Bug herding, brackets and dealing with multimedia | Boagworld - Web & Digital Advice

Web & Digital Advice

Digital and web advice from Headscape and the addled brain of Paul Boag... tell me more

Paul Boag Posted by: Paul Boag On Thursday, 20th December, 2012

Bug herding, brackets and dealing with multimedia

On this week’s show. A tool for bug reporting, an amazing new code editor and a news feed app that gets better over time. We also look at a couple of services which will help with the multimedia on your site.

Season 4:
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Paul Boag
On this week’s show, we have a tool for bug reporting, an amazing new code editor and a newsfeed app that gets better over time. We also look at a couple of services that will help you with the multimedia on your website.

Paul Boag
So if I think about this, right, the podcast is a means of time travel.

Marcus Lillington
Okay. Yeah, it is, yes. It is actually – I’ve actually stopped work.

Paul Boag
Yeah, I know. This is what’s really quite exciting, that I’m not at work now and I won’t be at work again until after Christmas.

Marcus Lillington
I am off from the lunchtime of the 20th – Thursday the 20th, which I think is when this goes out.

Paul Boag
It is. I am off that whole day so I don’t know how the podcast is going to go out. In fact, I don’t even know how we’re recording it. We ought to go really. That’s it.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, okay. Well, Merry Christmas, Paul.

Paul Boag
Merry Christmas. I really enjoyed the show and we will do it again in the new year. So yeah, so that’s great. I am totally in holiday mode already. Is that really bad?

Marcus Lillington
It is really bad. But you saying to me earlier this morning that, oh, you don’t have to worry about that blog post because I have had to split my last one in two, it was like thank god for that!

Paul Boag
Not that I’ve written the second one yet but, yeah, it’s a…

Marcus Lillington
Well, it’s a sequence, Paul. There’s nothing I can do about it.

Paul Boag
No, you’re just stuck. You’re a – yes.

Marcus Lillington
Exactly. Yes, I would help but I can’t.

Paul Boag
Yeah. We’re doing a series on the Boagworld site about web governance which sounds so dull, doesn’t it? But it’s essentially about the – how you go about managing your website over the long-term and that kind of thing and how agencies like Headscape can come in and help you put together that web strategy. Wow! That sounds salesy (sic) but that’s essentially what it is and that’s what we’re doing and Marcus had to write one post about the whole thing and he’s making such a drama about it.

Marcus Lillington
No, no, it’s not a drama. I was thinking that it was just like I’ve actually only got like four days work, four working days before I break up for the end of term.

Paul Boag
Yeah, end of term.

Marcus Lillington
And it was like when I am going to fit that in? But I’ve started it and called it – it’s called “Taking Responsibility” and that’s what it’s all about.

Paul Boag
It is.

Marcus Lillington
So the whole thing is about taking responsibility.

Paul Boag
Yes, absolutely. Taking ownership of your own websites…

Marcus Lillington
Indeed.

Paul Boag
…and making good things happen for yourself rather than relying on people like us…

Marcus Lillington
Yes.

Paul Boag
…who are expensive.

Marcus Lillington
So this is fairly boring. So how’s your week been, Paul?

Paul Boag
Shut up. I knew you were going to do this. I knew it.

Marcus Lillington
I haven’t said a thing. I just said how’s your week been, Paul?

Paul Boag
No – it’s been great. Thank you very much.

Marcus Lillington
Marvelous.

Paul Boag
Let’s move on. There you go. That’s all that needs to be said.

Marcus Lillington
Okay.

Paul Boag
I had a lovely day – I had a lovely evening yesterday. I went down to the Blandford Christmas Fair.

Marcus Lillington
You didn’t sound too keen on that in your tweet that went out.

Paul Boag
Did I not? What did I say?

Marcus Lillington
It was like – oh, I’ve just noticed it’s the Blandford Christmas Fair, the highlight of our year.

Paul Boag
It is. You took that as sarcasm, that’s the truth!

Marcus Lillington
I have to say that Hartley Wintney where I live, our Christmas fair is the highlight of our year, too.

Paul Boag
Yeah, it was really…

Marcus Lillington
We have the best firework display you have ever seen in a little village.

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
It’s mind-blowingly good.

Paul Boag
Yeah, we have one as well. It’s good.

Marcus Lillington
People don’t – they’re like, yeah, yeah, okay, yeah. And then they come along and they’re like “oh yeah, right, okay”. It’s amazing. Gets people out I suppose.

Paul Boag
We didn’t have the best fire display last year. That was the year where it all fell over and shot into the crowd, got onto the news. This year was better. I am really pleased, mind, that they didn’t give in. You know what I mean? I could imagine them going “Oh, well, we better not do fireworks again.” But they have done it which is good, and nobody died which is nice.

Marcus Lillington
That’s particularly good.

Paul Boag
But most importantly, more important than the fact no one died, they have mulled cider.

Marcus Lillington
Mulled cider. Well of course they would in Dorset.

Paul Boag
I love that stuff. It’s great.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, our local…

Paul Boag
All the farmer’s markets and yeah.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah I imagine it was pretty good in Blandford.

Paul Boag
It was, yeah.

Marcus Lillington
Because we get like a few stalls that come every week. There is a weekly one, and it’s always a bit “hmm.”

Paul Boag
Oh, no, this…

Marcus Lillington
But a few good ones but basically you go down to the pub where they do mulled wines and obviously beer and you watch the fireworks.

Paul Boag
Right.

Marcus Lillington
And it’s freezing cold and it’s all a bit jolly.

Paul Boag
This is a little bit bigger than that. So it’s got – got the fireworks and the pub…

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
But it’s also got loads of farmer market stalls and also like lots of handcraft kind of goods and things like that.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, we bought a big wooden owl from my mate who does carving.

Paul Boag
Yeah, it’s that kind of – yeah, that kind of thing.

Marcus Lillington
For grandad. Oh I hope he’s not listening, supposed to be his Christmas present.

Paul Boag
Sshh. Oh he’s going to listen to a web design podcast! We have bell ringers and we have a little parade, all the kids walk through the town holding lanterns and things like that. Well I say lanterns it’s basically…

Marcus Lillington
Torches.

Paul Boag
No, no, it is milk cartons with things stuck on them with a little electric torch inside of them.

Marcus Lillington
Okay.

Paul Boag
It’s not very nice. Some of them do a good job.

Marcus Lillington
I think we should let them carry fire around.

Paul Boag
I do as well.

Marcus Lillington
It would look so much better.

Paul Boag
It would look lovely.

Marcus Lillington
The odd burned finger, but you know.

Paul Boag
Yeah, kids have got to harden up!

Marcus Lillington
Exactly.

Paul Boag
It’s like my son, talking of kids hardening up, I have never heard my son moan so much as he did yesterday – they did a talent show at school yesterday.

Marcus Lillington
Right.

Paul Boag
And he got roped into doing…

Marcus Lillington
Blandford’s Got Talent.

Paul Boag
Yeah, it’s that kind of awful thing. And he got kind of bounced into doing it by his mate and he really didn’t want to. So we got him out of it by saying as parents “we really think you should do this, James” just to help him really. And he did because he’s really into his science, he did the Coca-Mentos explosion thing, you’ve seen that?

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Paul Boag
So he did that, which isn’t really a talent but there you go.

Marcus Lillington
It’s relaying a bit of science, but yeah cool.

Paul Boag
It was great.

Marcus Lillington
Did he get a round of applause?

Paul Boag
He got massive – they loved it. And he got through to the next round and it was all very exciting, but did he moan! He had to carry back these two bottles of Coke afterwards. And he moaned and moaned, “I don’t want to walk home all by myself, why didn’t you think about this and come and pick me up?” Blooming whingey little git.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
Don’t have kids.

Marcus Lillington
Man up!

Paul Boag
Yeah, exactly.

Marcus Lillington
I have – I’ve got kids.

Paul Boag
No, I didn’t mean you. I mean the listeners.

Marcus Lillington
Okay.

Paul Boag
Well, I expect some of them have got kids.

Marcus Lillington
I would think so.

Paul Boag
But I have actually only got three people listening.

Marcus Lillington
I thought it was 300,000.

Paul Boag
Oh, is it? Yeah, one or the other. Somewhere between those two figures, probably.

Marcus Lillington
Yes. So Christmas, what are you going to do for Christmas, Paul? Or what are you going to do today? On your last day?

Paul Boag
On my last day, today, I will be putting a podcast live because that has to be a manual process even though I’m on a holiday which is a bit stinky.

Marcus Lillington
Chris – say thank you, Marcus.

Paul Boag
Thank you, Marcus, why?

Marcus Lillington
Chris is going to do a pitch on January the 3rd when you and I are on holiday.

Paul Boag
Right.

Marcus Lillington
And I have agreed to go with him.

Paul Boag
Thank you, Marcus.

Marcus Lillington
Thank you, Marcus.

Paul Boag
Yeah. Well then that’s his own stupid fault for arranging a pitch on the third.

Marcus Lillington
Wasn’t his fault, you know. They say this is the day it’s going to happen.

Paul Boag
Right.

Marcus Lillington
That’s the way it goes.

Paul Boag
That’s a stupid day to have a pitch.

Marcus Lillington
Well, it is actually just a normal working day. You and I both happened to have that week off.

Paul Boag
Not – not for normal people. Not for sensible people.

Marcus Lillington
So I don’t have what, 18 days off straight because I’ve got to do a pitch on Thursday, January the 3rd.

Paul Boag
I suppose a lot of companies don’t close down between Christmas and new year either, which we do.

Marcus Lillington
Quite a lot don’t – but quite a lot do. I mean most of our clients said, oh, we’re off next week. I can’t think of one that isn’t actually.

Paul Boag
Oh, good.

Marcus Lillington
So that’s kind of cool.

Paul Boag
Yeah, that’s brilliant. So are you playing Christmassy music behind this?

Marcus Lillington
Um, probably not.

Paul Boag
You’re going to put Christmas music at the end. I’ve got recommendation for…

Marcus Lillington
I’m not going to do any Christmas music, Paul.

Paul Boag
You’ve got to do some. I’ve just plugged in…

Marcus Lillington
You know the reason why I am not going to do it – alright.

Paul Boag
Make sure we’re turned up, go on. Carry on.

Marcus Lillington
Here we go. And the reason why I’m not going to do any Christmas music apart from what you’re going to do now…

Paul Boag
Right.

Marcus Lillington
…is…

Paul Boag
Because you are a grumpy bastard.

Marcus Lillington
No, it’s because I have to edit this and publish it in the next 10 minutes after we finish it pretty much.

Paul Boag
Right. Well, why can’t you just shove this song to the end if I give you the MP3 file?

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, yeah.

Paul Boag
Listen to this, right. This is Podsafe Christmas, right. Because it’s the idea you can’t play proper Christmas music because in theory it’s – well, not in theory, in practice it’s protected by the RAA or whatever the U.K. one is that you go on about that pay you cheques.

Marcus Lillington
PRS.

Paul Boag
Bastards.

Marcus Lillington
Performing Rights Society.

Paul Boag
Yeah, they don’t let you play music. But this one, they do. This is from Jonathan Coulton. You know the guy that does “Code Monkey” and those kinds of things?

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
So this is his…

[Music] (9:18 – 9:51)

Marcus Lillington
This is painful.

Paul Boag
You may take your headphones off.

Marcus Lillington
Make it stop!

Paul Boag
Okay. We’ll make people listen to that at the end.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, so they can turn it off at their leisure.

Paul Boag
I just think that’s so funny, that really made me feel Christmassy and happy.

Marcus Lillington
There is some – there are some – there’s quite a lot of music that you can use.

Paul Boag
Yeah I’m sure there is.

Marcus Lillington
So there’s the stuff under Creative Commons, and that’s not more than – like I think it’s more than 50 years after the death of the composer anyone can use it.

Paul Boag
Right.

Marcus Lillington
All that kind of stuff.

Paul Boag
So you mean your grandchildren won’t be making, or your great grandchildren won’t be making money out of you.

Marcus Lillington
No.

Paul Boag
That sucks.

Marcus Lillington
It doesn’t suck. It’s good that it comes back to the general use. But equally it’s good that your estate kind of earn from you if you are – I don’t know – Jimi Hendrix or somebody.

Paul Boag
Of course the exception to this is if you are Disney. If you are Walt Disney, he manages to keep hold of his rights to all of his stuff way beyond 50 years after his death.

Marcus Lillington
I don’t know how film works, I have no idea, I only know about music, so.

Paul Boag
There you go. Alright, shall we do something web design related?

Marcus Lillington
Alright then.

Paul Boag
Okay, so we’ve got four apps as we always have, obviously, because this is the last in our app series, when we return in January.

Marcus Lillington
This better be good, Paul.

Paul Boag
No, no, no, I was about to say, obviously we’re scraping the barrel.

Marcus Lillington
Alright, yeah, we’ve run out of good ones.

Paul Boag
Actually that’s not true.

Marcus Lillington
Aren’t there millions of apps?

Paul Boag
There are millions of apps and these ones are great, actually. I’m lying.

Marcus Lillington
Tell me what this one is, Paul, because I don’t know…

BugHerd

BugHerd helps web developers get detailed feedback from their users and clients.

Paul Boag
Right, the first one, you’re going to bugherd.com.

Marcus Lillington
BugHerd.

Paul Boag
Which I think just for the URL and name, it should be on the show. For some reason I love the idea of herding bugs.

Marcus Lillington
Something just went ping, is that you, Paul, I’m going to turn you off.

Paul Boag
Oh, yeah, sorry.

Marcus Lillington
You are off now.

Paul Boag
I’ve muted me at this end just to make doubly sure. Yeah, so essentially what this is, is a really, really simple bug tracker, right, and this is something we’ve always been going on about isn’t it? Headscape I mean.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, yeah.

Paul Boag
So how do we track bugs, what’s the best way of doing it? And we have horrible things like JIRA the track bugs and there’s all kinds of different ways of doing it. I like this way very much.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, you’ll never get it in though.

Paul Boag
No, no.

Marcus Lillington
I’ve used JIRA and it’s alright actually.

Paul Boag
Well I’m not – they’ll do what they want, I’m beyond caring. I don’t do production work. If they want to…

Marcus Lillington
But if you actually get involved in a project – so I remember, I think it was Pete who went away for about three weeks back to South Africa, so it was like “oh, shit”, I’ve got to use JIRA. And I kind of like thought actually this makes sense because it’s when you open it up and there is nothing in it, it’s like “I don’t understand this, it’s really complex”, but if you – if there is a real project that you understand the project and who is doing what then it makes sense and it actually is alright. It’s just not very pretty.

Paul Boag
So are we going to have to put a link in the show notes to JIRA?

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, made by Atlassian.

Paul Boag
Recommended by Marcus Lillington.

Marcus Lillington
That’s a bit strong. It does what it does well, it could look a lot nicer.

Paul Boag
It could. I like this because it’s a visual tool which obviously is going to appeal to me. Let’s kind of just explain what it is, first of all. So essentially, yes, is a very simple bug tracker but it works in quite an interesting way. So you’ve got a development site up and running on your server, right, and you add in a little bit of JavaScript into that site and basically the client can come along, or anybody can come along and they can select a little bit of copy or an image or any other screen element and they can say “that should be bigger or this should be moved to the left or make my logo bigger”, you know that kind of stuff. And they can basically put notes over the top of it and navigate around the site and identify all of the problems on the site that way. So it’s very much designer orientated, I think. It’s not really – I wouldn’t say the most appropriate tool. I mean I haven’t obviously used this hands-on but not the most appropriate tool for developers.

Marcus Lillington
It’s not really a bug tracker at all.

Paul Boag
It is.

Marcus Lillington
It’s a feedback mechanism thingy, bit like get feedback.

Paul Boag
Yeah, so I guess it’s more like that. It’s got an element of that. But you can go into the back end and get a traditional list of, kind of, to do’s, doing, you know…

Marcus Lillington
Okay, fair enough.

Paul Boag
…stuff like that. But in terms of an easy way for clients to identify and feedback on elements of a design, it’s brilliant. And then behind the scenes you’ve got kind of – you can see an entire project at a single glance and you’ve got task lists and those could be dragged and associated with different people. So all of that kind of stuff and it also integrates into things like base camp, and loads of other bits and bobs.

But what I think is really great, is you are seeing exactly what the client sees. The client often comes back with – “can you change text on the page called so and so?” and they haven’t named the page right and you struggle to find it and this kind of deals with all that kind of stuff. And they go “oh, oh that button, can we move it slightly to the right by a few pixels?” It’s all that kind of stuff. So it’s as much a collaboration tool as a bug tracking tool and I like that, I like it a lot. It’s really quite interesting.

Let’s go and have a look at the list of features, see if there is anything else major that I’ve missed. Yeah, so it’ll also – and this is really useful actually, this is an important one – is if they are reporting a bug, you know “oh, oh the text looks a bit wonky in my browser”, right?

Marcus Lillington
Right.

Paul Boag
You get things like that and…

Marcus Lillington
Stop using IE.

Paul Boag
Yeah, you have to say, “okay, so what version of – what browser are you using?” “I am using IE”. “Are you using it on a Mac or on a PC?” “Oh, I don’t know, I am using it on a PC”. “Okay, what version of Windows are you running?” “Oh I have no idea”. “What version of IE?” And you have to go, “Okay, go to the file and then select about.” Well, when they submit a bug on this, it puts the original URL in, it puts the operating system in, it puts the browser in, it even tells you what resolution their computer is and what size their browser window is at. So you really get a load of additional information alongside it, which I just think is great. Obviously it’s got all the other stuff that you’d expect; you can invite unlimited guests in to use it, you got email notifications, you can tag stuff if you want to for different people. And changes that you make are updated in real-time so there is no need to reload the page and you can work very collaboratively together and you can obviously put in things like file attachments and all that kind of good stuff as well. So really quite impressive.

Marcus Lillington
I had a – well it wasn’t a blue screen, it was grey screen of death yesterday.

Paul Boag
What on a Mac?

Marcus Lillington
On my Mac. First time ever, just working away, da da da da, boof!

Paul Boag
Yeah, it does do it sometimes but it’s quite unusual. That’s quite…

Marcus Lillington
Fortunately it all came back.

Paul Boag
Yeah, well that’s the good thing about Mac these days is it’s got this auto-resume – it just comes back exactly as it was. All the same applications open with the same files in the same place.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah I’ve never seen anything like that before.

Paul Boag
What made you suddenly think of that?

Marcus Lillington
Talking about Macs and PCs.

Paul Boag
Okay. And you just felt that you needed to tell me that.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, otherwise I would have just forgotten and it was so important.

Paul Boag
Right, fair enough. So you could get one member for free on this with unlimited projects and unlimited guests. If you’ve got a team of five people then it’s $29 per month. If you’ve got a team of 10 people, $49. And if you’ve got a team of 25 people, it’s $99 per month. If you’ve got a team bigger than that then obviously you are not allowed to use that project. So there you go. Check it out at bugherd.com.

Adobe Brackets

Although currently still in Alpha, Adobe Brackets is shaping up to be a superb code editor including some innovative new features.

Paul Boag
I’ve got to say I like the way that Adobe are doing things these days.

Marcus Lillington
Really?

Paul Boag
Yes, I do, I’ve got a lot of time for Adobe.

Marcus Lillington
There’s not a lot of love for Adobe in the world.

Paul Boag
Well, yeah.

Marcus Lillington
Although everyone uses their stuff, so there’s got to be some love. They moan about how expensive it is basically don’t they?

Paul Boag
Yeah, they do and that is a problem. Although that’s getting better, I really think they’re really pushing hard this iCloud feature that they are offering, and they are pushing out stuff relatively regularly to iCloud so I really think that’s the way things will go. And it will be like a subscription cost which I do think is a better way of doing things because you are spreading the costs out and it’s not – it means that people sign out, don’t have this bigger cost upfront and yeah all that kind of stuff. So – but that’s not what I am talking about, what I am talking about – I am really impressed that they have almost turned on a dime, right, that one of their major products was Flash, okay.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
And suddenly there were all these problems with Flash, there were all kinds of reasons why we shouldn’t be using Flash anymore and they really have adapted very, very well and are pushing out into the community loads of great little new innovative tools, including things like Reflow that’s been renamed Edge now for testing across multiple devices. They’ve got this…

Marcus Lillington
That’s cool.

Paul Boag
No I didn’t mean Reflow. It was called Shadow and it’s now called Edge. And then there is the Reflow product as well, which is the design tool, a bit like Photoshop that we’ve covered. All these kinds of things that they’re pushing out there that are really good. And there is another one that I discovered only yesterday, that I am really loving. And what’s really cool about this is it’s an open-source project, right. So, I don’t know – and basically you can download all the code for it and dig around in it. The actual thing is built in HTML, CSS and JavaScript. So you could really see how it works and you go with it. Whether they’re going to bundle it up as a paid product eventually, I presume they are going to, but it certainly looks very, very interesting and it’s definitely worth checking out, it’s called Adobe Brackets. At the moment, it’s just up on GitHub, because it’s essentially – it’s still being developed, so therefore they’ve kind of opened it up to everybody. But they also have a YouTube channel. Let me see if I can find that. YouTube, Adobe Brackets.

Marcus Lillington
Found it.

Paul Boag
Yes, there you go. So it’s on YouTube as well. We’ll include a link to the kind of introduction in the show notes. And it’s just – they’ve really rethought a coding environment brilliantly. So, for example, one of the big things, right, you’re an editor, you’ve got your HTML code up in front of you, you’re looking at the – I don’t know – the container div. Right? And the container div is being a pain in the arse for whatever reason; it’s not displaying content as it should be. Right? You’ve got your browser open, no it’s not looking right, okay, so I need to edit this. Right?

So you’ve got your HTML, you’ve found your container, but actually it’s not a problem with the HTML, it’s problem with the CSS. So you open up CSS, and now you have to go through the CSS and find all of the different elements in the CSS that relate to that particular element – all the rules that relate to that element. Well, what Brackets will allow you to do is pull up the HTML, select the container div, hit a keyboard command and it will expand down all of the CSS from any file across your whole system that all the CSS that relate to that particular element. It is such a timesaver. It’s just a genius, genius idea. Really useful way of kind of quickly getting to the piece of code that you need. And the trouble is, CSS is – I don’t know – the way we build websites, it’s getting more and more complicated and we are having stuff spread in more and more different places and this is just a brilliant, brilliant idea as a way to deal with it.

It also does alongside that, things like live preview, which is really slick. So you make a change to your CSS and your websites automatically updating and it all looks cool and wonderful and great. It’s still very much in alpha, right, so it doesn’t support LESS – it’s got all kinds of limitations, I won’t even begin to go through. But what I am loving about this is, A, the features that they are producing in it, which are great; B, the fact that they are open-sourcing it; and, C, the fact that even though it’s a completely rickety alpha, it’s out there. And that’s what they are doing with all of their stuff these days, is they are putting stuff out there so that the web development community can feedback on it and really have an impact on the way it’s being developed and the way it’s going. And we can play with it right now. I am quite happy to have it and can play with some half-baked software. I just think that’s brilliant, I am really excited by it.

Marcus Lillington
I am being a bit dim here, but I thought an alpha was the final version?

Paul Boag
No. Alpha is the – the really basic version. Beta is – we’re kind of getting there in it’s reasonable shape and then it’s a gold master.

Marcus Lillington
Okay, fine.

Paul Boag
I don’t know why it is. Or a release candidate is the other – the way they word it.

Marcus Lillington
So what do other people think of this?

Paul Boag
I have…

Marcus Lillington
What does Dan think?

Paul Boag
I don’t know. I haven’t talked to Dan about it. Literally I only found out about this yesterday.

Marcus Lillington
Oh blimey, right.

Paul Boag
So yesterday evening sitting in bed, I changed the show to include it, because I was quite excited by it. Check out the video that will be in the show notes and then let us know what you think in the comments, because I’d be really interested to see what you think. See what you think of kind of Adobe’s new way of approaching things. Are you as enthusiastic as me or are you bitter and cynical and presume that it’s some manipulative ploy?

Marcus Lillington
That’s why I asked the question.

Paul Boag
Yeah. I mean it might be. It might well be. It might be – well, of course, it is. Of course they are doing it because they want to get the web design community on board with them, they want to get free feedback on their products that improve them.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah. And when they integrate it with their source or whatever, then you’ll have to pay for it.

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
And fair, fine, I am okay with that. They are a business. They’ve got to make money.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
Hopefully they’ll not charge like silly money for it, but they probably will. And then we will be all pushed to use our iCloud where they can extract money from us every month, for the rest of our natural born lives.

Marcus Lillington
Exactly.

Paul Boag
But, unfortunately that’s kind of what we’ve had to do anyways. Web design is you have to keep upgrading your software. And at £300 a touch or whatever it is, actually I don’t mind paying a fee every month; it’s more effective I think.

Marcus Lillington
It’s a weird one, isn’t it?

Paul Boag
Chris would disagree with me because he only likes to buy software every 10 years.

Marcus Lillington
But, yeah, I mean – do you need to follow every single upgrade? Probably not. So if you upgrade it every two years…

Paul Boag
It depends on…

Marcus Lillington
…say, would it actually be cheaper to do it that way? I don’t know.

Paul Boag
Well, the trouble is your not just using one of their tools.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
You’re using a lot of their tools. Then something new comes along, like Brackets. Okay? So hang on a minute, there is no upgrade path for that because it hasn’t existed before so I’ve got to buy an entirely new license or what is obviously a really good product.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, exactly. Yeah.

Paul Boag
But I get it for free, because I was already paying for Photoshop, so it kind of works itself out I think. And there are a lot of programs like for example Adobe Illustrator, I don’t use regularly, but I do use it once in a blue moon. So what is it with that…

Marcus Lillington
A reversing builder’s lorry.

Paul Boag
That’s because they do building opposite, that’s fair enough. We’ll let them. I often wonder whether you can actually hear this on the podcast.

Marcus Lillington
You can.

Paul Boag
You can. Okay. Yeah, so I actually think – so Adobe Illustrator, I’ll use once in a blue moon. Or if I want to very, very rarely – but occasionally I want to edit video. So the great thing about iCloud – and there is no way I am going to buy license for that. So what am I going to do?

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Paul Boag
What did I used to do? I went out and pirated it. Well, this way…

Marcus Lillington
iMovie.

Paul Boag
Yeah. Well, this way I’ve got it built-in as part of one-off fee. I just think it’s a really good idea. But there you go, that’s just me. So, anyway, check out Adobe Brackets, watch the video, let us know what you think of it, maybe even download and have a little play. They are actually saying, if you want to, you can build a feature in it. That’s why it’s open-source and you can download the code if you are so inclined. I obviously, I am not inclined because it would take talent and skill that I am lacking. But nonetheless, you may want to have a go, so check out.

Alright, so we’re going to do things a little bit differently today, I am going to go for the mobile app next.

Marcus Lillington
Okay.

Paul Boag
For no other reason than it was the next tab in my browser.

Marcus Lillington
14th episode and last episode, you suddenly changed the format.

Paul Boag
I know. Well, that’s the kind of guy I am. I’m just so rock and roll.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, I know.

Paul Boag
After we finish this, I am going to throw your mixing desk through the window.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, right. I’d actually love to see you try.

Paul Boag
Yeah, it’ll be quite difficult. They are very small panes of glass. They are double-glazed. And the mixing desk is not that large.

Marcus Lillington
No.

Paul Boag
So it probably isn’t going go through, is it?

Marcus Lillington
No.

Paul Boag
Okay. I consider this a challenge, I will accept gladly.

Zite

Zite Homepage

Zite is an iPhone and iPad magazine, much in the style of Flipboard. The one advantage over Flipboard is that it learns about your tastes over time and adapts the content accordingly.

Paul Boag
Right. So, our mobile app for the week – so everybody’s heard of Flipboard app?

Marcus Lillington
Yes. Even I have.

Paul Boag
This is a little bit similar, but in some ways better. It’s called Zite. Z.I.T.E. Zite.com

Marcus Lillington
Paul, Paul, Paul. Paul.

Paul Boag
What?

Marcus Lillington
What nationality are you?

Paul Boag
What should I – Z…oh dear. I do spend too much time around Americans. That is shameful. It is

Marcus Lillington
It’s shameful.

Paul Boag
I am quite.

Marcus Lillington
Z.I.T.E.

Paul Boag
Z.I.T.E.

Marcus Lillington
Right. And yes, pretty pictures.

Paul Boag
It’s got a little owl.

Marcus Lillington
An owl. Yeah cool.

Paul Boag
So which immediately makes me think of HootSuite. But, no, it’s good. What it is?

Marcus Lillington
It’s got pictures of food on it, I quite like that.

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
It always works for me.

Paul Boag
So it’s an iPad app, and it’s an iPhone app. It’s Flipboard but less pretty. So so far a bad thing. It’s still quite pretty, I have to say. Recently, I hadn’t recommended it before because it was so damn ugly before but recently they’ve done an upgrade and now it is really quite attractive. It’s quite user-friendly to play with. So, it’s a lot better. But it’s not as nice as Flipboard, it has to be said. But here is the killer feature, it learns from you.

Marcus Lillington
Is it an artificial intelligence, Paul?

Paul Boag
No. But it has – it’s not a mind from the culture, let’s put it like that. But it’s heading in the right direction. So essentially what it does is, you can say, oh I liked that post thumbs up to that post, or that was a shit post, I never want to see anything like that, again thumbs down.

Marcus Lillington
Yes.

Paul Boag
And it kind of updates as you – it goes along. You can go in there and you can search on different subject matter and it will find the best from the web on that subject. But then you can refine it and it learns and it gets better and better over time as to what you like. So I’ve got all kinds of different subjects from science fiction to iOS apps to web design, I felt like obliged to have that in there.

Marcus Lillington
Boring.

Paul Boag
I know. To psychology, to productivity, all kinds of things I selected. Football obviously – yeah, all that kind of stuff.

Marcus Lillington
Oh, I wonder what the score on the cricket is?

Paul Boag
Nobody cares. So…

Marcus Lillington
I do.

Paul Boag
So it kind of learns as you go along. Another reason for, I haven’t got a huge amount to say on this app. I’ll say – it’s worth saying that it’s not just available for the iPhone and iPad, it’s also available for Android and Windows 7 devices as well. It’s free, which is obviously a huge thing, which probably means it will go away before long because they’ll not make any money out of it. But it’s been around for a while, so it’s doing well. The other thing I wanted to say about it, as kind of an aside really, it’s a really useful app in its own right. It’s quite interesting how careful you have to be. So when they did this redesign…

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
…they added in a load of gestures. Right? Gestures are the in thing, aren’t they, with iOS design.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah. You use three fingers from one hand and slide that one that way…

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
…and then it will do something amazing.

Paul Boag
Yeah, absolutely, yeah.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah. I am going to download this, it sounds good.

Paul Boag
I don’t know why – you have to be so careful with gestures. Right?

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
Yes. How many fingers you use, in what gesture. You want gestures to be accidentally discoverable. Right? Like for the first time you accidentally discovered that you could pull to refresh. Right? Do you remember that?

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
And it’s very obscure. But you found it and or someone told you about it, and then that it was the most natural thing in the world. Right?

Marcus Lillington
Yes.

Paul Boag
I’ve tried to do the same thing but I’ve got it just slightly wrong.

Marcus Lillington
Okay.

Paul Boag
So, you’ve got all these different tabs, mainly on the kind of iPad version, this is more appropriate for, these different kind of – not tabs, blocks of content. Right? Different stories, all on the page at the same time.

Marcus Lillington
Whereas on the iPhone it’s only one.

Paul Boag
Yeah, yeah. And you can press on one you can go through to the detail of the story. And you can also flip left and right to kind of go between pages like you do on Flipboard. Right?

Marcus Lillington
Yes.

Paul Boag
But, they’ve added this extra feature in, right, that if you flip it down one of the panels – if you flip one of the panels down, it says, it’s a thumbs up, it’s saying I like this post and you can keep it. If you flip the panel up, right, then you will say I don’t like this post.

Marcus Lillington
And it misinterprets your left and rights for your ups and downs.

Paul Boag
There is the problem.

Marcus Lillington
Oh dear. It’s a very – am I at a right angle?

Paul Boag
Yes. And it’s very easy to accidentally trigger it.

Marcus Lillington
Right.

Paul Boag
And it’s just an example of where somebody has not quite got it.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
Where it hasn’t quite worked. You compare that to say the new Flickr app, by the way, awesome job at that. I’ve now basically dumped Instagram and I am going back to Flickr, it’s such a gorgeous app, it really is lovely, lovely done. And one of the things that they’ve done is, you can favorite stuff, which is equivalent of the thumbs up, basically.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, yeah.

Paul Boag
And all you do is just double tap on an image and it does it. And there is enough differentiation between the double tap and the single tap for it to work flawlessly every time. Those kinds of details are so important to get right.

Marcus Lillington
What if you got a bit of a shaky hand?

Paul Boag
I don’t know.

Marcus Lillington
Because therefore it’s not flawless.

Paul Boag
Or what if you’re dead? You can’t use it if you are dead.

Marcus Lillington
There is a bit of difference between having a shaky hand and being dead.

Paul Boag
I bet you it works. I bet you it’s fine with a shaky hand. So…

Marcus Lillington
It sounds – I’ve actually downloaded it, it sounds that good.

Paul Boag
It is really good. It is really good. And it doesn’t – you don’t have to just put web design news in there, although, Marcus, I would encourage you to do that.

Marcus Lillington
Yes, alright, I will.

Paul Boag
But you can also put other stuff in there as well.

Marcus Lillington
Well, I can say this that my wife definitely will not be listening to this podcast; I bought her a new iPad for Christmas.

Paul Boag
Oh brilliant, absolutely brilliant – a new iPad.

Marcus Lillington
No, but I’ll get her old one.

Paul Boag
Oh great.

Marcus Lillington
So I will finally have an iPad just knocking around.

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
So this will be my ready thing.

Paul Boag
Yeah, it will be a good ready thing on the iPad.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
I mean I still have Flipboard as well, it is different, it’s quite cool because Flipboard you very much control what is displayed to you.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
You can go in and say, I want this website or I want this website or whatever to be – these things for my timeline to appear. Zite is more of a discovery tool. It’s like you put in a subject…

Marcus Lillington
It’s category based, isn’t it?

Paul Boag
Yes. And I…

Marcus Lillington
Yeah. Which is why it’s really appealing.

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
There is about four things I am interested in. That’s it; my whole life. So that will be quite easy to kind of cover that…

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
…and it – because if you had, I don’t know, 20 categories, you get too much.

Paul Boag
Yeah, I’ve got too many categories…

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
…I need to cut down my number of categories.

Marcus Lillington
But if you pick five…

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
… I reckon on an iPad, probably not on your phone…

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
…and then you’re going to be able to get a lovely summary of…

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
…stuff.

Paul Boag
You can’t go in – I mean it gives you top stories as you can see from its website, which is like a mixture of all of your categories, but you can go into any individual category as well and kind of pull up information on that. So it’s really nice. Check it out. I think it’s the closest thing – that’s really embarrassing, I was just about to say exactly the same thing that’s written on their website. That’s so weird. It’s got a quote from Bob somebody or other.

Marcus Lillington
Bob.

Paul Boag
Who says, this app is the closest thing to the perfect magazine. And I was going to say, it feels like a magazine.

Marcus Lillington
It’s better than that though, because I can’t go and buy a magazine on guitars, cricket and web design.

Paul Boag
No, no. Oh yeah, it’s better than…

Marcus Lillington
I’ll get it all in one.

Paul Boag
Sure, absolutely.

Marcus Lillington
Fantastic.

Paul Boag
Right. There we go. That’s my mobile app pick of the week. So this last…

Pods in Print and Voices.com

Screenshot of Voices.com

Services like Pods in Print and Voices.com make it easy to produce professional multimedia while still ensuring it is search engine friendly and available to the largest audience.

Marcus Lillington
That was really good.

Paul Boag
You liked that one?

Marcus Lillington
So why did you do it? Why did you move it to third place, when it would have been a great thing to finish on?

Paul Boag
Because I want to kind of – yeah, I don’t know. I don’t know, it just felt like the right thing to do.

Marcus Lillington
Okay.

Paul Boag
It’s because this last one is a bit messy. It’s messy for a couple of reasons.

Marcus Lillington
Messy?

Paul Boag
Yeah. It’s messy because it’s two things and not one.

Marcus Lillington
Right.

Paul Boag
Right? So that’s confusing.

Marcus Lillington
Yes.

Paul Boag
It’s messy because it’s not really an app, it’s a service.

Marcus Lillington
Right.

Paul Boag
So that’s confusing and not part of the format. And third, one of the services is a service that we use and we get a discount on because we’re promoting it. And so I had mixed feelings about even including it at all.

Marcus Lillington
But if we rate something, it’s perfectly okay to do that.

Paul Boag
Yeah. It is damn good. I ummed and ahed on it and in the end I sat there thinking, so I really want to include this on the show but I am thinking I am not going to because they give us money off. That seems ridiculous to me. So anyway, caveats in place.

Marcus Lillington
Yes.

Paul Boag
So I’ve got thinking about this whole area of the amount of media that we are now including on our websites. So there was a…

Marcus Lillington
Interesting. I’ve been doing a review. I am in a middle of a review.

Paul Boag
Okay.

Marcus Lillington
And I have decided, in my wisdom…

Paul Boag
In your wisdom

Marcus Lillington
…that basically the social media links and their blog and that kind of thing are all going to take much, much greater prominence on every single page of the site…

Paul Boag
Yes.

Marcus Lillington
…from now on. And they are fairly prominent at the moment…

Paul Boag
Right.

Marcus Lillington
…but it needs to be upped from what it is now, because if you go through and look at their Facebook page for example, it’s more interesting than the website by a mile.

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
And more up-to-date and…

Paul Boag
And it’s got things like video and audio and all of that kind of stuff.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah. And regularly posted video. The site’s got all of that but it’s kind of just very – kind of – this is our magazine.

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
And, yeah, the Facebook page is better frankly.

Paul Boag
Absolutely. And I mean increasingly you go to websites these days, in fact we’ve even done it today where on the home page there is a video introduction that kind of gives you an overview of the product in one easy go. Right?

Marcus Lillington
Yes.

Paul Boag
So there are lots of ways of using it, it’s not just blog posts, it’s not even just podcasts, it can be promotional material kinds of stuff. So there are a couple of services out there that are kind of appealing to me in doing this. Right? The first one, which I came across because somebody on Twitter – I am really sorry, if it was you that said this to me.

Marcus Lillington
It wasn’t me.

Paul Boag
No, no, I am talking to the three listeners now. It’s gone up actually. I am sure it was only two originally, and we’ve added another one.

Marcus Lillington
Okay.

Paul Boag
We’re becoming more popular. Or perhaps it was six and we’ve gone down.

Marcus Lillington
It’s gone to seven, seven whole listeners.

Paul Boag
Right. We’ve got…

Marcus Lillington
700,000.

Paul Boag
700,000 listeners.

Marcus Lillington
That sounds like such a big number.

Paul Boag
It’s really not that big. No, sorry, 700,000 is – our number of listeners isn’t as big as everybody thinks.

Marcus Lillington
Okay.

Paul Boag
I am not going to tell them how many it is.

Marcus Lillington
It’s more than seven.

Paul Boag
It’s more than seven but less than 700,000.

Marcus Lillington
Okay.

Paul Boag
So what was I saying, I completely forgotten. No, it’s gone. Alright, so there is just – I don’t know how we got there, but anyway, so one of the problems is with these videos, you listen some of them and you go, okay that’s the developer there, sitting there waffling about his app…

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
…quite poorly.

Marcus Lillington
Yes.

Paul Boag
So there is a need to make these things professional if you’re going to do them.

Marcus Lillington
Apps, well, yes and no.

Paul Boag
In some situation – not in the blogs.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, yeah.

Paul Boag
Like you were talking and that’s fine, absolutely.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
But if it’s one of the, kind of, here is our new app.

Marcus Lillington
If isn’t – yeah, we want to sell you a new product then, yeah, people expect, that they will associate the professionalism of the video with the professionalism of the delivered product.

Paul Boag
Absolutely.

Marcus Lillington
Absolutely.

Paul Boag
So what you need then is a professional voiceover artist.

Marcus Lillington
Yes.

Paul Boag
Now, we’ve hired those before.

Marcus Lillington
Many times.

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
I have my favorites.

Paul Boag
And you have your favorites, and where did you go – tell me, what we do because you always arrange it and I actually don’t know what we do.

Marcus Lillington
Basically I used to go through a website I think was called Voice Brokers.

Paul Boag
Right, okay.

Marcus Lillington
And I hired two or three different voiceover artists through them and they were all great. But I basically got an email from a local voice artist called Mel Hampshire.

Paul Boag
Okay. Link to the show notes. Have we got a link for him?

Marcus Lillington
Her.

Paul Boag
Her? Sorry.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah. And to be honest, I think it was just – she was basically just spamming businesses luckily…

Paul Boag
Right.

Marcus Lillington
…and I checked out her site or listened to the thing that was attached to the email and I thought, yeah, you are really good.

Paul Boag
Cool.

Marcus Lillington
And used her two or three times since.

Paul Boag
Oh brilliant.

Marcus Lillington
So I tend to just go back to her and unless I had to have an American voice.

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
But she is really good, does lots of different voices, so.

Paul Boag
Great. But not, everybody obviously…

Marcus Lillington
And this is once a year.

Paul Boag
Yeah, yeah. We don’t do it that much. No. But occasionally, and I think we will be doing more of that kind of stuff, I would like to see us doing more of it. I look at some of our clients and think they could dearly do with a video on their home page, explaining what the hell they do.

Marcus Lillington
One thing – one thing that’s really important when it comes to voiceover artists is, I’ve got a nice radio voice, so have you, Paul.

Paul Boag
I so don’t.

Marcus Lillington
But I am just – we do this every…

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
…where people listen to us, so we think oh yes, I can talk a bit okay.

Paul Boag
No, not

Marcus Lillington
We’re crap in comparison to proper professional voice over artist.

Paul Boag
It’s unbelievable, isn’t it?

Marcus Lillington
They are amazing. I’ve tried it in the past. I’ve tried to do voiceovers for…

Paul Boag
It sounds awful.

Marcus Lillington
…sales stuff we’ve done and it’s like, hello, my name is Marcus…

Paul Boag
Yes.

Marcus Lillington
…and I’m really monotone. And then you hire them and it just comes to life.

Paul Boag
I know.

Marcus Lillington
It’s fantastic.

Paul Boag
Absolutely.

Marcus Lillington
What they charge – which is normally not very much.

Paul Boag
No. It’s worth every penny.

Marcus Lillington
It’s massively valuable.

Paul Boag
Yeah, I know, I agree. So if you’re looking for a source of voiceover artists, if you want to hear a lot of voiceover artists, hear a little bit of their work, then literally really simple – we probably make it – not more complicated, but I don’t know how you do it with this lady but essentially send off the script and then they come back to it, do they record – does she record it herself or do you meet up with her or…

Marcus Lillington
She records it herself.

Paul Boag
Right. Well that’s essentially what this website does is, voices.com, and you can find…

Marcus Lillington
She’s probably on it.

Paul Boag
I expect so. What’s her name?

Marcus Lillington
Mel Hampshire.

Paul Boag
You have a look.

Marcus Lillington
I’ll have a look. Yeah.

Paul Boag
So voices.com, it’s got basically loads of different people, you can just have a listen to some of them to see what they’re like, find one that you’re after and then it’s as simple as that. You can post a job if you want to or you can just search for talent. You can look at the top 100, you can browse their directory, there’s all kinds of stuff. It’s interesting. Just have a look at the directory, how it’s organized. That’s interesting, it’s organized…

Marcus Lillington
No, she is not in there.

Paul Boag
She needs to get on there.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
It’s organized; television, radio, business, telephone, podcasting, Internet, so there is different kind of areas of expertise that people have got. So let’s have a look at, I want business people. There’s even cartoons. No, I am sorry I am doing cartoons now. Turn up the, turn me up, Marcus.

Marcus Lillington
Hang on.

Paul Boag
Because we’ve got to play in some of these. Okay, here we go. This is Michael Morgan. Ready? [Audio] What’s he sound like, I can’t hear him?

Marcus Lillington
He’s alright.

Paul Boag
You don’t like him much then?

Marcus Lillington
No. I’ve heard better.

Paul Boag
Well let’s use their featured ones. Here we go. Here is the featured ones off the home page. I am going to go for this guy, because he’s called Jared Zeus.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
So he’s got to be cool. [Audio]

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, he’s got a good voice.

Paul Boag
You like him?

Marcus Lillington
Yeah. Let’s do a clear and kind of quite high pitched, very good.

Paul Boag
Let’s do Rachel Hurley. You’re much pickier than me. [Audio]

Marcus Lillington
She sounds like… the weird thing is you’ve –

Paul Boag
That’s – I’ve heard her.

Marcus Lillington
Yes, you recognize their voices because they do so much…

Paul Boag
I know where I’ve heard her as well because I recognize the music in the background, that’s a British gas ad.

Marcus Lillington
It’s not, it’s Homebase, I think it said.

Paul Boag
Was it?

Marcus Lillington
Play it again. [Audio] Great voice. Vodafone, she’s on now.

Paul Boag
Vodafone, right.

Marcus Lillington
But the first one was Homebase, yeah.

Paul Boag
Yeah.

Marcus Lillington
Wonderful voice.

Paul Boag
That’s – you see that’s pretty isn’t it? So what an easy way to find voiceover artists. And like you said, they are not that expensive, they really are – it’s worth it.

Marcus Lillington
I imagine famous actors would be – but…

Paul Boag
Sure. But then these are not famous actors, are they? They are just voiceover artists, and what is does, it doesn’t talk about prices, payment terms.

Marcus Lillington
I suspect it’s different for each artist.

Paul Boag
Yeah. And you pay via the website, so it’s very nice and easy. Send payments via Visa, MasterCard or PayPal, and then download your files from the website. How simple is that? Very nice indeed. So, that’s voices.com. So there is kind of half the equation. Right?

Marcus Lillington
Right.

Paul Boag
You’ve got your great voiceover now and maybe you’ve produced your video, really we should have talked about how to get animators…

Marcus Lillington
Yes.

Paul Boag
…videos and stuff like that. But you just want to hire Headscape if you want to do that because our guys would love to do more of that.

Marcus Lillington
They would certainly yes.

Paul Boag
So, that’s that dealt with. So you’ve come to Headscape, right?

Marcus Lillington
Yes.

Paul Boag
You’ve picked your voiceover artist; you’ve got your incredible video, what now? Right?

Marcus Lillington
Right.

Paul Boag
The problem is with these videos is that they are not accessible, not only to people that are deaf, but also they are not spiderable. Okay?

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
It’s like this podcast, it’s not – not spiderable, there is all that amazing content and wisdom that we share with the world, week in, week out, this incredible advice that is life changing but it never appears on Google. Right?

Marcus Lillington
Yes.

Paul Boag
So…

Marcus Lillington
Which is actually – yeah, you are right, I mean it’s so important. We’re going to have more and more and more and more and more video content.

Paul Boag
Exactly.

Marcus Lillington
And it needs to be searchable.

Paul Boag
Yeah, it’s going to need to be searchable. So there is a real need to provide transcripts now. It always used to be, back in the day there were these kind of accessibility experts very apologetically saying, you really ought to, you know if you’ve got time, it really is quite important, you provide a transcript whenever you do video or audio.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
But now it really is, it’s kind of business critical now. Even if you go, sod disabled people, I don’t care about the deaf, they can’t hear me. So – but you really need to.

Marcus Lillington
Overheard, Paul.

Paul Boag
Well, it is going to be – that’s going to be in the transcript of this show because we get this show transcribed. And this is where we come onto the service that obviously helps us out a little bit. They are called Pods in Print. Right? podsinprint.com. Now, they produced transcripts that you can use on – anything you want, you can post it on your website, you can then use it to upload to your YouTube video, so it syncs the transcript to that if you needed to et cetera, et cetera. Beware mind. When it comes to transcription – we’ve been doing transcription for long time. Haven’t we?

Marcus Lillington
We have.

Paul Boag
Not all transcription services are equal by any stretch of the imagination. Right? And for a long time, I thought that you just had to accept that they weren’t particularly good, and so I’d get a transcription back and I’d have to go through it, find all the names of the products that we’ve mentioned, right, or the names of people that are always spelt wrong and go in correct them. Right? I just thought that’s what you had to do. That was the way it worked. And then I’ve tried this Pods in Print. Right? Now, we pay for this service, just to make it clear.

Marcus Lillington
Yes.

Paul Boag
And to be honest, we get I think it is 20% off because we promote…

Marcus Lillington
Because we are so famous, we’ve got such an enormous audience.

Paul Boag
Yeah, that’s what it is. But actually I would quite happily pay the full price and now they’ve discovered that we only have got three people we probably will have to. But it is an absolutely brilliant transcription service. They are so spot-on. For example, we haven’t had any particularly – I know BugHunt that we mentioned earlier. Right? It’s not a complicated name, BugHunt.

Marcus Lillington
Herd. BugHerd.

Paul Boag
BugHerd?

Marcus Lillington
Yes.

Paul Boag
Oh right. Was it?

Marcus Lillington
H-E-R-D, yeah.

Paul Boag
Okay.

Marcus Lillington
B-U-G-H-E-R-D.

Paul Boag
Okay, you are right. It’s not a complicated…

Marcus Lillington
It’s still there, look, BugHerd, on my screen.

Paul Boag
It’s not a complicated name, although obviously too complicated for me to remember but you can guarantee – in the show notes – it’ll be really interesting, I’ll bet the transcriber will now go back through to make sure this is the case.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
But you can guarantee, it will be put together as one word rather than two separate words, which is how they’ve got it on their website.

Marcus Lillington
Correct.

Paul Boag
They will go to that level of detail. They will make sure that it’s done right. The names are spelled right. I mean they don’t get it right 100% the time, of course they don’t, it’s impossible. And what gobsmacks me is our show is not an easy show to transcribe, especially when we’ve got Leigh on as well.

Marcus Lillington
And three of us talking over each other all the time.

Paul Boag
Yeah, absolutely.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, yeah.

Paul Boag
And they manage to make sense of it, most of the time. Sometimes I read through the transcription. I mean I don’t read through it every week now, because I’ve come to trust them so much. Sometimes I read through it and go, okay, that doesn’t make a lot of sense. But…

Marcus Lillington
But it probably didn’t if you were listening.

Paul Boag
But it probably – yeah, absolutely. Well, there is a classic example – and I said most of, and then you interrupted me.

Marcus Lillington
All the time.

Paul Boag
So this reads really badly, but that’s our fault, not theirs.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah.

Paul Boag
But they’ve managed to kind of pick through it and make something decent of it. I am just gobsmackingly impressed and obviously Mr. or Mrs. Transcriber, you are listening to us, right now, thank you.

Marcus Lillington
Merry Christmas.

Paul Boag
Absolutely. Merry Christmas. If I could give you a mince pie, I would.

Marcus Lillington
Ooh mince pie.

Paul Boag
Oh yeah. That’s it now, I’ve got to go down the shop and buy mince pies.

Marcus Lillington
I’ve got one downstairs.

Paul Boag
One?

Marcus Lillington
Yes, one.

Paul Boag
For you.

Marcus Lillington
For me. My name is on it.

Paul Boag
You’re going to give it to me as a gift. Aren’t you?

Marcus Lillington
Yes, Paul, that’s right.

Paul Boag
So there we go, that’s this week’s show, check out Pods in Print, check out voices.com, check out BugHunt and check out other stuff, Zite and Brackets. See, I do remember everything on the show.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah. BugHunt again you said it.

Paul Boag
I did it again.

Marcus Lillington
BugHerd.

Paul Boag
Herd, herd, herd.

Marcus Lillington
Yes. So we’re going to have lots of days off holiday, I can’t wait.

Paul Boag
So no more having to listen to your jokes until – oh, yes, we need to talk about that. Do we want to talk about that now or after your joke? What’s happening next year?

Marcus Lillington
What’s happening next year, Paul?

Paul Boag
What’s happening next year? So, next year, we are coming back. The first show will be – he says bringing up his calendar – first show will come out on the 17th, Friday the 17th of January, because we come back on the 7th and so it won’t be transcribed for that week, normally.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, yeah.

Paul Boag
That’s the other thing to say about – don’t go back to it. You’ll work it out, check them out, because we – it takes a week for our transcriptions to come through, although you can get them faster. So, we’ll be back on the 17th.

Marcus Lillington
Yes.

Paul Boag
In terms of what we’re doing…

Marcus Lillington
What are we doing, Paul?

Paul Boag
Well, I said before that we were doing a questions and answers time.

Marcus Lillington
Right. So that’s three shows then, maximum.

Paul Boag
No, no. No, I think it’ll work. But I’ve decided I don’t want to do that because I don’t care what people’s questions are and I don’t care what they think.

Marcus Lillington
We’re going to make up the questions.

Paul Boag
No, no.

Marcus Lillington
That’s what will happen, anyway.

Paul Boag
We will do that as a future show, but I don’t want to do it this next one. The reason being is that I want to beef up our question-answer section on the site before we do that.

Marcus Lillington
Okay.

Paul Boag
Because I’ve got some ideas about that. So what we’re going to do instead for the next season, so that season will run between 17th of January and Easter.

Marcus Lillington
Okay.

Paul Boag
Right? And what we’re going to do is we’re going to do our pick of the posts, so we’re going to do top posts.

Marcus Lillington
Zite will be useful for that. Can I talk about guitars and cricket.

Paul Boag
No. They have to be web design posts.

Marcus Lillington
So boring.

Paul Boag
But I’ll tell you what we will do, right?

Marcus Lillington
We can have one a week.

Paul Boag
We will have one a week.

Marcus Lillington
Specialist interest.

Paul Boag
One a week that you pick. Right? A post that you pick once a week.

Marcus Lillington
Right.

Paul Boag
And it could be on anything you want it to be.

Marcus Lillington
Really?

Paul Boag
Yes.

Marcus Lillington
Oh alright then.

Paul Boag
Alright?

Marcus Lillington
Deal?

Paul Boag
Deal. So we will do three web design posts and then your pick of the week.

Marcus Lillington
Sure.

Paul Boag
We didn’t prepare – we didn’t discuss this before. But are you alright with that?

Marcus Lillington
Let’s make this up as we go along. Of course.

Paul Boag
Right. So that’s going to happen between New Year and Easter. We really want your picks as well, mind, we don’t want just ours mainly because I don’t want to put all the effort into finding all these posts. So, you can go along to boagworld.com, you find the new season page that will be up very, very soon, and then you can make suggestions in the comments. But there’s a couple of things I want to say about it. First, they don’t need to be current posts, they can be classics. Like, one, I can guarantee that we will cover will be Cameron Moll’s post on A List Apart about the difference between great design and normal design. So that’s a really good post. And there are various ones like that, the classic posts.

Marcus Lillington
I can think of a few you’ve written.

Paul Boag
Well, obviously. I’ve written nothing but decent posts. I know where you are going but I’m not going to be led. So we’re going to do that. So, yeah, make your suggestions. The other thing I wanted to say with that is I really want to encourage people to explain why they’ve picked their post. What is it about it that particularly jumped out at them? Which you could obviously do in the comments, but we would really, really, love audio comments as well.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, definitely.

Paul Boag
So, it just makes the show a bit more interesting, having somebody else’s voice other than us. So what we’re going to do is there will be a little service that we’re going link to that – where you can go along and you can record your audio straight through your browser, you save it, they give you a URL and you can just copy and paste that URL into the comments field in – on the show notes. So that is what we’ve got planned for next year. I hope you are as excited about us because there are some really, I am excited about the next season, there are some really good posts out there and people are writing some really intelligent and clever stuff and it’ll be like our old new section that we used to do back in the day.

Marcus Lillington
Exactly.

Paul Boag
So it should be really good. Marcus, give us a joke.

Marcus Lillington
Okay. I met a Dutch girl with inflatable shoes last week. I phoned her up to arrange a date but unfortunately she’d popped her clogs. That’s marvelous.

Paul Boag
That’s not Christmassy. It is not a Christmas joke. Look, I am going to show…

Marcus Lillington
I have got a Christmas joke.

Paul Boag
…and I am going to – you could do your Christmas joke then.

Marcus Lillington
Hang on.

Paul Boag
But while you’re finding that, I am going to prove how easy the job is, that you make such a performance of. Christian… Christian jokes? No, Christmas jokes. Don’t make a comment, Marcus. Here we go. This is how easy your job is. Right? You Google it and then I can’t find any jokes.

Marcus Lillington
I found one. I’ve got a – this is a Christmas joke, I have done it before but it’s so good I am going to do it. Well, hang on a minute. Where is it – hang on – so many jokes in this page. Ah here we go. Three men die in a car accident on Christmas Eve, they all find themselves at the pearly gates waiting to enter heaven, on entering they are told that they must present something Christmassy in order to get in. The first man searches his pocket and find some pine needles from the family’s Christmas tree, he is let in. The second man presents a bow and some ribbon from the presents that were opened earlier in the night, so he is also allowed in. Third man pulls out a pair of panties. Confused at this gesture St. Peter asks, how do these represent Christmas? To which he replies, oh they are Carol’s.

Paul Boag
Okay, fair enough.

Marcus Lillington
That is a good Christmas joke.

Paul Boag
Why does Santa have three gardens?

Marcus Lillington
I don’t know, Paul.

Paul Boag
So he can ho ho ho. There you go, you see that’s a good one.

Marcus Lillington
That is quite a good one.

Paul Boag
Why are Santa’s little helpers depressed?

Marcus Lillington
Why are Santa’s…?

Paul Boag
Because they have low elf esteem.

Marcus Lillington
That’s really bad.

Paul Boag
That’s a bad one. What do elves learn in school? The elphabet.

Marcus Lillington
That’s not funny, even though I laughed.

Paul Boag
Where do Polar bears vote? The North Pole…

Marcus Lillington
That’s bad. Stop now.

Paul Boag
Why do birds fly south for the winter? Why do birds fly south for the winter?

Marcus Lillington
I don’t know.

Paul Boag
Because it’s too far to walk.

Marcus Lillington
They’re getting worse, Paul.

Paul Boag
What do snowmen for breakfast? Snow flakes. These are great – these are classic good jokes.

Marcus Lillington
These are not great jokes.

Paul Boag
And how quickly did I find those.

Marcus Lillington
They are the opposite of great jokes. The one I found was a good one. Yours are all rubbish apart from ho, ho, ho.

Paul Boag
What do you call a cat on the beach at Christmas time? Sandy Claws. See, that’s great. What’s your problem?

Marcus Lillington
It’s not great.

Paul Boag
Anyway, Happy Christmas everybody. And we will speak to you again in the New Year.

Marcus Lillington
Yeah, bye.

Santa Claus looks out of paper from Bigstock.com

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