10 gadgets every digital professional should own

Paul Boag

This week on the Boagworld show we drool over the sexiest and most useful gadgets for any digital professional.

Paul Boag:
This week on the Boagworld show we drool over the sexiest and most useful gadgets for any web professional.

Add your suggestions in the comments

Hello and welcome to boagworld.com, the podcast for all those involved in designing, developing and running websites on a daily basis. And my name is Paul Boag and I’m standing by the old introduction. I don’t know how to start the show without it.

Marcus Lillington:

That’s because of that horrible term digital that we’ve kind of embraced, but no one really likes. We discussed digital last week so we’re not going to do that, or the week before. What does digital mean, blegh.

Paul Boag:
Blegh, blegh to it all.

Marcus Lillington:

I had an interesting day, Paul.

Paul Boag:
Why have you had an interesting day?

Marcus Lillington:

I’ve got some new glasses.

Paul Boag:
Yes. Does that mean you can actually read stuff now?

Marcus Lillington:

Well, yes. But when I sat down to my desk this morning, I couldn’t see my screen which was sort of at the back of the desk. So I need my old glasses for seeing the screen and my new glasses for stuff that’s up kind of close near my hand.

Paul Boag:
Oh, that’s not progress then really, is it?

Marcus Lillington:

No I just have to pull the screen closer to me. But more exciting and much more interesting that although kind of frustrating in the end is we had a flyer put through the door this morning, this is in the office saying there is a shoe sale on downstairs, because one of the company’s in our building I think they kind of they’re a shoe supplier to like the big – Debenhams and Harvey Nicholls and places like that. And they have obviously last season’s stuff, and we’re like “oh oh posh shoes for 10 quid”, but of course they’re all in size 8 and 9, because they’re the ones that look the best when they’re photographed.

Paul Boag:
That’s really annoying, because I’m a size 9.

Marcus Lillington:

Oh right. Well, you would have been – you would have had 30 pairs of really classy pairs of shoes to pick from for about a tenner a go.

Paul Boag:
That is so annoying, because literally just moments before this show started I just bought a new pair of winter shoes, at 65 quid.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, well these are the kind of shoes that are £150, £200. The really posh ones, Loakes and Jones the Bootmaker.

Paul Boag:
I would say go and get me a pair, but I don’t trust your taste.

Marcus Lillington:

Why not? I’m a – I’ve superb taste. It’s not quite as young maybe as yours, but that’s probably a good thing for you, Paul, because you’re not young any more.

Paul Boag:
Are you implying that I dress like a teenager? Is this what you’re saying?

Marcus Lillington:

It might have been.

Paul Boag:
Anyway, see I really could have done with a cheap pair of shoes as well, because today it’s going to get very, very expensive, very quickly for me.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes. Okay, but you can’t actually buy anything today though, can you?

Paul Boag:
No. No, it’s the Apple announcement today. So we’re recording this on the 9th and Apple are going to announce a load of stuff tonight that obviously I have to buy, whether I want it or not. It’s a curse, Marcus. It’s a curse, I tell you.

Marcus Lillington:

Well, I quite like Apple stuff. And we’re talking about gadgets on this show?

Paul Boag:
Exactly, we are. What a wonderful segue into what we’re actually talking about.

Marcus Lillington:

But so I was going to start talking about gadgets and I thought oh maybe I ought not to because I will cover stuff.

Paul Boag:
Well, I don’t think we talk about phones or smartwatches, which are the two things that are probably going to be announced today.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, smartwatch again doesn’t really apply to me; because I would have to have the text so big you’d only be able to get a couple, like two characters on it. But a bigger iPhone …

Paul Boag:
How do you tell the time on your watch, because you’re a great fan of nice watches, aren’t you? So how do you tell the time on them?

Marcus Lillington:

My current watch which I like – that I like very, very much. I can’t see it in the dark. If I’m in a dark, not a very well lit room, I can look at my watch and not see what it says. It’s also – its not on, it’s got a – it’s a black face with silver numbers and things on it.

Paul Boag:
That doesn’t help, does it?

Marcus Lillington:

And it’s also got basically five hands on it and two of which are always pointing up unless you use them, they’re for like stopwatches, fancy stuff which I never use, which kind of makes everything look like it’s a clock, but its not. So I’m currently investigating watches that have big numbers.

Paul Boag:
There you go – you need the new Apple iWatch because you will be able to change the faces on it.

Marcus Lillington:

It might be absolutely perfect for me. I somehow suspect it won’t though.

Paul Boag:
No, it’s not your kind of thing, is it really? You’re too much – again, you’re too much of a grown up.

Marcus Lillington:

It depends what it looks like.

Paul Boag:
It does. Well, yes you don’t know? Apple might do something quite nice. I mean, obviously its going to – I expect it to be better than many of the ones that are out there at the moment, that all look like bricks.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, exactly.

Paul Boag:
But at the end of the day, you are trying to strap a computer to your wrist. So its not going to look quite as elegant as a proper watch, one would guess.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, I’m sending you a link of a watch that I’m currently thinking would be rather nice.

Paul Boag:
This is really good for an audio podcast.

Marcus Lillington:

Well, you can include it in the show notes.

Paul Boag:
Oh, you bastard.

Marcus Lillington:

But this has got big numbers and luminous hands.

Paul Boag:
It’s one of those old people remotes. Are you going to get one of those old people remote controls? The ones that they advertise on television with massive buttons.

Marcus Lillington:

With the really big buttons. No, I don’t need – don’t need to do that.

Paul Boag:
Oh, I do like that.

Marcus Lillington:

Isn’t it nice?

Paul Boag:
It is nice. It’s still black faced, but with very – yes, very clear, very simple, very stylish, and 500 frigging quid.

Marcus Lillington:

That’s really cheap Paul for a Swiss automatic, that’s a very cheap price.

Paul Boag:
But all it does is tell the time.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, but it’s also a piece of jewelry.

Paul Boag:
500 quid, you wouldn’t get me spending that on a watch unless it was smartwatch and can kind of revive me from the dead and things like that.

Marcus Lillington:

Well, I’m showing you another one, while we’re here.

Paul Boag:
Now you’re going to expect me to put that one in the show notes too, aren’t you?

Marcus Lillington:

Yes.

Paul Boag:
Then that’s it after this next one.

Marcus Lillington:

Hang on a minute.

Paul Boag:
I will tell you which of these two to buy. So the first one just to describe it to the audio listeners, is a brown leather strap, very nice strap, but the face is very nice. It’s got a very Swiss feel to it. Black face with beautiful simple typography for the 12, the 9, the 3 and the 6

Marcus Lillington:

Gorgeous isn’t it?

Paul Boag:
And then very strong dividers, but what I really like about it is that the hands are lit up bright white. So even Marcus can’t miss it. So it’s very much a watch aimed at people whose vision is going.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes.

Paul Boag:
The second watch he’s selected, oh I don’t like that as much, no.

Marcus Lillington:

No?

Paul Boag:
No, nowhere near as nice.

Marcus Lillington:

Okay.

Paul Boag:
Oh Siri is – thinks I’m speaking to it. Shut up, Siri. That’s the trouble with iOS 8. Now if it hears something that it thinks sounds like its name, it responds and wakes up if it’s plugged into power. Anyway, anyway …

Marcus Lillington:

Good job too because that one is £2,500.

Paul Boag:
Bloody hell there is no way. No way is that better than the other one. It’s got shitty ugly typography. It’s all a bit rounded that the typography is a bit rounded.

Marcus Lillington:

It’s a copy of a World War 1 pilot.

Paul Boag:
Yes, I know, yes.

Marcus Lillington:

It’s not a copy; it’s a rework of their original.

Paul Boag:
Yes, okay. But then, I don’t like the strap either. It’s a shiny kind of black crocodile leather strap. It’s disgusting.

Marcus Lillington:

Goes with – it’s all part of the style anyway.

Paul Boag:
No, get the other one.

Marcus Lillington:

I think the other one with it being £500 instead of £2,500. I think is a lot more likely.

Paul Boag:
Would you ever spend £2,500,000 on a watch, really?

Marcus Lillington:

Possibly.

Paul Boag:
How much have you spent on the one you’re wearing at the moment, the one you can’t read?

Marcus Lillington:

It was £600 – £650.

Paul Boag:
It’s a lot of money isn’t it?

Marcus Lillington:

Well no, because it’s probably worth more than that now. Most decent watches go up in value.

Paul Boag:
So you will be able to sell that watch on?

Marcus Lillington:

Yes.

Paul Boag:
I will be interested to see, but it’s something I know nothing about, watches. So this is all completely new to me and very mysterious. Now on the other hand …

Marcus Lillington:

They’re really nice things.

Paul Boag:
… gadgets, which is what we’re talking about today, now that ….

Marcus Lillington:

Well, they’re the original gadget.

Paul Boag:
Yes, I guess they’re in many ways, aren’t they?

Marcus Lillington:

Or the penknife I suppose was the original gadget, but same sort of thing.

Paul Boag:
Yes.

Marcus Lillington:

All of which I like very much, you don’t have to be able to plug a gadget in for it to be a gadget.

Paul Boag:
No. That’s very true. I agree with that. I fully accept that, because you get cyclist gadgets don’t you and photographer’s gadgets and, but we’re going to be talking about digital professionals gadgets.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, quite. I’m looking forward to this, because I will be able to take the piss so much.

Paul Boag:
This was really quite difficult. I know you are. This was really quite difficult to do because I was trying to find stuff that applied to designers, developers, and kind of website owners and copywriters.

Marcus Lillington:

Referencing the introduction again there, Paul.

Paul Boag:
I know, but it’s true. I tried to kind of get the whole range of things which made it quite a challenging thing to do, and I don’t think I have succeeded. So some of these will be useful and others won’t. And obviously Marcus will just criticize every choice that I’ve made, but I have to say everything on this list is considerably cheaper than a £2,500 flippin watch and one of them is a whole flippin laptop.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, true.

Paul Boag:
So anyway shall we begin then?

Marcus Lillington:

We can do. Can I just make the point because I was talking about watches that I really fancy a bigger screen iPhone.

Paul Boag:
Yes.

Marcus Lillington:

That would be a nice thing.

Paul Boag:
By the time people are listening to this, you will have one on the way.

Marcus Lillington:

Possibly not. Probably won’t, I will stick with my iPhone 5S for a while.

Paul Boag:
Really?

Marcus Lillington:

Yes.

Paul Boag:
Fool.

Marcus Lillington:

It’s all right. It’s fine.

Paul Boag:
Honestly. You call yourself a digital professional. That’s fine. All the more …

Marcus Lillington:

I can’t honestly say I have ever referred to myself as a digital professional.

Paul Boag:
I know it’s such a such arsey title. It’s becoming increasingly difficult to describe people, isn’t it?

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, I know what you mean.

Paul Boag:
So yes, now all the more gadgets for me that’s fine.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, good.

Paul Boag:
One less person in front of me in the queue. There were people queuing a week ago and there wasn’t even a product – there wasn’t even – it wasn’t even announced when it was going to be.

Marcus Lillington:

What?

Paul Boag:
I know it’s just insanity.

Marcus Lillington:

Where?

Paul Boag:
New York obviously, Americans, bless them.

Marcus Lillington:

But why would you queue for something that isn’t there?

Paul Boag:
Because they knew it was coming.

Marcus Lillington:

Oh what just in case?

Paul Boag:
Essentially yes. And you think I’m bad.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes. Yes, you’re not that bad.

Paul Boag:
Anyway, this is my third attempt at starting the show. So let’s talk about gadgets.

An ultra thin, ultra light laptop

Macbook Air

So yes, as you – if you listened to last week’s show, you’ll know we are looking at the top 10 gadgets that every digital professional should own. And I think this was Leigh’s idea, wasn’t it as a show? And I quite liked it as an idea.

Marcus Lillington:

It was Leigh’s idea and we were going to have him on and then we thought nah screw him, yes.

Paul Boag:
He needs to be getting on with work.

Marcus Lillington:

He does actually.

Paul Boag:
He doesn’t have time for lazing around doing this. So number one on our list, now what I’ve tried to do with this is I’ve tried to get not to – right, I’ve tried to get to the core of what you’re looking for from the gadget rather than necessarily saying a particular one, if that makes sense.

Marcus Lillington:

But we will all know which one you mean.

Paul Boag:
Well, each one I’m going to say my personal choice, but as soon as I started to make – I started off by – well let me do number one. Number one is an ultra thin, ultra fast laptop.

Marcus Lillington:

You don’t say that in the notes.

Paul Boag:
No, I don’t. I’ve mistyped it in the notes. Obviously, what – what I was thinking about was the MacBook Air, but it doesn’t have to be the MacBook Air.

Marcus Lillington:

No, there are many, many small tiny PCs.

Paul Boag:
Yes, absolutely. But it’s this idea I think that as digital professionals we want to be able to move about. We want flexibility in where we work, when we work and I think that applies to pretty much everybody really. And I think there are some exceptions, if you’re a videographer or you’ve been doing a lot with video or animation all that kind of stuff. You need a machine that’s got real kind of guts to it, that can process all of this stuff. But for the vast majority of us, our requirements are actually quite light. Reasonable, good, lightweight, thin laptop is more than capable of running Photoshop, its more than capable of allowing you to code in, do any coding in different environments, right copy, whatever else you need to do. The only maybe exception is running a lot of virtual sessions simultaneously that I know some people do, that can kind of push it to the limits. But I think generally speaking, the days of us needing A, to be tied to a desktop is definitely gone. But B, I think even to lug around some of these monster laptops that many of us for years used to pull around.

Marcus Lillington:

What you mean, like a MacBook Pro, Paul?

Paul Boag:
Shut up. I made a bad decision, what can I say.

Marcus Lillington:

It’s got a retina screen.

Paul Boag:
I know, I fell for the retina screen and it was the wrong decision, it was made in a rush because I poured orange squash all over my MacBook Air while I was with a client and it killed my MacBook Air and I thought oh, I will get something different. And I got the Pro and regret it.

Marcus Lillington:

I love my MacBook Air.

Paul Boag:
Absolutely.

Marcus Lillington:

This is where I get a bit like you. I’ve had two now and the second one it’s exactly the same as the last one. And I’m running logic audio and recording it now.

Paul Boag:
Which is a fairly substantial piece of kit isn’t it?

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, I mean few years ago you wouldn’t have dreamt of putting something like that on a computer like this. They’re perfectly – as you say, if it’s kind of anything that involves something 3D like video, then yes you need more power I guess. But I can run multiple audio channels at the same time.

Paul Boag:
There are some really good windows versions as well. There is Sony do some great very thin PCs, even Dell now do some really nice ultra light, ultra thin PCs or laptops, should I say. So definitely kind of look at the options that are out there and find the one that’s right for you, but it’s that ability to have something that allows you to move around, because I think one of the most freeing things about doing what we do for a living is the ability to do it from anywhere and I don’t think we take enough advantage of that or a lot of people don’t.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes. I’ve got – yesterday I got out of bed at half past five in the morning, I caught the half past six train into London Waterloo, I went across London and got another train from London Kings Cross to York in North Yorkshire. I did a presentation to a prospective client, I got back on the train, came down, went across London, got on the other train and my battery and I’d been using it on all the train journeys and during the presentation my battery was at 56%. It’s superb.

Paul Boag:
And you were able to work that whole way?

Marcus Lillington:

Yes.

Paul Boag:
Which is actually really bad. With the old days you would have just got to sit there and chill out.

Marcus Lillington:

I did read my book for a bit.

Paul Boag:
So we’ve just undermined our whole argument, haven’t we? You need an ultra-thin, ultra-light laptop, so you can work hard and damn you.

Marcus Lillington:

But you can work wherever you want to I guess.

Paul Boag:
Absolutely.

Marcus Lillington:

You don’t have to lug around a power pack like you used to, the old Dell laptops and you had to carry this thing around with you, because it would last 10 minutes on battery. But the old Mac’s were like that as well.

Paul Boag:
Yes. And I know a lot of people that are listening to this we get quite a lot of students listening as well, and I would – I think if there was a single investment you could make in technology it would be a good light laptop that’s thin and powerful and good battery life. It is absolutely invaluable and it will last you – they last you a long time now as well. You don’t feel like you’re kind of using shit machines within 24 months of getting it anymore which…

Marcus Lillington:

Well this one must be nearly a year old now and it looks exactly the same as the one I had for three and a bit years before that one.

Paul Boag:
Yes.

Marcus Lillington:

So they haven’t changed. The design is still gorgeous just this one it’s got – it’s more powerful.

Paul Boag:
Yes, so definitely check that out, that is our number one recommendation really. Out of the whole list, I think that’s the best, you can turn off now. Alright let’s do number two.

A super fast document scanner

Evernote Scanner

So the second one is probably a bit more of a controversial one.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes.

Paul Boag:
So , the second one, I’m saying is I think most digital professionals need a nice quick fast document scanner. And my logic for this is that as digital people we get all kinds of stuff thrown at us from all kinds of different directions and we’re very good, most of us are very organized and we kind of keep everything neat and tidy until somebody hands us paper and then our whole systems fall apart. We end up with big-arse filing cabinets full of stuff. And one of the best things I ever did was get a fast document scanner. The one that I have is the Evernote scanner, because I’m a huge Evernote fan, but it’s basically a Fujitsu, I think it’s Fujitsu’s ScanSnap or SnapScan or something like that. Scanner, there is Doxie scanners, there is all kind – oh Doxie scanners, sorry, I will put a link in the show notes to these. And they’re all great scanners. What’s so good about them is their speed. They can do dual sided scanning in literally a fraction of a second is what it feels like anyway; literally it’s probably not entirely true. I suspect it’s probably about a second, it can do an A4 piece of paper. And you know when I got the Evernote scanner I went through two drawerss of filing cabinets in a couple of hours and just threw out shit loads of stuff that was cluttering up my life. Go on then, Marcus, you know you want to tell me I’m wrong and be rude and carry on. Get it out of your system, you like the paper.

Marcus Lillington:

I use a scanner regularly, not to copy the stuff that’s in my filing cabinet. I think that’s just making more work for you, yourself really? What’s wrong with the filing cabinet?

Paul Boag:
Well, you can’t search a filing cabinet.

Marcus Lillington:

Well how often do you need to search your filing cabinet?

Paul Boag:
Well, what’s the point in keeping it, if you don’t need it?

Marcus Lillington:

Well, my theory and this is a personal theory, it doesn’t work for a business, but for sort of like your own stuff. If you like, your mortgage deeds and things like that. I do have them reasonably categorized, but generally I just have a kind of a pile of stuff which I will kind of go through maybe once a year, most of which gets binned, some of which gets put in into the filing cabinet. I guess, I could scan it at that point, but why bother frankly.

Paul Boag:
Yes, I can kind of see where you’re coming from with personal stuff, but I think for me it’s more the kind of work related stuff getting rid of all of that and those kinds of things.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes. I mean I don’t keep a lot of work paper and I do have to scan a lot of documents if you do – if you do the salesy side of things and you’re always scanning contracts and stuff, then you’re having to sign things to send over to potential clients and all that kind of stuff, so yes, I often have to scan things. It did make me realize that my scanner is the same scanner I bought when Headscape started. It is – the quality isn’t as good. I imagine it’s not that good as scanning photographs anymore. Although I got it for the reason that it was it could do slides as well, it’s got a little slides attachment.

Paul Boag:
Who uses those anymore?

Marcus Lillington:

But it doesn’t I mean I reckon it will scan a side of A4 in probably four seconds.

Paul Boag:
Yes, I think the one that I like is you can take a big old wodge of paper, you can put in the feeder, it churns them out and then it’s all a nice PDF in Evernote waiting to be sent to someone.

Marcus Lillington:

You said one word in there that sold it to me, feeder. I have to lift the lid, take the piece of paper out, put the next bit in, put the lid back down.

Paul Boag:
Oh, right. Yes, no these are ones you can just put a wodge of paper in and churns through them.

Marcus Lillington:

Oh that’s superb. I want one.

Paul Boag:
Yes, I mean we’re not talking about – it’s not the best photo scanner in the world, but …

Marcus Lillington:

Who scans photos?

Paul Boag:
For documents it’s brilliant. The other thing, of course, the modern ones do as well as you can shove things like – let’s take the Evernote scanner is I can shove some letters in there, I can shove receipts in there, business cards, all mixed up together. It will pull them through obviously the receipts get pulled in an angle because you’ve got a wider thing. It will straighten them using software. It identifies them as receipts and files them as receipts. Business cards, it pulls out all the individual fields on the business card and puts it in a contact for you, also connects to LinkedIn, sees if it can find additional information about the person and this is a frigging scanner.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, that’s good. I’m impressed.

Paul Boag:
So they have come a long way. When you say a document scanner it sounds deadly dull, doesn’t it? You just think about a flatbed scanner. This is something that can it is for document management and it is really – it is really good, but it’s very expensive. The Evernote scanner is not a cheap machine. The Doxie scanner is much more reasonable, but the prices do vary. But it’s certainly not £2,500 watch. So that’s good. And in fact I can get a document scanner for less than your cheap watch and it’s a lot more useful too. So there were go. So let’s move on to number three.

Marcus Lillington:

But it doesn’t look as nice and you can’t wear it.

Paul Boag:
Well, you could do. You’d just look a bit stupid.

Marcus Lillington:

You could wear it.

Paul Boag:
Walking around with a big-arse scanner hanging around your neck.

Marcus Lillington:

Move on.

Paul Boag:
Okay. Number three.

A capacity expanding router

TP Link TL-R470T+ router

Right, this one is only for certain people.

Marcus Lillington:

What is this? I don’t know what this is. I don’t understand the words.

Paul Boag:
No, you don’t understand the words, ah bless. So this is a problem I’ve come across right?

Marcus Lillington:

What? Me not understanding the words?

Paul Boag:
Yes, that’s a problem I’ve struggled with for many, many years, Marcus. So I’ve got okay broadband here, but not amazing, because I don’t live in an area that’s got cable.

Marcus Lillington:

Ditto.

Paul Boag:
There are some people that are getting like 100mb down.

Marcus Lillington:

I get 10.

Paul Boag:
Yes, I mean I will get 8 here.

Marcus Lillington:

Right. Do you find if you’re scanning – if you’re streaming a film that it stops quite a lot?

Paul Boag:
Yes, it would have.

Marcus Lillington:

Mine does.

Paul Boag:
Mine doesn’t anymore and this is the fix for it.

Marcus Lillington:

Oh, okay. I’m interested, perks ears up, listens.

Paul Boag:
It’s not – it can work out as a relatively expensive fix, but I think if you’re a digital person like we are, it’s absolutely essential that you have good fast internet connection.

Marcus Lillington:

So I can watch films.

Paul Boag:
So you can watch films. No, it’s for other stuff – upload as well. Upload is painful on my connection.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, it’s mine as well.

Paul Boag:
So, what this is, is it’s called – I’ve written a capacity expanding router, because I can’t think of the proper name for it. The router that I’ve got is it a TP link TL-R470T+. I will put a link in the show notes, don’t worry. So what this can do is it can take multiple connections into it, so you can get a second line installed into your house, with a second broadband connection. And this router can combine them together. Strictly speaking, it doesn’t combine them, it load balances across them, which in most situations it might as well combine them as far as you’re concerned. So let’s say you’ve got a video that you’re trying to stream from Netflix or whatever, it will send – it will take some packets down one line and some packets down another. I’ve no idea how it manages to do it, but it does it.

Marcus Lillington:

I’ve got two phone lines.

Paul Boag:
Have you really?

Marcus Lillington:

Yes.

Paul Boag:
So you could easily do this and it would essentially to all intents and purposes double your speed. Now I’ve some techie people tell me oh no, it doesn’t actually double your speed, but it in terms of I don’t know what it does and I’m not claiming that I’m a sys admin and I understand all this stuff, but as far as – my experience is it’s pretty much doubled the speed of my internet connection.

Marcus Lillington:

Right, blimey.

Paul Boag:
So obviously you have to then pay for two lines coming in the house.

Marcus Lillington:

But I’ve already got that.

Paul Boag:
No, I mean two – you will have to sign up twice with your ISP.

Marcus Lillington:

Oh I see, right. No, I don’t do that.

Paul Boag:
But you could always, the second one you could use one of these really cheap ones like TalkTalk or whatever, do you know what I mean?

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, it’s only 30 quid for the router.

Paul Boag:
Yes, and so it’s not – we’re not talking a huge amount of money and it’s – you end up with a really – a much better connection and I’m really glad I’ve done it. You can also do things like you could also even have it set up to tether – connected it to like a MiFi device for mobile. And you think why the hell would I do that, because obviously I have a limited data allowance on that. But what you could do is set it as a backup. So if for some reason your Internet connection goes down, it will fall back to your MiFi, your mobile network, which is a great way of keeping you on line. The other thing I – the other problem I had is, I had a lot of dropped packets, because the line isn’t particularly good. So sometimes my Internet would drop down completely, but of course now I’ve got two lines in, the chance of them both failing simultaneously is very unlikely. So I’ve never – since I’ve installed this and got it up and running, I’ve constantly had Internet access without any problems whatsoever.

Marcus Lillington:

Do they do a Wi-Fi version of this one as well?

Paul Boag:
Of the router, no. What you would need is you then get a little Wi-Fi router that’s plugged into it, so I’ve an Apple …

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, I’ve got one as well, but I’ve got upstairs and downstairs Wi-Fi in my house that has foot and a half thick walls.

Paul Boag:
Oh, okay. But that’s alright. That’s just an extender. How do you get it upstairs at the moment?

Marcus Lillington:

Well, the main one is upstairs where my office is and then I basically plug via the power circuit in the house down into the living room.

Paul Boag:
Yes, well you can still do that.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, I’d just have to have another Wi-Fi one for upstairs.

Paul Boag:
Yes.

Marcus Lillington:

So I’d have to have two.

Paul Boag:
To be honest you could probably still use the router that you’re currently using upstairs.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, of course. Yes, I’ve got that one anyway. So yes.

Paul Boag:
Yes, you just have a router connected into a router and one isn’t routing. It’s a little bit fiddly to set up, but once you’ve done it it’s absolutely brilliant. I highly recommend it.

Marcus Lillington:

So what I need to do is get – set up another broadband account.

Paul Boag:
Another ISP, broadband account. Yes, absolutely. So that is our third recommendation.

Inductive charging wireless mouse

Mobee Mouse Charger

Okay, so this must be our fourth. No? Yes, fourth, that’s right. So this is a silly little one, but I think it’s quite a good one. You have a Magic Mouse as well, don’t you?

Marcus Lillington:

I do. I love my Magic Mouse, it is a thing of wonder.

Paul Boag:
But not everybody does and that’s fine. What you need is you need, if you are going to have a mouse, you need one that doesn’t have batteries. My reason being for this is that I used to get through an enormous number of batteries just huge numbers and it’s killing the planet people and also it gets very expensive. So, but I also I don’t want a wired battery either, because they’re pain in the ass. So what I settled on is a Mobee mouse charger alright. So basically, if you pick up your mouse and you turn it over, you have got a battery compartment on the back right. So what you do is you take out that battery compartment and you put in your Mobee mouse charger and then you have a little platform that sits on your desk and when you’re done with your mouse, you put it down on the little platform and it has inductive charging through it. So it will keep your mouse constantly charged up without the need to constantly replace the batteries.

Marcus Lillington:

And what happens is you arrive at the office on a Tuesday morning and you get your mouse out and you go oh damn it’s run out of power.

Paul Boag:
And that’s fine because in your bag you keep a couple of spare batteries and you pop out the Mobee mouse bit and you put in two normal batteries.

Marcus Lillington:

I didn’t do that, Paul, because I put it onto charge last night like a good boy.

Paul Boag:
There you go. So I really recommend it, it’s really good little thing. Do you already have one of these then?

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, I’ve had one for ages.

Paul Boag:
No, I didn’t know that. You’re very cutting edge.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, aren’t I the geek?

Paul Boag:
I’m impressed.

Marcus Lillington:

What I want is one for my keyboard as well.

Paul Boag:
Yes, I know. I can’t find the right solution for that. But yes, not saying that you have to have a Magic Mouse and go Apple route again, there are other inductive mouse charging systems for other mice so. Check it out, but it’s a really good way. Get away from having those batteries because I think they do eat through your power. Okay, talking of keyboards, that brings us on to number five.

A keyboard that can control multiple devices

Logitech Easy Switch Bluetooth Keyboard

So this is a nice one. This is a quick switch keyboard, a Bluetooth keyboard. You have a Bluetooth keyboard, don’t you?

Marcus Lillington:

I do, yes.

Paul Boag:
Yes. So you’ve got the Apple one haven’t you?

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, the little tiny Apple one, brilliant. Put it in my bag, carry around with me.

Paul Boag:
Absolutely and they’re lovely, aren’t they. They’re really great. I’ve got one that’s identical dimensions, looks and feels pretty much – no, it doesn’t look, it’s black rather than white isn’t it the keys, but essentially it looks like a normal Mac keyboard, same size, same type of keys etcetera, except I have three buttons.

Marcus Lillington:

Do you?

Paul Boag:
Yes, it’s very exciting. I have more than three keys on my keyboard just to be clear, because you have all the normal keys.

Marcus Lillington:

You have three extra buttons.

Paul Boag:
Three extra buttons, well actually its F1, F2 and F3, but that’s beside the point. And by clicking each of those buttons, I can switch to a different Bluetooth device. So with my F1 button, I’m controlling my Mac. With my F2, I’m controlling my iPhone and with my F3 I’m controlling my iPad Mini. And it means that I can type on any of those devices very quickly and very easily. So if somebody sends me a text, I can reply to them using a proper keyboard on my iPhone or if I’m travelling somewhere and I just take my iPad with me and I don’t want to take my MacBook and so I shove the keyboard in my bag, then I can use my iPad and I can type stuff on there. So it’s a really useful way of switching between them, and it means that at any one time I’ve got three screens available to me. So I normally use my iPhone I have – I tend to use Spotify on which admittedly I don’t need a keyboard with, but I do when I’m texting. And my iPad constantly has Twitter up and running on it. And so if – I want to reply to someone’s tweet, I can do it using my same keyboard and I don’t have to switch to a – to the touchscreen, pretty cool eh?

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, keep talking.

Paul Boag:
Why?

Marcus Lillington:

I’m looking it up.

Paul Boag:
The particular one I’ve got is the Logitech Easy-Switch Bluetooth keyboard. Although there are better ones out there and I searched for ages trying to find the one that allows you to do like five devices, but I couldn’t find it for some reason, because I’m a numpty.

Marcus Lillington:

Logitech K811 Bluetooth Easy-Switch keyboard for Mac iPad iPhone.

Paul Boag:
But to be honest, it could be with any Bluetooth device, I don’t know why they say Mac iPhone or iPad, it could be an android device with Bluetooth, it really doesn’t make any difference.

Marcus Lillington:

This is great, more things I can buy on the company, magic.

Paul Boag:
Exactly. And it’s a really good useful nice keyboard, just – it’s just as nice to use as the one you’ve got at the moment Marcus.

Marcus Lillington:

It looks a bit different. It looks more sort of rubbery keys.

Paul Boag:
It’s not, it’s not. Same feel keys.

Marcus Lillington:

Okay. Alright.

Paul Boag:
Just a picture I’m guessing makes them look more rubbery.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes. It must be.

Paul Boag:
So there you go, that’s my next selection is the Easy-Switch Bluetooth keyboard.

A pocket battery

Anker Astro Mini

So next up, a pocket battery. Do you carry a pocket battery around with you, Marcus?

Marcus Lillington:

No.

Paul Boag:
Do you always have power with you?

Marcus Lillington:

No, I don’t and I think I ought too because my phone nearly ran out on me yesterday because I used it a lot.

Paul Boag:
Exactly. Really, really useful thing to have. I mean there are loads of different, you kind of have to find the size that’s right for you, it depends how much you’re going to be reliant on it. So I have a couple – I have one that I take away when I go to you like conferences and things like that and I know I’m going to be using my iPad and my iPhone a lot and might not have power, so that’s a little bit bigger and then I have one that I kind of keep in my bag the whole time which is tiny.

Marcus Lillington:

Okay.

Paul Boag:
So the one I have in my bag the whole time is called an Anker Astro Mini, which is a tiny, tiny little thing. The other one I’m not sure what it’s called, I will find it and put a note in the show notes. What I really like about that one is, it’s got an American power socket built into the battery that kind of pushes out from it. Now you might think what use is that to man nor beast when you’re in the UK. Well, we actually in any hotel you stay in, there is actually an American power socket and it’s the one that is in the bathroom that’s for your shaver.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, so you can pour the shower water over your battery and your device.

Paul Boag:
Absolutely. Yes, you mix water with electricity and see what happens. So it’s really good because you don’t have to carry around extra cables or anything to plug it in and charge up your battery. You can just plug it in wherever you are. So they’re really, really useful to have and they’ve saved my life many and many times just – well not saved my life, that’s an exaggeration.

Marcus Lillington:

So how much juice would your little Mini one give your iPad Mini for example?

Paul Boag:
Yes, I don’t know. I haven’t tried kind of doing it from scratch. It will charge my iPhone a few times over.

Marcus Lillington:

Really?

Paul Boag:
Let’s have a look. Normally it says – the one, the Mini one I like because it’s just a little tube basically.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, I’m looking at it and it’s 14 quid.

Paul Boag:
Yes.

Marcus Lillington:

I’m having one.

Paul Boag:
Exactly.

Marcus Lillington:

This is why I’m enjoying this show so much.

Paul Boag:
All the stuff you’re going to buy. Right, it will add more than a full charge to your iPhone, that little thing. So it will give you another nine hours.

Marcus Lillington:

Which is – that’s what – that’s the thing you really want, isn’t it? You want to be able to charge your phone up, that’s the thing that dies.

Paul Boag:
Yes. So that’s – I mean the other one will do much better than that, but it’s much bigger. So this guy, this little one Anker thing, is a really nice one. There are loads others on the market and I’m sure somebody has found one that’s even cooler and better and you can let us know in the show notes and then Marcus can buy that one instead.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, exactly.

Paul Boag:
In the comments, not in the show notes, obviously. Okay, so that is my what sixth choice? Something like that we’re on.

Marcus Lillington:

I think so.

Paul Boag:
So next up number seven.

An SD card for extra laptop storage

StorEdge

Okay, number seven, is an SD card for extra storage on your MacBook or your laptop, because this is the downside of ultra thin, ultra light MacBook’s and …

Marcus Lillington:

No, it isn’t.

Paul Boag:
… various other things. Is they often are a bit light on hard drive space.

Marcus Lillington:

No they’re not.

Paul Boag:
But a lot of them, I don’t know whether yours does. Does the MacBook Air have an SD slot in it?

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, I’ve got an SD slot, but I’ve got 500 gigs of hard drive, so I would certainly never need one.

Paul Boag:
Sure. Okay, well a lot of people – you will hear a lot of people moaning about oh, I’m filling up my hard drive et cetera.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, that’s true. Dan is continually complaining about that because I think he’s only got 128 on his.

Paul Boag:
Yes, so he’s got one of the older models, hasn’t he?

Marcus Lillington:

But I do use it. It’s really useful, because I’ve got an SD card in my camera.

Paul Boag:
Absolutely.

Marcus Lillington:

Boom, straight out, straight in done.

Paul Boag:
Exactly. So it’s really useful from that point of view as well. But you can also use it as extra storage space on your Mac or your PC or whatever it is that you use. If you’ve got an SD slot, why not use it for extra storage space or if you’ve got a windows machine and don’t have a solid state drive, the SD card can actually increase the performance supposedly. I have never actually tried it because I’m not a Windows user of stuff because it’s being swapped back and forth to the flash drives. Yes, the flash drive on the SD card. So there is a lot to be said for getting a little SD card, popping it in the slot that’s available. Now, the reason that a lot of people don’t do it is because it sticks out from the side of the Mac and you feel like you’re going to get it caught and things like that. Well, there is something called StorEdge, which is an SD card, but it’s a shorter one designed specifically to fit into the SD slots on a Mac and I don’t know, I’ve not tried it on a PC, so I don’t know about a PC and it will sit flush to the computer, which means that obviously it’s got – not going to stick out, not going to get knocked and basically becomes an invisible part of your computer like an internal component, but allowing you extra storage space, which I think is really useful.

Marcus Lillington:

That is a good thing. I don’t need it myself, but yes definitely.

Paul Boag:
Oh, I’m sorry. Have I just suggested something you don’t need?

Marcus Lillington:

I’m quite disappointed that I haven’t opened another window on Amazon.

Paul Boag:
I’m so sorry. Alright well, let’s see if we can do better with number eight.

A docking station for your laptop

Henge Dock

So this one is my latest purchase.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, see I’ve never found one that I like. We ought to say what it is.

Paul Boag:
Yes. It’s basically a docking station for your laptop. It’s the thing I miss most from my Dell days.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, they were bloody good, weren’t they?

Paul Boag:
They were just brilliant. You pop it in. I’m fed up with forever plugging cables in and out and so a couple of weeks ago I made a decision no, I’m going to sort this problem, I’ve had enough of it. And it arrived yesterday and it led to me completely rearranging my entire office which was probably bit of an over the top reaction to a new gadget. So I have got – I have moved everything around, it’s all very nice now and I’ve got no visible cables whatsoever from where I sit on my desk. I don’t sit on the desk, I sit on the chair looking at the desk, but you know what I mean? So the one that I have is a Henge Dock. Now I have a MacBook Pro, so I have the Henge Dock vertical for the MacBook Pro, okay. Now I know Marcus, you use your laptop as a second screen, don’t you?

Marcus Lillington:

I do and I like to have that although going back to the new glasses issue. I’ve actually shut it today because it’s too far away.

Paul Boag:
See now everybody is different, but for me personally, I just use my Cinema display.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, but I don’t have a Cinema display, Paul.

Paul Boag:
Well, you need one of those as well then. Add that to the list. So the really big display for me is enough and I use spaces as well. So having a second screen is pointless from my point of view, I’m not saying for other people. So what the Henge Dock does is, you literally just kind of slot it in, into this dock closed laptop slots in, connects through all the connectors and away you go, job done. But there are other versions available and there is a horizontal dock that they have got coming soon which is for – I don’t know whether that one is for the Air or the Pro, that looks really quite good. There are loads of different docks around for, so you’ve got a MacBook Air, haven’t you?

Marcus Lillington:

I have a MacBook Air 13 inch. I’m looking at the high-speed docking station for by Henge Docks.

Paul Boag:
Yes, that’s very similar, the Air One is almost identical to the one that, that I have got. The only thing is, unfortunately with the Air, the power cable is on the top, on the different side. So you have a cable running up and connecting it to the top, so not quite as good as the Pro, where everything is nice and neat and on one side. But it’s still pretty good. I just find it so convenient, it helps my OCD, because I don’t have as much wired. I hate cables with a passion. And it keeps everything nice and tidy, it means that you can get stuff in and out.

Marcus Lillington:

And if I go for the Logitech device thing, the keyboard that I can have different devices, my iPad Mini can be my second screen.

Paul Boag:
Exactly. See it’s all worked out perfectly. You’re going to go on a massive spending spree after this.

Marcus Lillington:

Might do.

Paul Boag:
Don’t forget the Cinema display.

Marcus Lillington:

That’s the one thing that I feel that I can’t get. I don’t need one. I’ve got a big screen. It’s just a Samsung one.

Paul Boag:
Go on, buy it. Go on, do it.

Marcus Lillington:

You buy it for me.

Paul Boag:
Right. I’m going on the Apple site now.

Marcus Lillington:

Okay.

Paul Boag:
See I’m going to America next week. I could buy it for you and get it much, much cheaper. But unfortunately carrying it home …

Marcus Lillington:

Something like that.

Paul Boag:
… might be inconvenient.

Marcus Lillington:

Under your arm.

Paul Boag:
Oh of course the app store is currently down.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, of course.

Paul Boag:
Because we’re pre-announcement. It’s a bit early for it to be down isn’t it?

Marcus Lillington:

I don’t know what time the announcement is. I bet you do.

Paul Boag:
It’s only three o’clock now, so it’s three hours until the announcement.

Marcus Lillington:

Right.

Paul Boag:
So I can’t. I would have bought you a cinema display right there and then.

Marcus Lillington:

Set yourself a reminder for when you get back.

Paul Boag:
You actually want me to do it, don’t you? Right, let’s move on to our eighth choice, I’m ignoring Marcus now.

Noise cancelling headphones

QuietComfort 20i Acoustic Noise Cancelling headphones

So this one I’m not going to have any problems convincing you to get.

Marcus Lillington:

This is the thing that I’ve – I was going to buy these probably when they first came out. Which was what, 20 years ago?

Paul Boag:
Yes, no not this particular pair.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, but they’re the same principal, basically it’s headphones with acoustic noise cancelling and I can remember the first Bose ones came out and it was like you know what I’d really like those, but I don’t travel enough, I said to myself and I say it to myself every single time, I nearly bought some when we came back from Chicago last time. Nah I put them back on the shelf. I just can’t bring myself to buy them.

Paul Boag:
It’s so good, Marcus.

Marcus Lillington:

I know.

Paul Boag:
And it’s not even just – you say I don’t travel enough, it’s not just about traveling. They’re amazing on the airplane. You imagine that train trip you did yesterday, completely cut off from everything that was going on around you, totally being able to focus on what you’re doing. And that’s the big thing, that’s the reason why it’s made my list, it’s because as digital professionals we end up working all over the place. A lot of us go and work at coffee shops or working on trains or work in the airport lounges, a lot of us work from home and we don’t have a dedicated home space and there is noise going around at home, kids screaming etcetera. Even in the office when – you’ve got people recording podcasts really annoyingly just in the next room and or whatever it is about, having a pair of noise cancelling headphones is absolutely invaluable. There are different varieties. I have the Quiet Comfort 20i acoustic noise cancelling headphones from Bose.

Marcus Lillington:

They’re £260.

Paul Boag:
Yes, for in-ear headphones. Now, which seems obscene doesn’t it?

Marcus Lillington:

It does.

Paul Boag:
Yes.

Marcus Lillington:

I mean, don’t get me wrong, I’ve got Bose stuff at home, but at least I seem to be getting a little bit more than just a bit of wire with a plastic bit on the end.

Paul Boag:
Yes, that’s the problem, isn’t it with the Bose headphone, with the in-ear ones is they’re so tiny. Now I think, I am probably quite peculiar in wanting those. The reason that I picked those was because I do travel so much and carrying a big pair of headphones around it was just a pain in the ass for getting on the planes and that kind of stuff. And the noise cancelling is absolutely excellent on them and is to be honest almost as good as the over ear, but not as good. I think for the vast majority of other people that the over the ear ones would probably be better.

Marcus Lillington:

Same price?

Paul Boag:
Yes, but they’re about the same price again. But for some reason they feel cheaper, because they’re more substantial. So it’s a lot of money for headphones, but Marcus it’s still a lot cheaper than a watch.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, but if you look at what’s going on inside a watch.

Paul Boag:
Well, you look at the incredible complexity just because you can’t understand the complexity of noise cancelling, doesn’t make it any less incredible. It makes it more incredible, Marcus.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, because it’s proper magic.

Paul Boag:
It’s proper magic, not cogs.

Marcus Lillington:

Instead of just lots of cogs.

Paul Boag:
Yes.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, I mean you can spend a lot more than 260 quid on a pair of headphones that don’t do noise cancelling, so it’s not ultra stupid money. It’s just – yes – I’m still not going to do it. I’ve got – it’s in my head now. I must never buy these things.

Paul Boag:
I might have to go and buy you them as well after I’ve bought you the cinema display.

Marcus Lillington:

Okay. Thanks, Paul. I look forward to that.

Paul Boag:
Alright. Let’s move on to our last one.

A comfortable office chair

IKEA Markus

Okay, the last one is a boring and practical one, which is to get yourself a damn comfortable office chair.

Marcus Lillington:

Interesting.

Paul Boag:
Because we spend so much of our lives sitting, don’t we?

Marcus Lillington:

Yes.

Paul Boag:
And I just think it’s really important that we have a chair that’s adjustable, comfortable, has good lumbar support, all those kinds of good nice things that you should have with these kinds of stuff. Now I couldn’t remember for the life of me what our chairs are, that we have at Headscape.

Marcus Lillington:

I don’t know.

Paul Boag:
No, I don’t know either. So I gave up on that and I did a little search around to see what is around. Now I will put link in the show notes to the top 10 ergonomic office chairs, which is a really good article that’s got a whole range of them from ridiculously expensive ones to one from IKEA, which I wanted to mention. It’s not the prettiest chair, but it’s called Markus, so it just seems very appropriate.

Marcus Lillington:

Well first of all, I’m looking up what our office chairs are called, because I’m pretty sure I can find them. If they still sell them. Anyway yes, carry on as you were.

Paul Boag:
So yes, the IKEA Markus is only £125, so it’s very much like Marcus, really it’s named after him.

Marcus Lillington:

And it’s cheap.

Paul Boag:
It’s not particularly pretty and it’s cheap, yes. So – but get yourself a decent office chair. Again, it feels like a lot, some of these really good chairs go up to £1,500 or more. And it feels like a hell of a lot of money to pay for something that essentially you’re just sitting on, until you remember that you’re sitting on it for over 8 hours a day and that getting a bad chair can cripple you for life.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes, I quite like that IKEA one. But much like my scanner, I’ve had the chair that I bought in PC World which is a big kind of director’s leather thing since we started the company. And if I actually look at it, it’s sort of covered in holes and stuff. But I shouldn’t have a chair like this. I perch on the edges of them, I have done forever. I perch, I don’t sit with my back into the – against the back of it unless I am slobbing around. I perch – I sit with them too high and I sit like you would on a stool, always have done.

Paul Boag:
You’re a bad man.

Marcus Lillington:

Bad, bad.

Paul Boag:
So there is no point in you spending money on a good office chair, because you wouldn’t use it?

Marcus Lillington:

No, other that – no, I should get myself an IKEA Markus, because then I can have a chair that’s named after me.

Paul Boag:
Yes, for no other reason.

Marcus Lillington:

Yes.

Paul Boag:
If we were to calculate how much you’re now going to spend following this podcast. It’s going to be the world’s most expensive podcast.

Marcus Lillington:

Well, especially if you buy me all those presents, Paul.

Paul Boag:
You do know I’m buying them on the company, not out of my own money.

Marcus Lillington:

I don’t care, la, la, la.

Paul Boag:
Okay. Well, that wraps up this weeks show, except for Marcus’s joke.

Marcus Lillington:

Well, this is your joke, Paul.

Paul Boag:
Oh it’s my joke?

Marcus Lillington:

Yes.

Paul Boag:
Are you going to use the one I posted on Facebook?

Marcus Lillington:

Yes. I liked it. It made me titter. So I met this girl. She swear she recognizes me from the vegetarian restaurant, but I’ve never met her before. I’ve got it wrong, herbivore. I did the joke wrong.

Paul Boag:
No, it was a good try.

Marcus Lillington:

That I’ve never met herbivore.

Paul Boag:
Herbivore.

Marcus Lillington:

Herbivore, there you go.

Paul Boag:
No it was – you just made it sound like the one joke that I’ve ever contributed is the shittest one of all time, because you haven’t told it right.

Marcus Lillington:

Well, I haven’t messed one up really badly for a while, so I was due.

Paul Boag:
Bruce did a whole string of really bad jokes on Twitter. Bruce Lawson, link in the show notes.

Marcus Lillington:

Many of his are – many of the ones I use are ones he’s used. Maybe I will go back and find another one.

Paul Boag:
Yes you’ve got to do better than that.

Marcus Lillington:

Carry on. I’m going to find one of Bruce Lawson’s old jokes.

Paul Boag:
Oh, okay. You got it already? Wow that’s quick.

Marcus Lillington:

No, no, no. I haven’t found it yet. I’ll get there.

Paul Boag:
Alright. I was just going to say that I think on next week’s show we ought to do the top 10 bits of software that every web professional should own.

Marcus Lillington:

Yeah alright.

Paul Boag:
That might be a good carry on.

Marcus Lillington:

It won’t be anywhere near as interesting as actual gadgety things, but …

Paul Boag:
No, that’s true. But I don’t know, I will have to think about it. Might come up with something else instead.

Marcus Lillington:

I had so many jokes over the years.

Paul Boag:
It’s too late now, we’re just sitting around waiting for you to tell another bad joke.

Marcus Lillington:

I’ve got a good one. Ian Lasky joke, I have no doubt used this in some series. Why did the chicken cross the playground?

Paul Boag:
Go on.

Marcus Lillington:

To get to the other slide. That’s a much better joke.

Paul Boag:
I quite like that one actually.

Marcus Lillington:

Much better joke.

Paul Boag:
Yes. Alright then, well that wraps up this week’s show. I’m sorry everybody, if I’ve cost you a lot of money. Hopefully, you’ve got more self-control than Marcus and don’t feel the need to buy everything on the list. But join us again next week when we will be talking about software hopefully. Unless I think of something else to talk about. Talk to you then. Bye.

Marcus Lillington:

Bye.

Boagworks

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