it and it makes sense but I just keep going – well basically all of my followers on Twitter, everything I have built up is on Twitter – I can’t be assed for another network really.

Marcus Lillington:
If it was quite a lot cheaper than that, then I think it wouldn’t – if it was like I don’t even notice it.

Dan Sheerman:
But $36 a year is not a lot. Its $3 a month. What’s that, it’s like £2 month.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah it adds up, it adds up. Yeah for something – I only use Twitter probably once every three days. I mean it’s…

Dan Sheerman:
Ah I see that. I guess it comes down to how much you use it.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah. But also it depends on who follows you and who else uses it. That’s really important too.

Dan Sheerman:
True

Paul Boag:
I think yeah. I mean it also depends on why you use a network like that. For example, for me – there is kind of two sides to my Twittering. This is a massive tangent, isn’t it?

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah.

Paul Boag:
It’s quite an interesting one, right. There is two sides…

Marcus Lillington:
It’s about an app.

Paul Boag:
Yeah, there are two sides to my Twittering. One is my kind of personal gumph, right. Me chatting with Dan or with you or whatever else. And I could see app.net being of use to that because it will be a smaller community of people that really want to be there and I can see it from a kind of social interaction point of view. But the other side of my Twittering is it’s a marketing tool, right. And I know the vast majority of my followers aren’t going to pay $36 a year to use a service like that, which I guess is part of the reason – part of the thing about app.net is they don’t want marketers.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah.

Paul Boag:
On it. So I guess in that regards its right, but it’s not right for me personally. Do you pay for it?

Dan Sheerman:
No I haven’t – I haven’t even reserved a to username or anything like that. I would pay for – I’d happily pay for Twitter and Facebook. I mean the way I use Twitter and Facebook I have sort of my personal people that I know in person and friends from school on Facebook and I would use Twitter for my…

Marcus Lillington:
Facebook is for mates.

Dan Sheerman:
…more tech side of things. Yeah but I mean I’d use Twitter for sort of mates the industry. If anyone – like most of the people on my Facebook I would probably bore the crap out of if they actually followed me on Twitter.

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Dan Sheerman:
So I keep it fairly sort of separate thing there. But I would quite happily pay for Facebook or Twitter.

Paul Boag:
I would pay – yeah, I mean I would…

Marcus Lillington:
I probably would pay for Facebook which is bizarre. So if you said that to me two months ago I would say I wouldn’t. But I have been using it a lot more and I have gone through – I used to have – I was like 200 friends on it and I just thought I’m going to chose only people who I go to the pub with effectively.

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
And it has suddenly becomes a fantastic thing.

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
Because I was bothered to sort it out, I keep up with the feed and its just silliness but it’s great. It’s not full of – full of people that I don’t really know, etc., etc. So it’s turned into a really good tool that I like.

Dan Sheerman:
I think I would be even more willing to pay for Facebook if they actually sort out the developer tools for Facebook, if integrating Facebook with sites was nicer because their API is one of the most horrible things to work with in the world.

Paul Boag:
It isn’t very nice, which I have to say the new Twitter one, although I have got problems with it is really simple to use.

Dan Sheerman:
As long as they don’t change it. I think that’s the main problem I have to face because it seems like every time I go back to it they changed it.

Paul Boag:
Yes.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah. We have had that problem with them changing their rules with clients.

Dan Sheerman:
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
About – we have made recommendations for using commenting and things like that.

Dan Sheerman:
And then they change it on a whim.

Marcus Lillington:
It doesn’t work, they’ve changed it…

Paul Boag:
They’ve suddenly changed it. See it’s things like that. I mean that’s what’s annoying me about Twitter with this kind of getting rid of anywhere. I probably ought to be careful saying all this because I want –

Marcus Lillington:
They won’t let you in.

Paul Boag:
They won’t let me in.

Marcus Lillington:
This all came from you saying you’re going to try get in…

Paul Boag:
By the time this comes out it’ll be too late. Yeah. So that’s all right.

Marcus Lillington:
You will have already got an evil grin.

Paul Boag:
Twitter, you’re a bunch of – no, I mean, Twitter has been brilliant. I am going to wear my – if I go on the tour I am going to wear my original – I’m wearing my Twitter-T-shirt T-shirt, which was the first T-shirts they gave out when I met them at south by southwest…

Marcus Lillington:
I remember that.

Paul Boag:
…before they were all famous. Had a little chat with Biz.

Dan Sheerman:
I haven’t got any Twitter T-shirts. I’ve only got an ‘I tweeted at Steven Fry and all I got was this luxurious T-shirt’ T-shirt.

Paul Boag:
You paid money for that, didn’t you?

Dan Sheerman:
I did pay money for that.

Paul Boag:
See, this is why he is willing to pay money for app.net.

Dan Sheerman:
Because I am willing to pay money for silly, witty T-shirts.

Paul Boag:
Yes, absolutely. Right, shall we move on to we we’re actually going to talk about on the show? Right, okay.

Screenflow

Paul Boag:
So our first up is a designer tool and it is a tool called ScreenFlow for the Mac. This is a Mac only tool. I have been quite careful not to do too many Mac only tools.

Marcus Lillington:
There are other equivalents, Camtasia.

Paul Boag:
Yes, Camtasia looks like it costs three times the price.

Marcus Lillington:
Does it?

Paul Boag:
I don’t know, it used to. Camtasia, I never spelled Camtasia either.

Marcus Lillington:
C-A-M-T-A-S-I-A.

Paul Boag:
Yes I can really. I was joking.

Marcus Lillington:
ScreenFlow is not cheap though.

Marcus Lillington:
Oh, okay.

Paul Boag:
You know what, ScreenFlow is like is $79.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah but it’s not £0.69p, is it?

Paul Boag:
Oh no, but you don’t expect that from a Mac app.

Marcus Lillington:
£1.99.

Paul Boag:
Although one you shouldn’t expect it from a thing-a-me-bob either is…

Marcus Lillington:
I hate the fact that no one has value in applications anymore. This is a whole other subject.

Dan Sheerman:
It’s not…

Paul Boag:
And here comes the grumpy old man.

Marcus Lillington:
We did actually cover this briefly with Lee the other week.

Dan Sheerman:
Yeah.

Paul Boag:
Yeah it’s true. Although I think that is going change. I think it’s going to go – we are in that place at the moment where everyone expects everything for nothing. Although it’s been like that for a decade.

Marcus Lillington:
I hope there is because the amount of effort that goes into a £0.59p app that just doesn’t get and people sit there going, ‘Oh but it’s £0.60p’.

Paul Boag:
Oh yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
Oh I can’t spend that, it’s just preposterous.

Paul Boag:
Well anyway, ScreenFlow is £63.88. Camtasia is £238.

Marcus Lillington:
Aimed more at the corporate market I suspect.

Paul Boag:
Yes, absolutely. Although I have to say from a user experience point of view, I prefer ScreenFlow. So what – we haven’t even said what they are yet. See this is what happens. You jump in and make presumptions –

Marcus Lillington:
They are screen-recording tools. There we go.

Paul Boag:
So there we go, screen-recording and so much more apparently.

Marcus Lillington:
Really?

Paul Boag:
Apparently, yes. I mean right, let’s talk about ScreenFlow because that’s the one that we are actually discussing. I mean it is a bit more on the screen-recording because you can record yourself.

Marcus Lillington:
This is true. It can show a little box in the corner.

Paul Boag:
Well it doesn’t have to be a little box, it could be a big box. I have got to do this tomorrow haven’t I?

Marcus Lillington:
Yes for you. Doing the best video you have ever made. No pressure.

Paul Boag:
No pressure at all. So essentially you can record your screen, you can pan it, you can zoom it, you can do effects to it. You can crop and resize, scale video, you can edit bits of different takes together, you can overlay an audio track, you can record your webcam or any other source that you may wish to mention and it is a really great way of quickly and easily creating what I think look like very professional kind of screen-recording stuff.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah, I think it’s great. Because it’s easy to use, that’s the main thing.

Paul Boag:
It’s deadly easy to use and it’s also got a lot of the kind of –

Marcus Lillington:
Five, four, three, two, one, that’s what it does. And then you start recording.

Paul Boag:
Oh I see. What the hell he was doing there!

Marcus Lillington:
Proving that I have actually used it.

Paul Boag:
Right.

Marcus Lillington:
Which is unlike most of us.

Paul Boag:
It is, this is true. So it’s got some really good transitions and stuff like it makes use of Mac’s core animation and core image stuff, which means it’s really smoothly done. It’s a great app – I don’t think there is a huge amount to say about it. Just that, the more and more as I look at websites these days they have the screen recordings on them, not just – you see we are not even just talking about, you know I want to show off an application and record a thing about it. It could equally be, I use them all the time for presentations. So I will record a presentation or a webinar or whatever you are supposed to call them these days. You could export straight obviously to desktop or to Youtube or Vimeo, so I export them to my desktop and then up to Vzaar, which is a video hosting service that I use. But yeah it’s great. It’s great for recording, great for editing, great for sharing. Deadly simple, don’t know what else to say about it.

Marcus Lillington:
Well I think that was a pretty pathetic design section really. Here is an app, go check it out.

Paul Boag:
I really didn’t know what to say about it.

Marcus Lillington:
And it’s not really a designer tool either. It’s an anyone-who-ever-wants-to-record-their-screen tool, isn’t it really?

Paul Boag:
Yeah I suppose the designer – so we have ripped off the designers this week.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah they must be feeling a bit hard done by.

Paul Boag:
Let’s – what other designer tools that we can talk about. We can talk about Coda. You want to talk about Coda, don’t you?

Dan Sheerman:
I don’t mind. I do love Coda. I love all of Panic’s software.

Paul Boag:
Oh, there’s a sweeping statement. Why do you love all of Panic’s software?

Marcus Lillington:
But we covered Coda two weeks ago chaps.

Paul Boag:
I know.

Dan Sheerman:
It’s nice, reasonably priced, I’m going to sound like I am working for Panic now.

Paul Boag:
I’m just interested to know – no I am not going to let him go off on one too long. I just want to know why he likes all of Panic’s stuff. So Panic produced Coda, Transmit – Unison? What the hell is that? ‘Best Usenet browser.’

Dan Sheerman:
I say I like all of their software, I like Coda and Transmit.

Paul Boag:
Diet Coda and Prompt.

Dan Sheerman:
Diet Coda you used for a little while on your iPad, didn’t you?

Paul Boag:
I’ve still got it on my iPad. It’s really quite –

Dan Sheerman:
Are you enjoying it?

Paul Boag:
I have to say – well no.

Dan Sheerman:
No.

Marcus Lillington:
‘Quite simply, no.’

Paul Boag:
It’s an interesting one – link in to the show notes to Diet Coda, and indeed to Panic as well.

Marcus Lillington:
And Transmit.

Paul Boag:
Panic will cover Transmit.

Marcus Lillington:
Are you sure?

Paul Boag:
Yeah. Look –

Marcus Lillington:
That’s the only one I use in fairness.

Paul Boag:
Diet – no it’s really interesting, Diet Coda. It is a brilliant implementation of an HTML and CS editor for the iPad. They could not do it better.

Marcus Lillington:
Yep.

Paul Boag:
And it is a coding environment I would use, but it has two drawbacks. Drawback one, why the hell would you want to code really on the iPad particularly anyway?

Dan Sheerman:
Yep.

Paul Boag:
That’s a debatable one because I know some people have kind of moved to using the iPad as their primary machine in a lot of cases. When I go off to conferences or whatever, having something like Diet Coda is great. The other problem I’ve got with it and this is the fundamental one, no local copy, right. You’re only editing a live site.

Dan Sheerman:
So it doesn’t use local storage on the iPad at all?

Paul Boag:
Nope. No.

Dan Sheerman:
Interesting.

Paul Boag:
So on that basis that really limits it. It kind of reduces it down to a ‘oh shit, something’s gone wrong with the website, I’m out and about, I need to fix it quickly.’

Dan Sheerman:
And for that it’s excellent.

Paul Boag:
And for that it’s excellent.

Dan Sheerman:
But for that I can do on my Jailbreak on iPhone, have a command line.

Paul Boag:
Yes, you could, but that’s you.

Dan Sheerman:
That’s me.

Marcus Lillington:
We have that, on – recorded now.

Dan Sheerman:
Jailbreak? Yep. It’s not illegal.

Marcus Lillington:
Are you sure?

Paul Boag:
Is it not?

Dan Sheerman:
Still running something ridiculous like IOS 5.0.1, but there’s just a couple of things, there’s couple of little tweaks that I still quite like on it.

Paul Boag:
What are your couple of little tweaks? Now this is a tangent on a tangent.

Dan Sheerman:
This is on a tangent on a tangent. See this is why you should never invite me on to the podcast. I keep going off of one. Scrobbling because I am a mad Last.fm fan. And command line and file access and just general little, tiny little tweaks.

Paul Boag:
That doesn’t sound like a good reason…

Dan Sheerman:
It’s fine. Jailbreak is – we know, what’s good and anyone else will be like you.

Paul Boag:
Yeah but you can’t explain it.

Dan Sheerman:
I can. Alright, okay – alright. If I am looking for my car keys in a dark room I can double tap my lock button and have the flashlight come on rather than having to unlock it. I can – I’ve got lock screen, so I can read my email on the lock screen and I can instantly delete it. You’ll hate that because we have different opinions on email. You’ll only check it once every week…

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
…And I’ll just go ‘oh there’s an email, I don’t need to read that’ delete, gone and it’s done, it’s dealt with.

Paul Boag:
Okay.

Dan Sheerman:
Or I can flag it and follow it up on my lock screen.

Marcus Lillington:
I like Panic because they have got a good tag line. There you go.

Dan Sheerman:
What’s that, “shocking”..?

Paul Boag:
“Hi, we’re Panic…”

Marcus Lillington:
“Shockingly good software.”

Paul Boag:
Well it doesn’t say that on mine. “We make super nice apps.” Oh do you get a different one every time you hit refresh?

Dan Sheerman:
You’re going to sit there refreshing the page now, aren’t you?

Paul Boag:
This is like that. No, it doesn’t say that. He just makes it up.

Marcus Lillington:
Look at the top of your browser window, Panic.

Paul Boag:
Oh “shockingly good software.”

Paul Boag:
Now we’re doing – we’re back to the original tangent now.

Marcus Lillington:
What are we actually supposed to be reviewing in the section of…

Paul Boag:
Oh yeah this is the developer section, isn’t it? Shit, we’ve moved on.

Dan Sheerman:
It’s Tangent section.

Starkers

Screenshot of the Starkers website

Paul Boag:
No, this is – I don’t know whether this is a developer – the line between developer and designer I don’t get it anymore. So I am recoding Boagworld from the ground up, right. I have had this problem where although I have done – we did a season a couple of seasons ago didn’t we about where I rebuilt Boagworld but what I did when I did that rebuild is I just changed the theme on WordPress, right and I basically edited the theme to make it look new. But this website now has been running since 2005, admittedly not the whole time on WordPress but a vast majority of that. And it has been layers of shit on layers of shit, you know and every now and again you need to wind things down and you need to start from scratch. So that’s what I am doing this time around, completely reinstall the WordPress, bring everything in, etc., etc. Part of that is I have got to recode the template and I want to have – I want to know about every line that’s in there. I want to understand everything this time. So no more kind of, you know, oh here is the theme, I am just going to tweak and edit and change. I really want to go back and understand stuff. That said, I don’t want to kind of open up a blank document and have nothing to refer to, a no starting point. So I need something to refer to. So I was looking around for a bare bones theme for WordPress. Have you ever done this? How do you start when you do a WordPress build?

Dan Sheerman:
I start completely from the ground up.

Paul Boag:
Really? Nothing at all?

Dan Sheerman:
Nothing at all.

Paul Boag:
Wow.

Dan Sheerman:
But then I do that with everything. I don’t – I hate frameworks.

Paul Boag:
Yes.

Dan Sheerman:
I am an anti-framework…

Paul Boag:
I know, we have had this conversation many, many times before.

Dan Sheerman:
We have done. Yeah.

Paul Boag:
So that’s quite interesting. You even do that with WordPress. You really do know every single line that goes into your code.

Dan Sheerman:
Yeah.

Paul Boag:
That’s cool, no that’s good. I am totally there. So I was trying to – I am kind of almost there but my knowledge of WordPress isn’t good enough I don’t think to be able to do that.

Marcus Lillington:
The fantastic thing about WordPress though is any CMS can be great if the documentation is great.

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
And WordPress documentation is absolutely the best thing. It really is, it’s just stellar.

Paul Boag:
Yeah it really, you know, they – I do know that and I could do it that way. But even though sometimes knowing what to search on…

Marcus Lillington:
Yes.

Paul Boag:
Do you know what I mean?

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah there is that.

Paul Boag:
You know, I think if you kind of know what to search in the documentation it’s fine. But if you are like – uh, you know, so I need something to start with but I wanted it to be as minimalistic as possible and I probably won’t even use that. I won’t overtype but I just want it there as a reference of, ooh that’s how you do a loop or that’s how you do this or whatever.

Marcus Lillington:
Definitely.

Paul Boag:
So – but I needed something so, so clean. So I went through all these different options and there is one out there called Bones and which a lot of people like. But even that, it had like CSS and it had other stuff in and PHP, it had things in its function.php and I just didn’t understand it all. So I was searching and searching and searching and eventually came across something called Starkers, right.

Marcus Lillington:
Okay.

Paul Boag:
It’s a great name, what a brilliant name. And I was looking through it and it really looked like what I wanted. It’s on GitHub. So you can go in and actually look at the files without downloading them. And I really did understand everything that was written there. It all kind of made sense to me and I thought this is a great starting point. I then noticed it was by Elliot Jay Stocks and Keir Whitaker, which is really weird. I didn’t know that they produced it or I didn’t know anything about it. I just kind of stumbled across it and Elliot and Keir are great guys that I have got a huge respect for. You must know them as well I am guessing.

Marcus Lillington:
I bumped into Keir at WDC and we…

Paul Boag:
Oh really?

Marcus Lillington:
Said we would catch up but I couldn’t find him earlier. I couldn’t find him, like he ran away.

Paul Boag:
That’s often the way of course. So this is something that these guys have done and it is a really great job and what they – originally when they produced this it was a real stripped-down version of the default theme that came with WordPress. But now they’ve completely re-coded it from scratch. So it’s all HTML5 and it’s just really well done. I mean, whether I use their actual code I very, very much doubt but it’s so clean that you can easily look through it and go oh okay, so that’s how you do a loop or this is how you add an extract or whatever else. So absolutely highly recommend it. Check it out. If you’re kind of new to WordPress I think this is a really, really good starting point to get going because it’s just so incredibly clean. It’s just brilliant. Can’t say enough nice things about it.

Okay so we are now talking about something for website owners.

Marcus Lillington:
Oh?

Paul Boag:
What do you mean oh?

Marcus Lillington:
I can pay attention now.

Paul Boag:
Why? You think this might be for you?

Marcus Lillington:
No but I might understand it.

Paul Boag:
You might understand it?

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah.

Paul Boag:
You understand Starkers. Well, I explained it very simple for you.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah, I will never use it, that’s all.

Paul Boag:
No, no you won’t use it. So what we want to talk about for website owners today is something we already use, the way you probably don’t, it’s called MailChimp.

Mailchimp

Mailchimp Homepage

Marcus Lillington:
I don’t but I know what it is.

Paul Boag:
Most people know what MailChimp is but have you actually used it and have you discovered quite how cool it is? MailChimp for those of you that don’t know is for sending out emails as you might gather by the name and it’s brilliant for emails and newsletters and stuff like that. We use it at the moment – I actually think we use it in a really shit way at the moment and I’m going to sort that out over the next year. So one of the things on my agenda for next year is to re-launch…

Marcus Lillington:
World domination.

Paul Boag:
World domination, after I have done that…

Marcus Lillington:
Sex change.

Paul Boag:
Yeah, and various other things in my perverted bucket list. Not that I don’t like world domination or sex changes are perverted; that’s a separate list I have.

Marcus Lillington:
Okay.

Paul Boag:
Oh God, can I lie down yet? So yes, MailChimp. So the way we are using MailChimp at the moment is I wanted to make newsletters easy by sending out newsletters. So just basically I use it for RSS. So basically it sucks in an RSS feed and sends out newsletters. But I would say that’s a bit shit. So I am going to start writing email newsletters every week.

Marcus Lillington:
That is better because currently we have the full transcript of every podcast going out.

Paul Boag:
I know, I’ve noticed that.

Marcus Lillington:
Which is far too big.

Paul Boag:
It is far too big.

Marcus Lillington:
Huge.

Paul Boag:
Yeah. So I mean, I could – there are other ways round that but I think writing something personal would be so much better. I think it’s a much better way of connecting with people.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah.

Paul Boag:
But this still can be used to – because it doesn’t just do RSS, that’s one of the kind of side features it does. It manages your mailing list and allows you to send emails out and it helps you, it’s got loads of resources. Again, going back to what we were saying earlier about templates, they’ve got loads of email templates that you can just tweak and improve for you because creating nice email HTML templates is the devil’s work. Have you had to do that?

Marcus Lillington:
I don’t know what you’re on about, everyone loves HTML email templates.

Paul Boag:
Aww. Have you had to do that?

Marcus Lillington:
I don’t know one developer that doesn’t absolutely love that job.

Paul Boag:
Have you have had to do that with us? Have we made you do that? I don’t think we have.

Marcus Lillington:
I’ve had to tweak a couple. I don’t think I’ve had to create any yet – I had to do a couple of Magento ones but they – I think I actually nicked a couple of templates off of MailChimp.

Paul Boag:
Right, because they’ve got loose, yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
And started from there. Because they have got some lovely templates, yeah.

Paul Boag:
It’s just a horrible, horrible job.

Dan Sheerman:
It’s basically table based design, isn’t it?

Paul Boag:
Yeah, well yeah kind of, with some CSS works.

Marcus Lillington:
Hacked to the extreme.

Paul Boag:
It’s just horrible, horrible experience. So yeah, they’ve got a load of templates you can use, you can put in your own logos, do your own stuff. It manages your email lists but you can also do things like I do on Boagworld at the moment and I will continue to do on the new site, which is they give you a form that you can add into your site so people can automatically sign up. They deal with all of the subscribing and unsubscribing stuff. They really work very hard in order to maintain their good rating with spam filters and stuff like that. So they can be what feels like a little bit overly harsh in terms in terms of that if too many people unsubscribe then they start threatening you and saying they are going to send the boys round and stuff like that, which can be problematic if like me when I started using it I had a big mailing list of people that had signed but it had been a while since they’d sent them an email. So I moved across to MailChimp and I got this massive unsubscribe at the beginning because people didn’t – no longer wanted my emails. And so I got MailChimp going, ooh you’re naughty. But that settled down fairly quickly. And they were – excellent customer service as well because they actually – they wrote to me, it wasn’t just an automated email that said you have broken so and so a guideline. You could actually interact with them and they would give you advice and support and that kind of stuff. So it’s really good. The other thing that I really like about MailChimp is I think it’s a really good example of the importance of design.

Marcus Lillington:
That’s what I am looking at.

Paul Boag:
Yeah, it’s a beautifully designed website. But I think what’s kind of most impressive about it is I actually used them as an example in the talk that I gave at Future of Web Apps because if – I said to the audience, right if you could name me one mail provider that does this kind of stuff.

Marcus Lillington:
And they all said Tiler [ph].

Paul Boag:
Yeah, it was a bit of a gamble. But fortunately they all did say MailChimp. And there are some other really good services out there. There’s one – whose name I have forgotten now, that’s – that’s very – Campaign Monitor…

Marcus Lillington:
Yes.

Paul Boag:
…is another really well known one. But you always sort of remember MailChimp because it’s got personality, it’s got character, it’s got this great stuff – so you’ve got this logo done by – oh God, not logo – character, a Mail chimp, designed by John Hicks, that’s beautiful. But you also – in their user interface you’ve got some really cool stuff as well like when you have the preview window. Have you ever used this?

Dan Sheerman:
I’m not sure I have.

Paul Boag:
Oh it’s great, you’d absolutely love it. So you have this preview window where it shows you your email and of course one of the big problems with email clients is the width, isn’t it, you’ve got your–

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah.

Paul Boag:
So it’s got this window and you can drag it out to different widths and see it and along the top of it, it’s got a ruler that shows you how many pixels, you know, it’s been dragged out and then above it it’s got the MailChimp icon or character with his arm pointing down the ruler. And as you pull out his arm gets longer and longer and longer.

Marcus Lillington:
Ah yes.

Paul Boag:
And then eventually pops off.

Marcus Lillington:
Yes.

Paul Boag:
And blood spurts everywhere.

Marcus Lillington:
Yes, no I have seen that.

Paul Boag:
And they also have this great thing in the top bar of it where it says – it sends you little – the mail, the chimp gives you little messages. So he says things like I really need to improve my sense of balance and there’s a link and you click on it, and it goes to a really funny YouTube video. It’s got lots of them randomly but one that really got me of this chimp sitting on a branch and he’s picking his arse with his finger, right. Really attractive kind of chimp thing. And he takes his finger out, looks at it, smells it and then falls off the branch. It’s the funniest thing ever. So they’ve got loads of little things like that which add real character into it, really good design and it makes you want to use their product rather than the competition’s. It’s just brilliant, absolutely brilliant. So check out MailChimp if you want to send out emails which you should be doing. A lot of us web designers tend to pooh-pooh email as a kind of oh, we don’t want more spam and all the rest of it but actually email is a really good and powerful part of your digital strategy and you should be using email. MailChimp is one to check out. The other thing that I love about MailChimp is that you can do conditioned based emailing. So for example on the anniversary of someone being signed up or on their birthday or whatever other criteria that you meet, you can pick, it will automatically send them an email. So actually…

Marcus Lillington:
So you can categorize people in your list.

Paul Boag:
Oh absolutely.

Marcus Lillington:
And send it all to the nice people.

Paul Boag:
Yes, or the nasty people or – be great for Santa, those that are good boys and those that are bad boys, you know, that kind of thing. And it’ll also do – it’s really good for – have you ever signed up for one of these kind of email courses where you get one email a week kind of thing.

Marcus Lillington:
I haven’t.

Paul Boag:
Well occasionally they do that kind of thing. It’s really good at managing that. So you can say, send a user the second one or the third one a week later etc. So it can do some really very sophisticated stuff but it’s cheap, it’s free to sign up and free to send emails under a certain number.

Marcus Lillington:
2000 subscribers.

Paul Boag:
2000. Yeah. So we’ve have just tipped over above that in our email subscription. So we have to pay now but for a long time we used it free and once you get up to 2000 subscribers you don’t really mind paying a bit, and it’s really not very much. I am actually surprised. How much is the pricing, you have got it in front of you?

Marcus Lillington:
No, I only noticed that bit.

Paul Boag:
So it’s free forever up to 2000 subscribers or 12,000 emails. Your monthly plans start at $10 a month and goes up to $240 per month if you want like 25,000 plus subscribers or whatever.

Marcus Lillington:
Crickey, look at that.

Paul Boag:
So we don’t pay that kind of number. So yeah, but they’ve, oh actually sorry, I tell a lie. It has got high volume as well. You could be paying $12,000 per month if you have 3 million subscribers.

Marcus Lillington:
Wow.

Paul Boag:
But they have also got pay as you go scheme as well, so you can pay per email as well but I am imagining that gets very expensive if you have got 3 million subscribers. So lots of different options, ways to go, check it out. Oh, it’s got transactional, what’s transactional? Transactional emails, one to one trigger emails from apps. I don’t understand that. But the other really good thing about Mail Chimp is they have got tons of really useful resources as well. So you have got loads of white paper guides on like Mail Chimp – doing mobile based email or an email marketing field guide or how to manage your lists and they have just got tons and tons of really good material. Mail Chimp for bloggers. All kinds of really good resources as well to check out and that’s not even counting their kind of HTML library templates they have got. They have done a load of research, they have got research material on here as well, videos, they have got expert advice, tons of great stuff. If you have got to do anything with email you really ought to check out mailchimp.com.

So we come finally to our random mobile app section of the show.

Marcus Lillington:
What is it this week, Paul?

Paul Boag:
Well I was wondering what Dan’s favorite mobile at the moment is. What do you use a lot? Apple Maps.

Dan Sheerman:
Well I haven’t actually installed any new apps in quite a while. Not Apple Maps. I am still on IOS5. So I have still get Google Maps for at least a little while.

Marcus Lillington:
Apple Maps are okay based on my experience.

Dan Sheerman:
Well I use co-pilot in the car, which is excellent.

Paul Boag:
I am sorry, Apple Maps is shit.

Marcus Lillington:
Well I have only used it three to four times and it’s been fine.

Paul Boag:
Well it depends what you’re using it for.

Dan Sheerman:
Well there was a rush to get it out though. It’s – for what it is.

Marcus Lillington:
I haven’t used it with the direction, I’ve used it –

For the fact that you are trying to map an entire globe I think we have quite high expectations, I think for what it is it’s going to get there and when it does, it’s going to be fantastic. It’s a good start.

Paul Boag:
I recognized we have – our high expectations have come from the fact of what Apple gave us previously.

Dan Sheerman:
Yes.

Paul Boag:
If they hadn’t given something and then taken it away, there wouldn’t have been a problem. Or even if they had said okay we are not going to install the map app. Oh we are going to install the Apple Map by default but the Google one is still going to be on the app store and you can delete the Apple one if you don’t want it.

Dan Sheerman:
Yes.

Paul Boag:
I wish you could delete things like stock apps and stuff like that but that’s a whole another rant.

Dan Sheerman:
Jailbreak.

Paul Boag:
Yeah well okay – there, see there is the first good reason you have given me to jailbreak.

Marcus Lillington:
No, just put them all on some screen miles away.

Paul Boag:
No, it’s not tidy. Doesn’t – that upsets my OCD.

Marcus Lillington:
Well you’re more autistic than me.

Paul Boag:
Yeah I am considerably more autistic. So that annoys me. No, where it fails in me, I can forgive – well no, I know in some cases in missing whole streets and it’s putting cities in the wrong place and shit like that.

Marcus Lillington:
So I have been on a couple of kind of away days, long weekends, that kind of thing and I have been – I was in Lyme Regis, I was like where is that restaurant I want to go to and it was like sort of oh, it is up around the corner from where I was in the car park. It’s a little tiny village really, little town in the south coast of England. Absolutely bang on, you are standing here, this is where you need to go.

Paul Boag:
See it’s the points of interest, that are what pisses me off. I can forgive everything else but in Blandford for example, you search on Google for Indian restaurants. It will find all three or four Indian restaurants. You search on Apple Maps and you get one.

Dan Sheerman:
I think – I’m not sure, I think that’s down to the categorization. If you actually search for, if you know like the name of the actual places it will pick them up.

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Dan Sheerman:
I don’t think they are categorized into groupings of Indian restaurants, pizza places, and that is –

Paul Boag:
And that’s the problem. Because that’s how you search.

Dan Sheerman:
Yeah, true.

Paul Boag:
So, I – pah.

Marcus Lillington:
Mine’s not been – mine’s been to find my way around places and it’s been fine, but yeah.

Paul Boag:
I mean their other things are great about it. I love the fact it’s vector based, which means it is much faster than Google maps, and it downloads less data. So I mean that’s great. I’m not just knocking it because everybody else is knocking it. I am knocking it really for points of interest for me and also what’s – Flyover? I mean absolutely pointless, pointless feature.

Dan Sheerman:
I love that.

Marcus Lillington:
I haven’t seen that, Flyover. What is it, show me?

Paul Boag:
Go to London.

Dan Sheerman:
Have you got a 4 or 4S? I think is it only available on the 5? Because I was playing with it on Tom’s 5.

Paul Boag:
It really –

Dan Sheerman:
You can just pan and tilt and just go – I was just running around Southampton.

Paul Boag:
But compared to Street View. Street View’s really useful, if I am going to a conference or take for example – he says, name dropping – when I‘m going to go to see Leo Laporte, the first thing he did is send me a Street View. So I knew what his place looked like.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah, okay.

Paul Boag:
But it will only work, you know, like 3D is a different thing to Flyover because 3D just tilts the map at an angle.

Dan Sheerman:
Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.

Paul Boag:
Flyover is where you get the buildings actually –

Dan Sheerman:
Oh you actually get the relief in the maps.

Paul Boag:
Yeah, the relief in the maps. But that doesn’t help you to navigate in any way, shape or form.

Dan Sheerman:
No, but it does look pretty.

Paul Boag:
Yeah it’s just eye candy.

Dan Sheerman:
Street View is useful. Street View is genuinely useful if you’re going to somewhere that you have never been before.

Paul Boag:
Yeah it is, it’s massively useful. So anyway you didn’t answer the question. You haven’t installed any apps for ages?

Dan Sheerman:
I haven’t installed any new apps for ages.

Paul Boag:
So what do you use most?

Dan Sheerman:
Stuff that I’ve used since I had my first gen iPhone I think, things like Shazam, Twitter, Facebook.

Paul Boag:
Shazam? See there’s an app that I use once in a blue moon.

Dan Sheerman:
Oh no, Shazam I use all the time because I love my music and I watch a shocking amount of television and all the music that I listen to comes from TV…

Paul Boag:
Right.

Dan Sheerman:
…so I can sort of find immediately tracks from that and just when I’m out and about. I think it’s –just discovery of music because I use lot of on demand services, I listen to a lot of radio. So in my discovery of music, that really helps with that.

Paul Boag:
Okay.

Dan Sheerman:
I’m trying to think, I have got Netflix app, because I love Netflix, Shazam I’ve had for ages, Remote for Apple TV.

Paul Boag:
You really don’t have that many apps do you?

Dan Sheerman:
I don’t, no.

Paul Boag:
That is amazingly empty. Because you’ve only got, what is it, two screen’s worth?

Dan Sheerman:
I’ve got two screens but they are all in folders.

Paul Boag:
Yeah but even so I have like two screens then plus like two screens of folders all full up.

Marcus Lillington:
How many of them do you actually access?

Paul Boag:
Oh only about four.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah

Dan Sheerman:
Yeah

Marcus Lillington:
Because I’ve got lots of folders as well and stuff that’s been in there.

Paul Boag:
So what do you use all the time? What are your common apps?

Marcus Lillington:
What apart from obviously stuff like mail?

Paul Boag:
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington:
BBC News…

Paul Boag:
Youtube or…

Marcus Lillington:
Oh camera, the new thing just talking about the cool apps, the Panorama.

Paul Boag:
Panorama.

Marcus Lillington:
Really is fantastic.

Paul Boag:
You love that, yeah.

Dan Sheerman:
Can’t do that

Marcus Lillington:
That is so, so cool.

Paul Boag:
Can’t you do it because your phone is too old?

Dan Sheerman:
Yeah

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah, stunningly good. Well done Apple.

Dan Sheerman:
I like using Path because I’ve always hated Instagram. I’ve always had an allergy

Paul Boag:
Yeah, what is your problem with Instagram?

Dan Sheerman:
I don’t know, I don’t know. I just – yeah someone mentioned – and I went ‘ah no, I hate that.’ Because it’s new and it’s horrible and no, so I use Path which I use for my filters, which no one else uses. I used to have about – I don’t know, 25, 30 odd people and they’ve gradually all dropped off using it. So I think I’m just shouting into the ether.

Paul Boag:
I think – it does repost to Twitter I notice.

Dan Sheerman:
What I used it for mainly was reposting to Twitter and Facebook at the same time.

Paul Boag:
Right.

Dan Sheerman:
So I could fire up Path and just say post to Twitter, Facebook and check me on Four Square if I’m somewhere and I can post a photo, it’ll check me in. But Facebook have recently changed it so you can’t add what Path call Thoughts, would be like a Tweet or a status update. Facebook have changed something weird so when you post a thought it just links off to the Path website, it doesn’t actually post it as a status anymore…

Paul Boag:
Right, that’s the other thing that I don’t like about it with Twitter, which Instagram does. Well it’s not – it’s down to Twitter is that Twitter will show an Instagram picture in line while with Path you have to link off.

Dan Sheerman:
I think I have – I’m sure I have seen Path do it a couple of times but it’s not reliable, possibly. I don’t know. Yeah I do like that about it, yeah, it showing inline.

Marcus Lillington:
I use Voice Memos a lot.

Paul Boag:
Do you?

Marcus Lillington:
Yes, not for voice. God knows what this is going to include.

Paul Boag:
This is just him trying to…

[music plays]

Oh right, you record…

Marcus Lillington:
I put my guitar-y ideas down…

Paul Boag:
Oh right, that’s quite interesting. I always find it fascinating how different people use iPhones.

Marcus Lillington:
Tons and tons of 30 second clips. I go ‘oh I quite like that.’ And then I’ll just use it. It’s brilliant, absolutely brilliant.

Paul Boag:
Right. Yeah I find that absolutely – I mean, this is a massive tangent again but it is quite interesting to see how different people use their iPhones. It’s fascinating. Anyway, shall we –

Marcus Lillington:
I really like Words With Friends as well but nobody will play me.

Paul Boag:
Oh.

Dan Sheerman:
That’s because it’s ancient.

Paul Boag:
It’s designed for…

Marcus Lillington:
What’s wrong with that? Old doesn’t mean bad

Paul Boag:
But Words With Friends…

Dan Sheerman:
Multiplayer game apps come and go though.

Marcus Lillington:
Its scrabble.

Dan Sheerman:
True. I’ll play you at Words With Friends, Marcus.

Paul Boag:
Whenever I think of Words With Friends, you playing that, for some reason I have this image of you sitting at home with a blanket over your knees with your reading glasses on, with a cup of cocoa, playing that.

Dan Sheerman:
Playing scrabble.

Paul Boag:
It’s an old person’s game, is my point.

Marcus Lillington:
Scrabble is one of the best games ever invented.

Paul Boag:
It’s not, I don’t like it because it requires spelling.

Marcus Lillington:
Because you can’t spell.

Paul Boag:
That’s why I don’t like it.

Marcus Lillington:
I am a total grammar nerd, so I love it.

Dan Sheerman:
Go grammar!

Paul Boag:
Although apparently you were being criticized by one user for saying, oh no, now I’ve gone paranoid – ‘asterix’ instead of asterisk or something.

Marcus Lillington:
I don’t know how – I would pronounce asterisk ‘asterix’ but that may be wrong.

Dan Sheerman:
Asterisk, technically.

Paul Boag:
Because you were referring to some cartoon character from France.

Dan Sheerman:
It’s not an x.

Paul Boag:
There’s no x I it. You say with an x.

Marcus Lillington:
Asterisk, yes that’s a little star. Asterix is…

Paul Boag:
Well apparently in this show…

Marcus Lillington:
…is a French character.

Paul Boag:
Apparently in this show we were talking about little stars. I don’t even remember doing this but – and you were saying French cartoon characters.

Marcus Lillington:
That’s just my poor pronunciation. I wouldn’t spell it wrong.

Dan Sheerman:
That’s like espresso ‘expresso’

Paul Boag:
Oh I have that problem.

Marcus Lillington:
There’s been an x in espresso.

Dan Sheerman:
No, there has not.

Marcus Lillington:
So there. Na-na-na-na-naaa-na.

Paul Boag:
I say an x in it all the time. But then I speak Dorset, so, that’s a different language entirely.

Photosync

Photosync homepage

Paul Boag:
Right, anyway the app that we are supposed to be talking about this week is one called Photosync. Have either of you come across Photosync?

Marcus Lillington:
Nope

Dan Sheerman:
Nope.

Paul Boag:
So this is over – how then do you get photographs off of your iPhone onto your desktop?

Dan Sheerman:
iPhoto, email or Dropbox.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah, iPhoto.

Paul Boag:
Dropbox is a good one.

Dan Sheerman:
Dropbox automatically photo syncs and it gave me lots of free space.

Paul Boag:
Yes, I hadn’t thought of that one. This week’s…

Dan Sheerman:
I’ve made your app redundant.

Paul Boag:
To be honest I have been using it for a long time. No, it is better I think.

Marcus Lillington:
What’s wrong with iPhoto?

Paul Boag:
iPhoto, it’s a huge faf. You have to open up iPhoto…

Dan Sheerman:
Oh God, you need a cable. Oh you have got to plug it in physically.

Paul Boag:
Well just – yeah you have to physically plug it in. You have to launch iPhoto.

Marcus Lillington:
When you have huge 10 megabyte a piece photographs, a cable is a good idea isn’t it?

Paul Boag:
No, no, no. my problem with iPhoto, I use iPhoto all the time, right. I have all my family photographs off. But iPhoto is a dog, it optimizes really, really badly and actually you don’t need the cable for iPhoto because it uses some photo streaming thing.

Marcus Lillington:
It does do mail sync stream now.

Paul Boag:
Doesn’t it? The photo Stream thing.

Dan Sheerman:
It does, yes.

Paul Boag:
But a little app that I love is called Photosync right and I have lost it.

Marcus Lillington:
I might actually even use this one.

Paul Boag:
It is quite a useful little app. Photosync-app.com right and essentially it’s a tiny little app. You have one version running on your computer, just this little thingy in the menu bar and then you launch up this app, you select the files you want to send across and Bob’s your uncle you can send it straight across. If you don’t want to be running the little icon in the corner of your Mac.

Marcus Lillington:
It costs 1.99.

Paul Boag:
Oh for…

Dan Sheerman:
Two pounds Paul. Two pounds.

Marcus Lillington:
Actually no, that’s dollars, $1.99.

Paul Boag:
Yeah, see that’s a bargain. If on the other hand you don’t want to run the local app or if you are using someone else’s computer it even gives you a web URL you can type in, your local IP address of that iPhone and then you could just download stuff through a beautiful web interface, job done. Does video, does photographs. It’s a brilliant and quick way to get stuff across onto your computer.

Dan Sheerman:
All right.

Paul Boag:
I rest my case. Are you going to get it?

Dan Sheerman:
No.

Marcus Lillington:
That sounds pretty good actually.

Dan Sheerman:
I am stuck in my ways.

Paul Boag:
I have convinced Marcus. Sorry you don’t buy apps. I forgot that.

Dan Sheerman:
I do buy apps.

Paul Boag:
Right.

Dan Sheerman:
I just don’t buy new things that often.

Paul Boag:
Right. And I find this a really useful little app. There are loads of other ways of doing it. Another one that’s a really good link in the show notes is Pastebot, have you ever used Pastebot?

Dan Sheerman:
I have heard of it.

Paul Boag:
Pastebot is really good. So what Pastebot, now that one you do need a local computer desktop app running in your menu bar or whatever. But Pastebot, I think it’s from the same people – yeah it’s from Tapbot people. And essentially what that is it’s like a syncing clipboard, so you can go to a – copy something on your Mac and it then goes across on to your iPhone and vice versa. So that’s really good. For some reason their website is offline at the moment, which is a bit rubbish. CloudFlare is rubbish, as a service. Sorry, this is what they are using at the moment, right. I am saying that their site is offline. CloudFlare is something that I use on Boagworld and I am going to stop using it when I update it. And it supposedly increases performance because it – what, there is a word for it, when it spreads your assets all around the world so you are downloading it from – what’s it called?

Dan Sheerman:
Content delivery network.

Paul Boag:
Yeah its content delivery network essentially. It’s a bit more than that as well. But so often I go to my own website and it says there is no cache version of this website available, right. It doesn’t just send you through to the live version, it tells you there is no cache version, and then makes you click on a button, retry for the live version of the site.

Dan Sheerman:
Is there not something in settings that you can have it automatically redirect?

Paul Boag:
Maybe, but it’s not in the default settings and should be.

Dan Sheerman:
It seems like something that’s very silly if wasn’t in the settings…

Paul Boag:
Shut up Dan, you are pointing out it’s probably my problem and not their’s. So anyway, so Pastebot is another way of doing it as well. So that can obviously do anything that you can put in your clipboard. So it doesn’t have to just be photographs. But I love Photosync. It’s a great little tool. And I always seem to be copying stuff backwards and forwards from my iPhone, some reason I don’t know why.

Marcus Lillinton
Email does it really well actually.

Paul Boag:
Well the problem with doing it via email…

Dan Sheerman:
Tweeting stuff?

Paul Boag:
No okay, right. For tweeting no good, because you don’t want to share it with the world so that’s that written off. Email will often resize images.

Dan Sheerman:
I send it actual size.

Paul Boag:
You can send it actual size but it does have this desire to resize and if you are not careful you can end up resizing it. Also…

Dan Sheerman:
There’s a massive dialogue box that says what size do you want to send it…

Paul Boag:
Shut up.

Marcus Lillington:
Take him on. Paul, that is really bold.

Paul Boag:
Shut up. Also you have to wait for the email to arrive, it’s not as instantaneous.

Dan Sheerman:
Send it to yourself.

Paul Boag:
Even if you send it to yourself you still have got to wait for it.

Marcus Lillington:
It’s the same as syncing it with something else.

Dan Sheerman:
I love the fact that this entire conversation brings out the fact that the iPhone was the first phone that you basically couldn’t send photos over Bluetooth. We’d never have this problem if you could have sent photos.

Paul Boag:
That is true.

Dan Sheerman:
And you still can’t, because there’s no file system access even with sort of…

Paul Boag:
The lack of file system access is – I can understand it, but it is a pain in the arse.

Dan Sheerman:
It’s nice to be jail-broken.

Marcus Lillington:
One of the – that’s a good thing. And that’s one of the reasons why an iPad doesn’t appeal to me.

Paul Boag:
Right, lack of file system.

Marcus Lillington:
I don’t care on a phone. Phone is just a – it’s a phone. It does email – I need to read my email and that’s it really. But if I had an iPad I would like to be able to use it properly like I use a computer.

Dan Sheerman:
This is why I never really fell in love with mine. This is why don’t have one. I love my tiny little 11 inch Air. That comes everywhere with me and it has got a full physical keyboard and I know I am weird but…

Marcus Lillington:
I agree with you.

Paul Boag:
We should be discussing this on Wednesday really because by then we will know about the iPad mini.

Marcus Lillington:
Let’s do that, let’s talk about that on Wednesday because it’s just one of my favorite conversations.

Paul Boag:
Absolutely, although it has nothing to do with web design.

Dan Sheerman:
We will move on.

Marcus Lillington:
It doesn’t matter.

Paul Boag:
All right. I think that about wraps this up for this week’s show. This has been a really waffly show. Well done people. Thank you, Dan…

Dan Sheerman:
It’s all my fault, every time.

Paul Boag:
For taking us upon tangent upon a tangent. But to be honest as I had so little to say about some of these picks I think that was a good idea.

Marcus Lillington:
Yeah we have done really well, nearly an hour.

Paul Boag:
Nearly an hour, 90% pointless waffle. Mr. Drivelman will be very happy.

Marcus Lillington:
Oh yeah, well he’s long gone. Long gone ‘utter drivel.’

Paul Boag:
Utter, oh that does remind me of something I want to ask. Guys I really appreciate you listening to this show and we do love the fact that you are so great at telling other people about it and promoting it. One thing I would really appreciate mind, is if you would go and give us a review on iTunes. It does make a huge difference to our listing. I know it’s a pain in the ass. I feel like one of those people that are popping up a dialogue box when I am trying to use an app on the iPhone saying rate me, rate me.

Marcus Lillington:
Like us, like us.

Paul Boag:
Yeah. But I would really appreciate a little review if you could spare a couple of minutes and yeah we have now decided to be out in the open and not to go stealth anymore to get one over on the big web show or whatever. Do you know Jeffrey Zeldman hates me.

Marcus Lillington:
No he doesn’t. Rubbish.

Paul Boag:
No he does, seriously. Seriously. I have proof now.

Marcus Lillington:
Right, here we go.

Paul Boag:
That’s the other thing that I learned at Future of Web Apps. I knew there was a third thing and that is that Jeffrey Zeldman hates me. Jeffrey Zeldman was speaking at Future of Web Apps, right. I came up on the Tuesday, right. He arrived over the weekend and he left. We actually passed trains in the opposite direction. He left the capital city to avoid me. Then I said, Jeffrey are you going to the after party? Yeah Paul, I will be at the after party, I will see you there. He never turned up. All evening I just stood by the door waiting for Jeffrey Zeldman to be a little fan boy and he never turned up.

Dan Sheerman:
Now you know how it feels to be one of the little people.

Paul Boag:
I sound so arrogant. Right, yes Marcus let’s do a joke.

Marcus Lillington:
Let’s just do a quick joke here. Now as you all know I have been promoting the Boagworld app every week.

Paul Boag:
Which by the way hasn’t been updated for iPhone 5, and also doesn’t work on IOS6. So don’t bother downloading it.

Marcus Lillington:
It does work on IOS6.

Paul Boag:
Okay, yeah. I bet the things don’t update the news feeds. We have got a bug that needs fixing.

Marcus Lillington:
Okay don’t download the Boagworld app but it has got lots of old jokes on it which is what I am using this for and this one I think is my favorite of all time, it randomly appeared.

Paul Boag:
No pressure then.

Marcus Lillington:
Which probably means you have heard it four times before instead of just the once.

Paul Boag:
Right.

Marcus Lillington:
But anyway here we go. It’s such small text. So I need my glasses.

Paul Boag:
This is so funny.

Marcus Lillington:
In a little town there was an extremely proud father for having six kids. So proud that he called his wife, mother of six. But his wife hated this. So one day they were at a wedding and he yelled at her loudly so that everybody could hear them, ready to go mother of six? And she yelled back, of course I am, father of four.

Paul Boag:
That’s quite good. I don’t remember ever hearing that one.

Marcus Lillington:
No? Well ok…

Paul Boag:
You must have told it if it’s on the app. The app never lies.

Marcus Lillington:
Well yeah.

Paul Boag:
Do you think we ought to add a new section to the podcast for your jokes? Not to the podcast but to the – I suppose they are in the show notes, on the jokes in the show notes.

Marcus Lillington:
I guess they are.

Paul Boag:
Perhaps I need to, you know, I provide a jump link to each of the apps. Perhaps I need to allow people to jump specifically to the joke so that they can skip the rest of the waffle and just have the joke.

Marcus Lillington:
No, we’re not doing that.

Paul Boag:
It has to be a reward for enduring the rest of the show.

Marcus Lillington:
Exactly.

Paul Boag:
Okay, that’s great. Dan thanks very much for coming on the show with us and thank you guys for listening. We will return again next week with more utter drivel.

Marcus Lillington:
Bye.

Dan Sheerman:
Goodbye.

Headscape

Boagworld