Pixa, Smush.it, text expanders and Gusto

This week we organise our inspiration libraries, compress our clients images and speed up customer support. We also kick the butt on Diet Coda.

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Paul Boag
This week on Boagworld: a gorgeous image organizer, dealing with image performance, speeding up customer support and coding on your iPad.

Paul Boag
So here we are again.

Marcus Lillington
Here we are.

Paul Boag
A week later indeed and nothing has changed in my life.

Marcus Lillington
Indeed. It’s still dark outside during the middle of the day.

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
Most of the country is flooded.

Paul Boag
Yeah. And we are all doomed.

Marcus Lillington
We are all doomed.

Paul Boag
Well, it’s not long, is it, before the end of the world?

Marcus Lillington
Yeah what is it – December the …

Paul Boag
December 21st I think – 21st of the 12th – 2012.

Marcus Lillington
That is the Mexican thing, isn’t it?

Paul Boag
Mayan.

Marcus Lillington
Mayan?

Paul Boag
Yes. Well, same kind of area isn’t it.

Marcus Lillington
Well, kind of …. That’s where I saw the Mayan stuff; was in Mexico.

Paul Boag
Right.

Marcus Lillington
Very impressive, indeed.

Paul Boag
Yes.

Marcus Lillington
The buildings they made.

Paul Boag
They’re very clever.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, well the …

Paul Boag
But were they clever enough to predict the end of the world?

Marcus Lillington
It doesn’t really matter, does it? One way or the other.

Paul Boag
In fact – I don’t think – from what I can gather, I don’t think they were clever enough to predict it because I don’t think they were actually trying to predict it.

Marcus Lillington
No.

Paul Boag
Wasn’t it just that that is when they stopped doing their calendar?

Marcus Lillington
No, it’s because their calendar is – I think it is three calendars. It’s like a kind of a year calendar inside another, I don’t know, 25 generation calendar …

Paul Boag
Right.

Marcus Lillington
… that was inside this enormous…

Paul Boag
Overarching…

Marcus Lillington
…cycle calendar and this, I think, December the 21st this – 2012 – is when they all converge, so therefore the world is going to end, yeah.

Paul Boag
Or it might just get a little better, who knows. Let’s be more positive about it. Let’s say we enter a golden age of technological wonders where we all become Cyborgs. I don’t think that really is a golden age, is it? All right, we have …

Marcus Lillington
Well it depends on what you mean by Cyborg.

Paul Boag
We all have little robots that run around doing everything for us, including ….

Marcus Lillington
Well I don’t mind having …

Paul Boag
… including podcasts…Inside us.

Marcus Lillington
Little robots, tiny tiny little robots inside me as long as they’re doing good things

Paul Boag
… which brings us me on to the fact that I’ve started reading Hydrogen Sonata.

Marcus Lillington
Sonata, yes. Superb.

Paul Boag
Awesome book. Best culture book by far.

Marcus Lillington
It’s actually not.

Paul Boag
I think it is. Does it go downhill later?

Marcus Lillington
It doesn’t go downhill, you can just tell that he sets some things up that don’t come to anything.

Paul Boag
Right.

Marcus Lillington
It’s just a bit lazy.

Paul Boag
He has – he is a little bit like that. His books often tail off.

Marcus Lillington
The early books didn’t.

Paul Boag
Right, because accession kind of tailed off.

Marcus Lillington
Well not for me, it didn’t.

Paul Boag
Oh, didn’t it? Oh I thought it did.

Marcus Lillington
No, no it came to a huge crescendo which I thought was wonderful. But this one, it’s excellent. The way it ends is brilliant but this – one of the ships of the Kakanim [ph]…

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
…. Which has got the guy onboard who had sublimed and all this kind of thing, it doesn’t – it doesn’t really do anything in the rest of the story and it was like, well that’s disappointing, but it was like …

Paul Boag
Yeah, he feels like he should be a major character.

Marcus Lillington
Exactly, but then he obviously realized half way through that actually – I don’t need that one.

Paul Boag
Right.

Marcus Lillington
And it felt like a loose end. So, excellent, excellent read – loved every word of it, but it’s not his best book. So, there.

Paul Boag
Right. Oh, there we go. So you’ve ruined it now. I don’t feel I need – I don’t want to finish it.

Marcus Lillington
Oh, you must – it’s great.

Paul Boag
No, that’s it, you’ve ruined it. Now I know the Kakanim isn’t going anywhere…

Marcus Lillington
I can tell you everything that happens right now.

Paul Boag
He’s my favorite. Yeah but you’re not going to, are you? Because you like me, most of the time.

Marcus Lillington
Most of the time.

Paul Boag
Except for when I’m being annoying which is most of the time. So there we go.

Marcus Lillington
Paul, it’s – I don’t know what day of the week – it’s December now, isn’t it?

Paul Boag
It is. It’s Christmas time.

Marcus Lillington
Even though it’s not quite, but yeah…

Paul Boag
I just about…

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, when this goes out, it will be.

Christmas Gift Ideas

robot carrying christmas gift box with bow
Looking or a last minute gift for the geek in your life? Check out our gift suggestions.

Paul Boag
Have you seen my latest list post, on Boagworld?

Marcus Lillington
Your Christmas…

Paul Boag
My Christmas gifts.

Marcus Lillington
Well, I saw the title.

Paul Boag
Oh, I’ve got loads of gifts.

Marcus Lillington
Like what?

Paul Boag
Do you want to know some of them?

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, go on.

Paul Boag
We’ve got some…

Marcus Lillington
I watched the gadget show last night and saw some stuff on there that I thought, oh, I quite fancy that.

Paul Boag
This is far better. Well what did you see on the gadget show?

Marcus Lillington
Oh, now you’ve asked me.

Paul Boag
Yeah, well you started it.

Marcus Lillington
Oh it was – no, it was actually – it was on Steven Fry’s gadgetty thing. Did you see the wine opener?

Paul Boag
No. But I didn’t even see this program.

Marcus Lillington
£150,000.

Paul Boag
For a wine opener?

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, this thing is unbelievable. It’s handmade, it looks like something from Jules Verne.

Paul Boag
It would have to get itself out of the case and do it and walk across the room and open the bottle of wine for me and then pour it.

Marcus Lillington
It’s about that – I’m full arm’s width wide by about so tall, all in metal…

Paul Boag
Right.

Marcus Lillington
…. Kind of wheels and ratchets and things like that and you put the wine bottle on it and you put the glass on somewhere over there and you basically …

Paul Boag
Turn the handle.

Marcus Lillington
…you turn this handle and it takes the cork out and pours the wine for you.

Paul Boag
It pours it as well?

Marcus Lillington
It’s unbelievable.

Paul Boag
Oh, that sounds quite cool.

Marcus Lillington
And also it’s the most gorgeous thing you’ve ever seen. But that wasn’t it. I can’t remember what it was. There were so many things on there – oh, it was the Sue Veed steak machine which is a kind of cooking under pressure …

Paul Boag
Oh, right.

Marcus Lillington
… it looked really good. Yeah, but anyway that’s – so, yeah, tell me what are yours Paul?

Paul Boag
Well, these are all things that I actually own.

Marcus Lillington
Okay.

Paul Boag
It turned into a bit of a confession, really. The whole thing feels like I spend too much money on gadgets.

Marcus Lillington
Yes, you’re very – obviously very material Paul.

Paul Boag
I am, yes. I’ve got nowhere to go, I can’t deny it; I just have to go with it.

Marcus Lillington
See I just – when people say to me what do you want for Christmas I just say I want my friends around me.

Paul Boag
Oh, shut up. I hate people like you.

Marcus Lillington
It’s kind of true though. What I enjoy about Christmas is eating and drinking.

Paul Boag
Oh I, yeah, no I agree with that. That – if I had to pick one thing about Christmas, it would be the eating and drinking.

Marcus Lillington
So it’s like – and also …

Paul Boag
But I don’t ….

Marcus Lillington
…a friend of mine said the other day if I want something I go and buy it, kind of within reason.

Paul Boag
Yeah, well exactly that’s my problem with Christmas.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
That I’ve already bought everything I want. So anyway I’ve got things like the Magic Mouse charger pad, which is a conductive charger pad. So you never have to put batteries in your Magic Mouse again.

Marcus Lillington
Oh, I like the sound of that.

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
The bloody thing runs out all the time.

Paul Boag
Exactly. I’ve got on the first day of Christmas my true love said to me you’re costing me a fortune in batteries.

Marcus Lillington
Let me see that, I’ve got to get this up.

Paul Boag
So, this is Boagworld/reviews/geek-presents.

Marcus Lillington
It’s a homepage link, isn’t it?

Paul Boag
Or our homepage link at the moment …

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
.. but we probably won’t be by the time this goes out.

Marcus Lillington
Although you’d think that would be a useful one on the first week of December – to be on the homepage.

Paul Boag
No, no I released it on cyber Monday, which is yesterday.

Marcus Lillington
So, Magic Mouse charger, I will say you need to put your obviously rechargeable batteries in …

Paul Boag
You put, essentially it’s got like an energy pack that you replace, fits in where the current batteries fit in, and then you just – as, you know, when you’re done at the end of night you whack it on that little pad thing and it charges up.

Marcus Lillington
Right.

Paul Boag
And then take it off and off you go.

Marcus Lillington
Well I’m going to charge that to the company.

Paul Boag
Disgraceful.

Marcus Lillington
Well I charge batteries to the company.

Paul Boag
Yeah, that’s true. Then there is the HyperJuice – make sure you use the link in my show notes if you’re going to buy that, because …

Marcus Lillington
Obviously expensive, this next one.

Paul Boag
… the next one is really expensive, which is the HyperJuice external battery.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, that was £32 by the way, which I think is superb.

Paul Boag
Yeah, that is good I think for that. That was quite cheap.

Marcus Lillington
Magic Mouse charger, £32, must get one.

Paul Boag
The external battery is much more expensive, it’s like £350, well £370.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
But that’s for a big one, but that’s really useful when I go away in my motor home.

Marcus Lillington
Oh l see.

Paul Boag
That’s why I like that one.

Marcus Lillington
So that lasts you, what, a week or something.

Paul Boag
It’ll last a long time, yeah. It depends what you charge.

Marcus Lillington
But a little one would do you a playing flight sort of thing?

Paul Boag
Yeah that kind of thing.

Marcus Lillington
Okay.

Paul Boag
Then there is the Nikon P510, which I’ve just bought – which is very nice.

Marcus Lillington
I’ve found – we had a conversation about this, I like cameras that you can look through …

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
… proper optical viewer, but I equally I don’t wanted to carry around an enormous SLR camera, well I don’t, I’ve got one and I never take it out.

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
I was – I can’t remember where I was – Tesco, massive Tesco near where I live and they’ve got like a huge computer camera department …

Paul Boag
Yes.

Marcus Lillington
… and there was a Fujifilm really old fashioned looking, like the original 60s one.

Paul Boag
Yeah. Right.

Marcus Lillington
That is a digital camera, I don’t know 18 to 50 zoom, and a proper optical view through all for about £250.

Paul Boag
Are you sure it’s a proper optical and it’s not screen?

Marcus Lillington
Absolutely because it was turned off and I could see through it.

Paul Boag
Right. Okay. Yeah, fair enough. That’s quite good.

Marcus Lillington
So I was quite impressed with that. I hope it – yeah, I’m very tempted.

Paul Boag
So, no I’m really – I’m really happy with my Nikon.

Marcus Lillington
You’re saying this one has got like a little picture of it inside the viewer.

Paul Boag
Yeah, so it’s like you’re looking at a little monitor.

Marcus Lillington
Which is kind of okay because the point of a view– the reason why I like viewers is because if you are taking a photograph outside you can’t see the back of the camera.

Paul Boag
Exactly. So it works just as well, yeah, yeah.

Marcus Lillington
You’ve got to be able to look through it and it still does the job I guess.

Paul Boag
Yeah. Then there is the Eye-Fi X2

Marcus Lillington
How much was that one?

Paul Boag
What – the Nikon?

Marcus Lillington
£275, so it’s about the same price?

Paul Boag
Yeah. But this has got like a 42X optical zoom. It can really zoom into ridiculous proportions.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, that’s pretty cool actually.

Paul Boag
Then the next up is the Eye-Fi X2 and you can get this to go with your current SLR if it takes an SD card.

Marcus Lillington
No, it doesn’t. It’s a real old one that takes CF flash cards.

Paul Boag
Oh, okay. So this is quite…

Marcus Lillington
DLS 600…

Paul Boag
This is quite nice because essentially the Eye-Fi X2 is a little SD card that pops in but it creates its own Wi-Fi network. So it means that you – when you’re out and about you can transfer it to your iPad or your iPhone or up – and it will – well you can see your photographs instantly…

Marcus Lillington
That’s pretty cool.

Paul Boag
… which is pretty cool, not very expensive either. So, that’s s more expensive one I think I’m listing there. I think there is a cheaper one than that.

Marcus Lillington
I mean that is really nice if you’re on holiday…

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
… because on holiday you just have to look at the back of the camera going that looks all right. But being able to transfer it easily …

Paul Boag
And also of course if you put it onto your phone then potentially, you wouldn’t want to do that abroad, but in the U.K. you could then upload it straight to the internet if you wanted to, which is really good. I put the Drobo in because I’m obsessed with my Drobo. Evernote Premium account.

Marcus Lillington
Drobo is like buying somebody a saucepan though for Christmas, isn’t it?

Paul Boag
No.

Marcus Lillington
It’s not sexy in any way, shape or form; it’s a storage system, it’s like a cupboard.

Paul Boag
I think it’s sexy.

Marcus Lillington
It’s not.

Paul Boag
It’s sexy – look at that picture of it. Look, that’s like …

Marcus Lillington
But it doesn’t do anything.

Paul Boag
…all black and glossy and it has got lights on. It does do something; it protects your valuable data.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, that’s not cutting it any way. Move on.

Paul Boag
There is Evernote Premium account for £35 a year.

Marcus Lillington
What do you get for your £35?

Paul Boag
You get a lot more storage, which is not …

Marcus Lillington
Yeah. Fair enough.

Paul Boag
… a massive thing, but the most – the coolest thing is it allows you to search inside of PDF files.

Marcus Lillington
That’s cool, is it?

Paul Boag
That is really useful because every time I scan something in, it creates a PDF file.

Marcus Lillington
Oh, right. Well, yes then it is very, very useful, yes.

Paul Boag
Yeah, which brings me onto the next thing; this by the way is not part of the show. I wasn’t intending to go through this list.

Marcus Lillington
Well, I had a question actually …

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
… which was: when do we break up for Christmas headmaster?

Paul Boag
I don’t know, I hadn’t thought about that. Shall we have a look? Let’s have a look at the calendar.

Marcus Lillington
Because if this is December the…

Paul Boag
Well we will need to go…

Marcus Lillington
5th, 6th…whatever.

Paul Boag
… yeah, we will need to go right up to the week before Christmas, won’t we? And then well, I don’t know if we can. We do what we want can’t we really? It’s our show. Screw it, let’s wait until last one. No, I’m thinking we will go up to – yeah, we’ll do right up to the 20th.

Marcus Lillington
Okay.

Paul Boag
We might as well. We’re at work…

Marcus Lillington
So that means another three or four shows, doesn’t it?

Paul Boag
Yeah, that’s fine. Okay and then we will come back – when should we come back, let’s have a look. Come back about the 8th maybe …?

Marcus Lillington
Yeah. We might want to do the one after that.

Paul Boag
Yeah, might do the 15th, sorry the week of the 17th.

Marcus Lillington
Yes.

Paul Boag
Okay, cool. Well we’ll come up with something along those lines anyway. So, yeah next one on the list was my ScanSnap, my little scanner that allows me to go paperless and scans directly into Evernote. So I really love this. You have no interest in that, have you?

Marcus Lillington
Boo.

Paul Boag
Boo, not. What about the UP by Jawbone, get you fit Marcus. No?

Marcus Lillington
What is it?

Paul Boag
It’s a little bracelet, see the little bracelet?

Marcus Lillington
Trouble sleeping? No. Oh, it’s a bracelet.

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
I don’t like wearing things around my wrists.

Paul Boag
Okay, that’s that one written off then.

Marcus Lillington
No, no but other people might. What does it do?

Paul Boag
It basically does two things. So there’s loads of these fitness app things around at the moment, right, where you wear something and when you do exercise it tracks you, right. I think Nike Fuel band is probably the most well known but there is Fitbit and various others and now I’ve tried all of these things because I’m obsessional like that. And the UP by Jawbone is by far my favorite, because it’s got a 10-hour – sorry, a 10-day battery life because it doesn’t have a screen. You can wear all the time, so you can even wear it in the shower. And it not only tracks your fitness, but it will also track your sleep patterns, which for me is really cool.

Marcus Lillington
Okay.

Paul Boag
Because my sleep sucks.

Marcus Lillington
I remember what it was on the gadget show.

Paul Boag
What was that?

Marcus Lillington
It was the Bose Wi-Fi dock. The really, really kind of portable one …

Paul Boag
Yes.

Marcus Lillington
The one that’s got like a lid on it.

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
£200, oh £170, something like that.

Paul Boag
Really interesting.

Marcus Lillington
And it’s really nice.

Paul Boag
Really interesting you brought that up. One of the things that isn’t on this list that I bought on Saturday – we had our pre- – we had a pre-Christmas on Saturday. We were all feeling really down for some reason on Friday night, so we decided we were going to have a mini Christmas day on Saturday. So we had – we had called it Christmas – yeah the new Christmas and then Christmas day is going to be Christmas strikes back and then James’ birthday is going to be the return of Christmas. So, we had a little Christmas, so we went on a spending spree, it was disgraceful. So James got Assassin’s Creed III …

Marcus Lillington
Right.

Paul Boag
… my wife got a new kettle, a new toaster and a soup maker. Soup maker, awesome, I’m in love with soup makers and …

Marcus Lillington
Well on Steven Fry’s one…

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
… he had a soup maker.

Paul Boag
Really?

Marcus Lillington
That was …

Paul Boag
Made of gold.

Marcus Lillington
… no, it has no heater in it, it makes – it heats the soup up through the speed of the blades.

Paul Boag
Wow!

Marcus Lillington
Expensive though – it was about £600.

Paul Boag
Flip me.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
That is incredible. But you couldn’t have chunky soup in that then?

Marcus Lillington
No. Absolutely not, but yeah it was like – because it was like – it’s a soup maker. So what, we’ve got one of those. And it was like…erm…oh, oh, I see.

Paul Boag
That’s cool.

Marcus Lillington
Yes, that is very cool.

Paul Boag
And then I bought a Jawbone BIG JAMBOX …

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
… which is their kind of equivalent of it. Sound is really good out of it, so my wife tells me; I’m as deaf as a post.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, they didn’t rate that one very high.

Paul Boag
I like it. I liked it a lot.

Marcus Lillington
But – yeah, the Bose one because they did it on, because I’m being – I was shouting at the television, as I often do, they had him how far away it could go from the music …

Paul Boag
Right.

Marcus Lillington
… as the test. The second test is what does it sound like. And I’m like who cares how far away…

Paul Boag
Yeah, that’s not an issue.

Marcus Lillington
You know. So it was to make it more of a competition because basically the Bose didn’t do that well on the how far away …

Paul Boag
Right.

Marcus Lillington
… but it’s still won by miles on the sound test.

Paul Boag
Oh, that was the other things. My wife bought herself some Bose headphones …

Marcus Lillington
Nice.

Paul Boag
… which was very nice, yeah.

Marcus Lillington
What like the ones you’ve got?

Paul Boag
No, not the ones I’ve got. She don’t like the ones because they’re too over the ear so they – her ears get hot less.

Marcus Lillington
Guarantee she’ll never listen to this; we can say what we like about her.

Paul Boag
Yeah, they’re not in-ears ones but they kind of sit on top of the ears.

Marcus Lillington
Yes, I know the ones.

Paul Boag
The middle ones.

Marcus Lillington
I like that completely over – like the ones I’m wearing now.

Paul Boag
Yeah. I do as well. Because they block…

Marcus Lillington
Because they’re comfortable.

Paul Boag
Yeah, they’re comfortable …

Marcus Lillington
They don’t feel like they’re squishing your ears…

Paul Boag
Exactly.

Marcus Lillington
… not inside your ears which is uncomfortable so these are great.

Paul Boag
And they block out the sound, I think, really well.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
Next one up is the Belkin Wemo, right. This is geekdom taken to an extreme.

Marcus Lillington
What on earth is this?

Paul Boag
So this is a plug socket. You plug it into the wall and you can plug things into it, right? And it turns on and off. Sounds good, doesn’t it?

Marcus Lillington
So it’s a timer?

Paul Boag
It’s a little bit like a timer. You can set a timer on it.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
But it’s also controllable by your iPhone, so if you go out and you – I’ve got it plugged into my office fire and sometimes I go out and forget to turn the fire – it cost me a fortune the fire in my office because it – it’s heating a big room and its electric. So I can remember to turn it off, okay big deal. But here is where it gets cool; here is where we enter a realm of geekiness previously unknown to man, right.

Marcus Lillington
Okay, yeah.

Paul Boag
There is this service which we’ve talked about on the show before called IFTTT.com.

Marcus Lillington
Is this then that?

Paul Boag
Yeah. This enables you to set up all kinds of rules that control turning this thing on and off, right. So you can say when the sun sets turn on the lights or when the temperature drops below a certain level, turn on the fire.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah. That’s kind of cool.

Paul Boag
That’s kind of thing and it so it goes on. So, yeah I’ve got one of those. £47 for that.

Marcus Lillington
That’s quite cool actually.

Paul Boag
I know, but is it worth £47? Because really what you need to do is kind of have them all round the house.

Marcus Lillington
Exactly; one is not enough.

Paul Boag
No, you need like a dozen at least.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
But at £47 a pop that’s not really very feasible but that is quite cool.

Marcus Lillington
Surely, somebody is going to just…

Paul Boag
They will come down.

Marcus Lillington
… make up one that does lots of different things, rather than just one thing.

Paul Boag
What do you mean?

Marcus Lillington
You could have this so that its – you’re able to basically plug something in it.

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
But it would be – if you could plug lots of things into it, then …

Paul Boag
Oh, into one, well you could do. What you could do is you could obviously plug an extension cable into it.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
Everything needs to be near it, doesn’t it?

Marcus Lillington
That’s true, yeah.

Paul Boag
But what they are producing is light bulbs that are Wi-Fi controlled, right? That’s kind of cool, not Belkin by other people. They do also sell a sensor motion detector thing as well …

Marcus Lillington
Okay.

Paul Boag
… as you can see – that little duberry that’s sticking out in the picture.

Marcus Lillington
Oh, I see, right.

Paul Boag
But I haven’t got that. Next one is a set of books, Wake, Watch and Wonder, which I’ve told you about before, haven’t I?

Marcus Lillington
Yeah. I’ve read the first one.

Paul Boag
So this is a series of books that talk about the web becoming, well they call it an emergent – what is it, an emergent intelligence or something.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
The web becoming senscient basically which sounds really corny but it’s really well done. So I thought I would throw that in.

Marcus Lillington
It’s not as good as Iain Banks.

Paul Boag
No, it’s not, but I…

Marcus Lillington
It’s a little bit teenage.

Paul Boag
Is it?

Marcus Lillington
I found it a bit, yeah.

Paul Boag
Maybe, I don’t know. No, I don’t know, only because it’s got a teenage character in it.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, okay. I bought the next one, so I will read that. Because it can’t be that bad.

Paul Boag
No, no, they’re good. I mean, I don’t say they’re the best, you know, it’s an arbitrary thing; I’ve picked a random set of books that I like. The Logitech Ultrathin keyboard which I love, which is that magnetic keyboard, well essentially it’s a smart cover for your iPad. But also you can then drop the iPad into a groove and it’s a – the smart cover has also got a keyboard – a physical keyboard on it, Bluetooth physical keyboard, you can drop your iPad into a groove where it’s magnetically connected, very similar in a lot of ways to the Windows Surface.

Marcus Lillington
The new Surface.

Paul Boag
Yeah, that’s just been released, but obviously with your iPad. And then finally, I finished …

Marcus Lillington
Is this Surface a proper computer though, or is it like an iPad – just a kind of surfing device?

Paul Boag
I think it’s a proper computer.

Marcus Lillington
See because that’s cool…very, very cool.

Paul Boag
Yeah. Yeah, absolutely. I don’t know quite, I haven’t looked at the software, but I think it’s pretty heavy-duty. And then finally, it’s Printstagram, which is basically you can take your Instagram pictures and you can get them printed off into lovely little cute printy things, little kind of almost like polaroids. They’re really lovely. I bought a load and I gotten stuck all over my pin boards, I look up and there is all my life in picture form which is lovely. So that’s a – yeah, there is a little post. Really we should have saved all of that for the Christmas special.

Marcus Lillington
Should have done by …

Paul Boag
By which time it’s too late to buy them

Marcus Lillington
Yeah too late to go and buy them, I have to say that I like some of those things.

Paul Boag
Yeah. Which one would you buy, it sounds like the Magic Mouse charger.

Marcus Lillington
Magic Mouse charger, definitely, just because it’s always running out.

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
… as is the keyboard to be fair.

Paul Boag
Yeah. But not a keyboard solution for that. And then the Eye-Fi you quite liked it, didn’t you?

Marcus Lillington
Yes, external battery, not really. A new camera, yes definitely, but maybe not that one.

Paul Boag
Yeah. And you quite liked the Belkin Wemo?

Marcus Lillington
Yeah and the Eye-Fix, Drobo got one. Evernote, don’t really use it. ScanSnap, I properly should use them and all that but I don’t. Up, no chance. Yeah, the Wemo really cool. I’m reading the books, I don’t have an iPad, so …

Paul Boag
What about the Prints, you don’t use Instagram much, do you?

Marcus Lillington
No, well I do and I don’t but I mean I’m quite happy making my own…

Paul Boag
…little pictures.

Marcus Lillington
I make my own. I’ve got loads of print.

Paul Boag
You print them out do you?

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, I’ve got loads of photo paper, tons of it.

Paul Boag
Oh, I can never be arsed.

Marcus Lillington
Because they can make all different sizes, you can make collages, all those kind of stuff. I love doing all that.

Paul Boag
Yeah. Well, okay so should we move on and start the show now.

Marcus Lillington
Probably we should.

Pixa

Pixa App
Pixa is one of the best tools I have seen for organising large libraries of images and sharing them with work collages across multiple locations.

Paul Boag
Let’s do our first pick of the week. All right. So our first pick as always is for our designers in the audience. It’s because we love them more.

Marcus Lillington
The most.

Paul Boag
If you’re a website owner, or a developer we don’t like you that much.

Marcus Lillington
Yes, that’s …

Paul Boag
Actually that’s not true. The website owners, they’re the people that turn into clients. So we like them the best.

Marcus Lillington
Music is the only app that I know anything about as well. So I quite look forward to that one.

Paul Boag
Yeah, it’s not a very exciting one this for website owners, but the designer one, I’m really excited about because it solves a problem that we have had forever, right.

Marcus Lillington
I saw this on – I saw it on the app store.

Paul Boag
Right.

Marcus Lillington
I didn’t read about it. Just that I liked the icon.

Paul Boag
It’s called Pixa, essentially it solves the problem that we have at headscape, right. So we have several designers and we’re all spread out all over the place. We all keep our little inspiration library, stuff that we think is cool, all right. And it’s a real shame that we can’t really share that very well together, okay. Also keeping your inspiration library even if you can share it, it’s still a pain in the ass, right because you have to tag everything and you have to set, do it things like tag it with color and all kinds of different criteria, tagging is a pain in the ass and then you have another program which is grabbing the screenshots that you then drag into this program. We’ve tried lots of different things, but nothing is really kind of worked particularly well until Pixa. Pixa looks really good. It’s an app for organizing your images and it does it wonderfully. First thing to say is it, it syncs via Dropbox. So what one designer has all designers have, which for us is invaluable, I recognize it’s not as invaluable for everybody, but it is pretty good for us. It also makes organizing stuff really easy. So you can organize stuff into folders and types and you can sort by different file types and it supports all kinds of image formats including I noticed PSD’s which is really good and illustrator files as well as all the kind of normal. So it even supports Pixelmator

Marcus Lillington
Pixelmator, yeah.

Paul Boag
… which is superb. Icons as well it supports, so it really has a – really broad range of file types that it supports.

Marcus Lillington:
Why do all app websites look exactly the same.

Paul Boag
They do, don’t they? Mac app websites…

Marcus Lillington
Grey, one page, one site kind of style …

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
… long, long page.

Paul Boag
Usually with a big kind of carouselly thing at the top?

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
Although theirs wins out. This is at pixer-app.com. Theirs wins out because when you click on any one of those grey icons down on the left hand side, see what happens to the carousel.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah you can actually grab that little pink tab on the other side.

Paul Boag
Oh, can you?

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, pull it and it does…

Paul Boag
So you get this little animation effect when you click on stuff; the whole thing wobbles, pointlessly.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, pointless wobble but I like it.

Paul Boag
Kind of cool. I kind of like that. Yeah, that’s nice, design details, Design Delighters, which we’ve talked about in the show. Yes it can organize stuff well. It also auto tags, which is great because tagging image is possibly the most boring job on the face of the planet.

Marcus Lillington
Wouldn’t it be good, if all images ever taken on digital format, could automatically be tagged back in history.

Paul Boag
That will be brilliant. That will be wonderful. So it tags – basically it can tag images which you drag them in by color and size, which is a good start. It also appends metadata like web addresses, extensions that kind of stuff to images that you import. So it has got a really good tagging system that I love. It’s got a function actually called live folders, which is great because it means that you can organize your images without necessarily moving them from their original location. It’s like a smart search basically that we’re coming to expect more and more of Mac Apps. It’s got really good export features and sharing features, which is really useful as well. Like I said, it syncs via Dropbox, it also syncs by Google Drive and you can also share images via Dropbox or Cloud App as well. It’s got built in screen shot grabbing facility and then finally it’s got a, what do they call that …LoopIt

Marcus Lillington
Sorry, I’ve gone off on to the people that make it.

Paul Boag
Oh Right.

Marcus Lillington
They’re called Shiny Frog and they’re based in Italy. It’s kind of cool.

Paul Boag
Yes. They’ve got one of those Zoom Me In tools, I want to call it a Loupe Tool, that isn’t right

Marcus Lillington
Sorry, I should …

Paul Boag
What do they call it, let’s see how my computer pronounces it.

Marcus Lillington
Zoom me in tool Loupe.

Paul Boag
It’s just a Loupe?

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
Well, that’s dull. It’s got an E on the end, surely it should be Loupe which sounds far cooler.

Marcus Lillington
I would think it’s just Loupe.

Paul Boag
Right.

Marcus Lillington
Because Loupe, the word Loupe is spelled Loop.

Paul Boag
You do realize everybody is laughing at us now because it’s a really well known term that I’ve never heard it pronounced out loud. So there we are. So you can do things like with using this tool you can copy colors from the image to your clipboard…ow I just smashed myself in the face.

Marcus Lillington
Oh dear. What can I say? Apparently people were laughing at us earlier for being idiots. I wasn’t sure, now I am.

Paul Boag
Oh that really hurt. What an idiot. Oh, you’ve so got to edit this out. You’re not going to, are you?

Marcus Lillington
No chance, no.

Paul Boag
I hate you.

Marcus Lillington
Okay.

Paul Boag
Compose myself, right. Yes, so it’s …

Marcus Lillington
It’s an image sharing thing, it’s very good.

Paul Boag
Should we move on?

Marcus Lillington
Yes.

Smush it

Smush.it for WordPress
If you have clients uploading images and want to maintain performance, I highly recommend installing the Smush.it plugin for wordpress.

Paul Boag
Okay, I’m going to give up. Okay. So we come on to our developer tool of the week …

Marcus Lillington
How is your nose, Paul?

Paul Boag
You’re going to edit it out. It’s fine. Well stop referencing it.

Marcus Lillington
Paul’s nose, Paul’s nose, Paul’s nose. Yes, I have to amuse myself during this section.

Paul Boag
No, it’s going to be interesting, I’m going to have you onboard.

Marcus Lillington
Okay.

Paul Boag
Right, so big, big issue these days is image download time, right. Websites, with the several kind of aspects to this, right.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
First is the fact that websites have become increasingly bloated, websites are getting really damn big these days.

Marcus Lillington
Which is kind of fair enough.

Paul Boag
No.

Marcus Lillington
I said kind of …

Paul Boag
Not in anyway.

Marcus Lillington
It depends how – well, you didn’t know I was going to say carry on.

Paul Boag
No, no you can’t – no, you justify your position.

Marcus Lillington
You said no, you don’t know what I was going to say.

Paul Boag
But what about people using mobile devices?

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, fair enough.

Paul Boag
What about people in third world countries?

Marcus Lillington
Fair enough. That’s why I said kind of …

Paul Boag
In what way is it acceptable?

Marcus Lillington
Just a kind of its …

Paul Boag
I need somebody new.

Marcus Lillington
All right, it’s expected, I suppose it’s not the ….

Paul Boag
It’s not unsurprising.

Marcus Lillington
Exactly.

Paul Boag
I will give you that.

Marcus Lillington
I guess, and it’s a bit – it’s a bit like any kind of accessibility related issue. You need to find a line where something is acceptable

Paul Boag
Yes.

Marcus Lillington
Or whether you just kind of going over the top for a tiny, tiny, tiny amount of users.

Paul Boag
I agree. I mean the thing is…

Marcus Lillington
I honestly don’t know the answer. I’m flannelling here.

Paul Boag
No, no. I – yes, absolutely, I mean, the third world one I gave is fairly naff – for a lot of people they’re not trying to reach developing world or whatever else, so it’s not as big a deal, but certainly mobile devices, things need to keep – be kept pretty snappy.

Marcus Lillington
So you haven’t got your 4G connection yet, Paul?

Paul Boag
That’s a really sore subject. So we’re not going to dwell on it.

Marcus Lillington
Oh, was this the problem you have with your local supplier.

Paul Boag
Yes, I’m going to have words with EE.

Marcus Lillington
EE?

Paul Boag
Oh no, you’re talking – are you talking is your 4G mobile or are you talking about the fact that I’m also bitter and twisted about the fact that everybody else in Blandford seems to have BT Infinity or whatever it is, but my little cul de sac doesn’t.

Marcus Lillington
Really I didn’t know that.

Paul Boag
All of my friends, even my parents now have like 100 megabytes download.

Marcus Lillington
Well, I heard the other day that my little village will be getting it in 2014.

Paul Boag
My word, that’s incredible. So anyway, yes so performance is a big issue. And actually it was interesting Dan Sherman wrote an interesting post

Marcus Lillington
Shearman.

Paul Boag
Shearman. What did I say?

Marcus Lillington
Sherman.

Paul Boag
I like to do that just to annoy him. Not that he ever listens to the show except for when he’s on it because he’s vain like that.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, every word.

Paul Boag
Every word, yeah. So he wrote a really interesting post about dealing with large images on mobile versions of your website. He actually proposed you do nothing, because he was saying that a lot of cellular network suppliers actually compress the hell out of images before they deliver them, which seems to be true in England, we discovered. But not so much around the rest of the world because we did a load of tests on this before we – by we I mean Dan obviously. I did nothing, but Dan did some loads of tests on this before …

Marcus Lillington
He went to America and then went to France

Paul Boag
Well, he didn’t, he only tested U.K., in fact, I think he probably only tested his own network, it was really very scientifically and well researched. Turns out that not every network provider does this, so it is a really good article, definitely check it out and it does apply depending on your circumstances it may very well be applicable, but we need to be compressing images, we need to be getting images as small as we can. Now there is a tool out there which Yahoo provided called Smush.it, so SMUSH.IT which essentially what you do is you throw some images at it, and you upload some images and it smushes them…

Marcus Lillington
Cool.

Paul Boag
… it compresses them down and makes them nice and small fast, which is all well and good, except then your client comes along and uploads something to their WordPress blog, some massive image that they haven’t bothered to resize properly. And although WordPress will resize it for them, it won’t Smush it and compress it as well as it could do. Fortunately, I have discovered there is a WordPress plug-in for this, which will automatically smush your, I feel stupid saying smush your files, but …

Marcus Lillington
I like the word smush actually, to smush.

Paul Boag
To smush, yes. It will smush your files as you upload them.

Marcus Lillington
That’s probably a very rude word in some places in the world.

Paul Boag
Yeah, well a lot of words are rude words in some places of the world, which is what keeps life interesting I always find. Yes, so basically you can upload a file just through the normal kind of Media Library and WordPress and it will smush it and compress it, you don’t need WordPress for this by the way, you can use it directly with Yahoo and it has an API build into it, so you can pass stuff through their API to smush it off that. This is particularly important because as we said before on the show, now things like Photoshop are really rubbish. We did a …

Marcus Lillington
PNG.

Paul Boag
… PNG compression.

Marcus Lillington
Maker a smallerer.

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
Have you seen their website, just to change the subject– trying to change the subject called yosemitepark.com.

Paul Boag
No.

Marcus Lillington
Have a look. Just – it just reminded me we’re talking about big images.

Paul Boag
How is , I forgotten how you spell Yosemite?

Marcus Lillington
Yosemitepark.com

Paul Boag
I had a complete mental block then.

Marcus Lillington
I would love to see what this one does on mobile.

Paul Boag
Chucka chug chug. Chucka chug chug bid, chucka chug…bloody hell.

Marcus Lillington
It’s quite impressive, isn’t it?

Paul Boag
Yeah, that’s a big image.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
But, oh and a series – oh, no it’s multiple.

Marcus Lillington
Two big images …

Paul Boag
Wow.

Marcus Lillington
… but still really rather lovely.

Paul Boag
It is lovely. Well Yosemite is lovely, I love it.

Marcus Lillington
So – yeah, they just – I just thought of a site that uses that relies on massive images.

Paul Boag
Absolutely.

Marcus Lillington
So it’s kind of …

Paul Boag
So it will be great, you run this, you can smush it through it and it will get the best out of it, it possibly can.

Marcus Lillington
Really? I mean, that’s when I go will it still look good?

Paul Boag
Yeah. I have never been able to well without being really super picky, you cannot tell the difference.

Marcus Lillington
Okay.

Paul Boag
It’s about – it’s not reducing the compression, it’s not increasing the compression level. It’s just about doing it in a more intelligent way from what I can gather.

Marcus Lillington
Okay.

Paul Boag
Exactly like that PNG tool that we reviewed before, but it’s – what I like about this is it’s kind of baked into the content management system and whatever else that you’re using, using the API, which means that you can – clients can do it. That’s the key. It is making it, so the clients can do it.

Marcus Lillington
Nice.

Paul Boag
And now I use it all the time, my own blog because, let’s face it, when you’re trying to churn out a blog post you’re often lazy about things like that and now I know that whenever I upload anything to WordPress it will be as small as it can be, which is absolutely great and I love it. So that is our developer tool for the week.

Text Expanders

TextExpander for the mac
TextExpander for the mac is a superb tool for dealing with customer support emails. However, that is only the tip of the iceberg in terms of how this application can save anybody time.

Paul Boag
Let’s move on to our exciting website owner tool. Okay. So, our website owner’s tool is – it’s actually quite a good one. It’s a funny one. It’s a really useful one, but not very sexy.

Marcus Lillington
Okay.

Paul Boag
In fact he’s two and they’re both provided by Thomas Jay, who has very nicely suggested them at boagworld.com/apps. You know you want to make a suggestion too. And they’re…

Marcus Lillington
Do it, right now.

Paul Boag
… yeah, we’ll wait. They’re called PhraseExpress for windows and TextExpander for Mac. Now these – have you – you must have come across anything TestExpander, Marcus, surely?

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, I’ve heard of it, yeah, but I’ve never used it.

Paul Boag
You’ve never used it.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, I know what it does.

Paul Boag
Right. So essentially these are tools that expand text.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, but you can create your own…

Paul Boag
…you set up your own macros, right. So, for example, at the most basic level, one of my macros is I can type sig or – I could do ssig so it’s not something you accidentally type in another word – and it will automatically expand my email signature, right?

Marcus Lillington
Yeah. Is this for Mac or iPhone or everything?

Paul Boag
No, this is Mac or Windows. Oh and they do have an iPhone app as well, but it’s a bit fiddly. Forget the iPhone app. I don’t – I haven’t got a lot of time with it.

Marcus Lillington
Okay. Surely that would be a place where you’d really want it?

Paul Boag
Much more useful. Yeah, the problem is limitations on the iPhone in terms of you can’t mess with other apps if that make sense. So if you’re in mail …

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
… and writing an email, it can’t expand a mail, you have to open TextExpander, write in TextExpander and then copy and paste it across to mail. Yeah, exactly, which is not their fault; it’s a limitation of – but of course now iPhone has got that built in, you do know that?

Marcus Lillington
Yes, yes.

Paul Boag
Yeah. So, it’s got this kind of functionality built into it anyway. But on your Mac and on your Windows devices, this is absolutely indispensable for me. It’s actually not just great for website owners, it is great for everyone. So for example a coder, I’ve got – sometimes you find yourself, if you’ve got a good coding environment it will expand your code anyway, we talked last week didn’t we about zen coding that …

Marcus Lillington
Yes.

Paul Boag
.. does this or whatever it’s called now. But that only works in your code editor. Say if you’re writing a piece of code, I don’t know, within a field on a website, I’ve now got things where I can type in H3 and it will expand out an H3 ref or whatever else, okay? So really, really useful for that kind of stuff. Why it’s particularly useful for website owners is customer support, right. If you’re anything like me you will get emails again and again and again basically asking the same questions, right.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
So in my case it’s we’ve sent you through this press release for this cool project and I have to write back going, I don’t care, but in nicer words than that …

Marcus Lillington
Yes.

Paul Boag
… or I get I’m having trouble downloading the app – sorry, your client centric web design eBook available now for £6.25 or £6.75 or whatever it is, buy it on the website, link in the show notes. But I’m having …

Marcus Lillington
Surely everyone in the world has got a copy by now.

Paul Boag
Obviously, yeah. But I’m having a problem downloading it for whatever reason …

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
… or…and so it goes on, you get the kind of idea: of these emails you’re getting again and again. So what I do with TextExpander is essentially I write it once, go “I’m going to turn that into a snippit,” job done. Now the problem that you might have – I haven’t used PhraseExpress on Windows, so I don’t know whether it does it, what I’m going to say now, but certainly it does it on TextExpander. The problem you have sometimes is that there are certain elements. So another thing that I always do is consultancy clinics, right, which is these where people can buy 30 minutes of my time and I will help them with whatever problem they’ve got, right, within reason, web-related. I don’t help them with their hemorrhoids. Yeah, that’s just completely thrown me now. So – but obviously I have to send out an email, I have to say look this is the service, this is how it works but I also have to drop in certain custom bits of information into that like what time I propose we do it, how long we do it for what the total you will be charged will be; that kind of thing.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
So what you can do with TextExpander is put in kind of holding snippets for that kind of information, so you go: “Hi George, how about [insert date]” as, you know, the time we meet.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
And then what happens is when you do the expansion, so I type CC for Consultancy Clinic, instead of immediately expanding, it pops up basically a little – the email in a separate window with kind of fields that you could fill in the missing details and then it kind of plops it all into your email.

Marcus Lillington
That’s pretty good.

Paul Boag
So it’s a really useful tool for dealing with those kind of repetitive tasks. So in your case I could imagine you know those inquiries we always get through where – they’re too small for us, they’re not really our kind of work.

Marcus Lillington
My name is Dave, I’m 19 …

Paul Boag
Yes.

Marcus Lillington
… I want to reinvent Twitter …

Paul Boag
Facebook. Yeah, absolutely.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
So, you know, a polite kind of ‘piss off email.’ I could imagine it being great for that. I could imagine it being good for when you have to mark up something in HTML and you want to be able to – here is an image tag, fill in the alt field and the source field, you know, that kind of stuff.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, definitely – useful.

Paul Boag
Good little app, like it a lot, check it out, I don’t know the Windows version as well, but Thomas says that it’s very similar. So try them both out, see what you think. I think you will find them indispensable – I certainly do.

Gusto

Gusto App
Although not as visually attractive as Diet Coda, Gusto is considerably more powerful and makes code editing on the iPad fully functional.

Paul Boag
So our random mobile app of the week has been suggested by a Senghen.

Marcus Lillington
Who?

Paul Boag
Senghen, S-E-N-G-H-E-N.

Marcus Lillington
Senghen.

Paul Boag
Senghen.

Marcus Lillington
Okay.

Paul Boag
I think that’s a cool name. Any name …

Marcus Lillington
It is.

Paul Boag
… that rhymes is cool.

Marcus Lillington
It doesn’t quite rhyme.

Paul Boag
No, but it has kind of got that – well there is probably a fancy word for it that I don’t know.

Marcus Lillington
So, are we talking male or female?

Paul Boag
So, the app is Gusto, which is a great little app. A few – a little while ago we covered on the show when we’re talking about Coda, we talked about Diet Coda, do you remember that?

Marcus Lillington
Yes.

Paul Boag
So Diet Coda is the iPad addition of Coda, the coding environment.

Marcus Lillington
That you said is great but it’s fatally flawed.

Paul Boag
Yes.

Marcus Lillington
See, I do pay attention.

Paul Boag
You do. Can you remember why it was fatally flawed?

Marcus Lillington
No.

Paul Boag
No, it was fatally flawed because – it is a beautiful app, it’s so well designed, it’s a lovely coding environment and in many ways far superior to Gusto, which is another coding environment that pre-dated it. I think Coda did a lot of things much better than Gusto has, but as you say it’s fatally flawed. And it’s fatally flawed because you can only edit the live site.

Marcus Lillington
Right. And that’s because iPads don’t have – you can’t get it …

Paul Boag
There is no file structure …

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
… somehow however, Gusto have worked around this problem. Don’t understand how, but from – I haven’t actually played with this, but I’m reliably informed by our wonderful Senghen, that this essentially deals with the problem. So it’s a full coding environment, it’s not quite as pretty as Diet Coda, but that’s just a pretty thing. I don’t think – there are some few little details of Diet Coda I really like, like its selection tools when you’re trying to select the line of code, but other than that it looks very, very similar – does similar kind of stuff. But this one allows you to essentially download documents over – from the web via FTP or SFTP as well, so you can download multiple files and then you can edit them, but then you can – and I quote – “preview your document locally to quickly see your updates. And then when you’re done, you can transfer it back up again.” That I find very impressive. How it quite achieves this minor miracle I’m not so sure, but it’s certainly, certainly very good. You could also – ah here is a really interesting one, wow this is more, again, better than Coda does. You could import projects in connections from transmit FileZilla, Dreamweaver, Cyberduck and get this Coda. Now how dumb is this? You can’t do that in Diet Coda …

Marcus Lillington
Okay.

Paul Boag
… which is ridiculous. You know I expected when I open Diet Coda for it to magically sync with coder on my Mac, so I’d have all the same projects set up and it doesn’t do it. So that looks really quite good – good to me, I’m really quite impressed at it, definitely worth checking out and at a massive tone of only £6.99.

Marcus Lillington
Diet Coda is £13.99.

Paul Boag
Yeah. So there you go, worth considering. It has got really good ratings and yeah – get it. Also – and here is another one, recently it’s now available – that there is also – check out Gusto Mobile for the iPhone and the iPod. So they’ve managed to get a full working HTML code editor for iPhone and iPod as well. That must be flipping fiddly. I’ve got to look at it now. Let’s have a look, see what that one looks like.”Web development in your pocket.” My word. Yeah, that looks like a code editor and it has got all of it: it has got syntax highlighting, it has got projects, FTP, connectivity, remote – ah remote preview. “Has remote preview built right in. After making a change, view your changes remotely before ever committing your changes.” So, yeah, same thing again. Simplified workflow, site thumbnails, one touch publishing, available now. Except it’s not. Oh yes it is. It’s available on the app store, there you go. So yes, check out Gusto for both iPad, iPhone and iPod touch and sounds a lot better…

Marcus Lillington
New iPod touch, now that’s a Christmas present …

Paul Boag
Is that what you want?

Marcus Lillington
I don’t because I have got an iPhone but they’re so much nicer than the iPhone because they’re like this – they’re like a credit card.

Paul Boag
Wafer thin.

Marcus Lillington
Credit card – it’s a credit card’s thickness iPhone 5 without a telephone. But obviously you can do everything else …

Paul Boag
But I don’t believe it is credit card thickness.

Marcus Lillington
No, it’s not, I’m lying but it’s very thin.

Paul Boag
Yes.

Marcus Lillington
It’s very lovely.

Paul Boag
So there we go. That, I think, sounds like a really quite a good alternative to Diet Coda. Until Diet Coda sorts itself out, it has a prettier interface but, as we know Marcus from your own experience, looks aren’t everything.

Marcus Lillington
There is a retort there but it’s too cruel.

Paul Boag
Okay. Even that has made me want to go away and cry. Okay, Marcus, so what do you have joke-wise for us to wrap up this week?

Marcus Lillington
A woman walks into a bar and asked for a double entendre so the barman gives her one.

Paul Boag
I remember that one. You’re now into the realms of me remembering the jokes.

Marcus Lillington
See I didn’t remember that one…

Paul Boag
Oh right.

Marcus Lillington
…so that’s why I went for it.

Paul Boag
It’s funny but I do remember. I’m sorry.

Marcus Lillington
Never mind.

Paul Boag
Right. So there we go …

Marcus Lillington
We must have new audience and these …

Paul Boag
We must have a new audience, what you mean …

Marcus Lillington
Maybe one or two people.

Paul Boag
The people realize this show is shit and stop listening so we’re constantly relying on a turnover of new people, is that what you’re implying?

Marcus Lillington
I’m implying that to some people these jokes are new.

Paul Boag
Right.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah?

Paul Boag
Yes. You can’t use that forever. Eventually you’re going to shake that iPhone app and it’s just going to come up with a joke you’ve already done.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, I’ve run out.

Paul Boag
Yes.

Marcus Lillington
I did a new joke last week. People send me jokes: [email protected]

Paul Boag
Are you incapable of looking up your own jokes?

Marcus Lillington
No, I’m not incapable and I have done it in the past, but it’s one of those things that you just go no, don’t like that… oh, no that’s awful, I can’t say that on air, kind of thing.

Paul Boag
Right.

Marcus Lillington
So you just end up going, right, I don’t like any of them.

Paul Boag
Right.

Marcus Lillington
Whereas if people send you jokes they will send you one or two of their favorites.

Paul Boag
Yeah, I know what you mean. And also when you put – when you’ve got so many jokes available by searching online, you become hypercritical, don’t you?

Marcus Lillington
Exactly.

Paul Boag
Oh, that one is not funny enough, etc.

Marcus Lillington
Exactly.

Paul Boag
Of course, how we ever ended up doing this on the show is quite beyond me. I don’t know …

Marcus Lillington
I’m not going to go back and listen, but yeah how did it happen? …

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
… somebody tell me.

Paul Boag
And the trouble is we can’t stop now. It’s beyond our control, isn’t it? Because every time we try to we get hate mail.

Marcus Lillington
Indeed.

Paul Boag
So there we go, that wraps up the show for this week. Between now and next week people go over to boagworld.com/apps and make suggestions of what we include on the show. Also check out boagworld.com/questions because we’re posting stuff there. You really need to subscribe to the blog guys. It has loads of content than we will ever, ever cover on the show. We seem to be putting out a blog post every day at the moment. And occasionally some of it is actually good. We try and do – we’re doing a series at the moment, aren’t we, on web strategy and governance and those kinds of issues which is a really good series. The next one is going out, it doesn’t make any difference because this recording is not going out till next week.

Marcus Lillington
Correct.

Paul Boag
So we’ve got two out already. By the time you listen to this, there will be three out. So – and they’re really good, they’re long, detailed good content. Okay, I’ve pimped stuff enough. Oh, go to headscape.co.uk as well and check us out next week. Good bye.

Marcus Lillington
Bye.

Headscape

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